Obsessed by living longer?

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#1
Watching the STV News just now and a report states that those living in high rise towerblocks live longer than those who live at ground floor level. They have x% less chance of heart disease, y% less chance of lung disease and so on.

We are preached at daily that eating this will shorten your life, drinking that will extend your life and smoking the other will mean you're already dead.

Why are we obsessed with living longer and longer. On a planet that is barely able to feed the people already on board, why do we want to fill it even more with old folk. Isn't it better to live a shorter life and enjoy it rather than a long, dull, monotonous life?
 
L

lumpy2

Guest
#2
A general decline in spiritual or religious faith may have contributed to a widespread fear of death.

One could argue that this means we are thinking more rationally and intellectually, but if it leads to people being obsessed with longevity and the pointless pursuit of anti-ageing remedies (a crime against nature imho) then surely we have thown the baby out with the bathwater - we don't seem to have replaced religious faith with any sort of sensible attitude to the natural cycle of life and death.
 
E

EScotia

Guest
#3
I'm not obsessed with living longer & longer at all. In fact I've had enough of this so-called life and can't wait for it to end (and there's undoubtedly many people agreeing with me :) ) so I'm eating all kinds of stuff, drinking everything I can get my mitts on and living at ground level after years of living at 20,000 feet as a tiffy!

Still don't smoke though.
 
#4
A general decline in spiritual or religious faith may have contributed to a widespread fear of death
Fear of death is an instinct, it is hard coded into our brains, for most people, faith (or honour) won't be enough to eradicate it.

Or are you suggesting religious people aren't afraid of death? All except for the hardcore doesn't seem to be very keen on entering paradise.
 
#5
i for one try to embrace the fact that death is always on your heels but being an atheist and believing i die and thats it sucks however i find it more comforting than going to a place full of religious wack jobs
 
L

lumpy2

Guest
#6
Fear of death is an instinct, it is hard coded into our brains, for most people, faith (or honour) won't be enough to eradicate it.

Or are you suggesting religious people aren't afraid of death? All except for the hardcore doesn't seem to be very keen on entering paradise.
I regret bringing religion into the discussion now! I'm sure you have a point - but it does seem that people used to be more accepting of the fact that we have a limited span on earth, after which we need to shove off and make room for others - I'm fairly certain that this greedy obsession with the value of our own lives has only become prevalent in the last few decades.

I went through a brief phase of being afraid of ageing and death some thirty years ago, but I soon got over it.
 
#7
When health and diet 'experts' declare evidence of life extending concepts they never tell you that the time you gain will be the later years in a care home having your arrse wiped.

Similar to the pension plan salesmen who say you should live on a shoe string now to fund a 'wealthy' old age.
 
#9
When health and diet 'experts' declare evidence of life extending concepts they never tell you that the time you gain will be the later years in a care home having your arrse wiped.

Similar to the pension plan salesmen who say you should live on a shoe string now to fund a 'wealthy' old age.
Mate, remember Birdman's antics down Union Street? I'm following that fella's plan. Drink, dance and sexual harassment - it worked for him, it can work for me.
 
#10
Watching the STV News just now and a report states that those living in high rise towerblocks live longer than those who live at ground floor level. They have x% less chance of heart disease, y% less chance of lung disease and so on.

We are preached at daily that eating this will shorten your life, drinking that will extend your life and smoking the other will mean you're already dead.

Why are we obsessed with living longer and longer. On a planet that is barely able to feed the people already on board, why do we want to fill it even more with old folk. Isn't it better to live a shorter life and enjoy it rather than a long, dull, monotonous life?
Legs, after a lot of your posts on a Health linked topic, I'm not sure that you're looking at this matter completely objectively. I want to live as long as I can, I anticipate being as happy and healthy as I have to date, but if something bad comes along, que sera.

It's about a positive outlook as far as I'm concerned, not a negative one.

Regards

BL
 
#11
I'm not obsessed with living longer & longer at all. In fact I've had enough of this so-called life and can't wait for it to end (and there's undoubtedly many people agreeing with me :) ) so I'm eating all kinds of stuff, drinking everything I can get my mitts on and living at ground level after years of living at 20,000 feet as a tiffy!

Still don't smoke though.
Your final journey courtesy of the crematorium might solve that one.

A journey a long way off of course.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
Unless and until you learn to accept the fact that you will age and die, it is impossible to be truly happy. IMHO anyway.
 
#13
I'd rather eat my gun than extend a miserable existence in a nursing home. Filling my nappy and dribbling Ensure down my chin is no sort of a life. It has to be quality over quantity. I turned 40 last year and while it seems like such a cliche it really was a significant change over point. My 30s were shitty,turbulent years that had me ,at times,not caring if I lived or died. Eventually though I copped on a bit and stopped making excuses and just got on with it. I drew a line under it and accepted what could not be changed and jumped into what could be. I even went back to Uni FFS!

Now I might get a slap off a bus in the morning or live well into my dotage ( 'DAT' rifle...wibble...Walkman....Ford Cortina..wibble) but I'm going to make the most of it. I saw what a lifetime of hard work did to my grandparents.They looked to be in their 70s while they were in their 50s.There is an expectation now that our later years will be better,active,healthier and that there will be more of them. Advances in medicine,science,diet have fed into this expectation and the' greying' populations in the developed world are having huge impacts on health care systems, labour markets,retirement cut offs and pension contributions.

Erk....sorry about the novella there.
 
L

lumpy2

Guest
#17
**** off **** I'm now as skinny as my former self in the days when I was a racing snake. Tipping the scales at under 12 and a half stone down from the 16 and a bit in October last year.
Sorry I can't find that "over your head" emoticon!

I think BL was referring to your spelling :)
 
#18
Fact. We all die. Sometimes before the taxman catches up.

I consider this report to be part of the greater fear factor industry which has leapt to the fore since the end of the Cold War. Got to keep the lemmings worried about something.
 
#19
A general decline in spiritual or religious faith may have contributed to a widespread fear of death.

One could argue that this means we are thinking more rationally and intellectually, but if it leads to people being obsessed with longevity and the pointless pursuit of anti-ageing remedies (a crime against nature imho) then surely we have thown the baby out with the bathwater - we don't seem to have replaced religious faith with any sort of sensible attitude to the natural cycle of life and death.
Mmm, and yet the Christian Church makes so much of "everlasting life"... conundrum.
 

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