Obituaries - Lieutenant-Colonel David Danger

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by heard_it_all_before, Apr 11, 2009.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Probably the wrong place to post this, but after I read it in yesterday's Telegraph I just had to post it.

    Lieutenant-Colonel David Danger

    Lieutenant-Colonel David Danger, who has died aged 85, served with the SAS as a radio operator; he was parachuted into enemy-occupied France in 1944 and was later awarded a Military Medal.

    In June 1944, Danger, then a corporal, was dropped near Dijon as a member of the main reconnaissance party for Operation Houndsworth. The mission's objective was to disrupt enemy lines of communication and prevent German units from moving up to Normandy to reinforce their offensive against the Allied bridgehead.

    Danger's team established base camps and ammunition dumps in the forest and was constantly being hunted by the enemy. Medical facilities were very basic, and in the early weeks those who were badly wounded and could not be evacuated were operated upon on a kitchen table by a French surgeon. Full Obituary here

    R.I.P. Colonel
     
  2. Does anyone else here think that is a GREAT name and SAS no less.

    RIP

    Edd
     
  3. People have a tendency to say when these Great old Men pass, that they don't make 'um like that anymore. But we know they still do and see it time and again with our forces.

    Rest In Peace old man,back to barracks with you.
     
  4. I think that what makes these 'Old Boy's' heroic tales so valiant, is that in those times, once you were dropped in you were well and truly on your own.

    I once had the utmost honour and privilege to meet and have a pint with this man in the village pub, Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Firbank. I dare say that in decades to come the young soldiers of the future will meet the 'Old Boys'of today, that fought and served in the Operational Theatres that those past and present have served in over the past 40 or so years and will hold them in the same awe and respect that we hold those of the two world wars.

    The Obituaries will carry the life stories and heroic tales of those so brave, that in the future, many will hardly be able to comprehend the severity of the situations that the soldiers were in at those times.
     
  5. I read the obituary linked to above. On the left side of the page are links to the obituaries of four other recently deceased officers all of which are well worth reading. Amazing men!
     
  6. RIP Colonel
     
  7. Dave Danger, you could not make that one up ?

    Amazing. These blokes were just so unbelievable.

    Dragoon.