O-Type engagement? Whats that then??

Discussion in 'Army Pay, Claims & JPA' started by Thermo_Man, Dec 19, 2006.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. To clarify: I recieved my joining instructions today for the infantry, and as looked through the types of engagement on my contract I saw at the the end "O-type" which talks of recruits who wish to try to become officers. I failed RCB in Nov '05, although I was asked to come back, and I am now joining up with the intention to try again for a commission at a later date.

    This type of engagement was never mentioned to me by any of my recruiters and the only time I have ever heard of it was in Michael Ashers autobiography "Shoot to Kill", about his time in the Paras, RUC, and 23 SAS, where apparantly he was on one in the early 70's. As I don't really want to use this as my only frame of reference can anybody shed some light on the details of this and ramifications of being on an O-type engagement.

    Cheers

    Thermo

    (apologises for bad spelling)
     
  2. IIRC the 'O' Type was exactly as you say, for those who were joining with an aspiration to be officers. The Army used to have a four (?) potential occifer courses (RCT, Guards Bde Squad, can't remember the other two). The script with these was that an individual could join as a soldier, with the specific intention of doing a development course leading to commissioning, but with the get out clause of being allowed to leave if unsuccessful at RCB, as was. The alternative was to sign up for three years and be committed to serving as a soldier in the ranks if unsuccessful at RCB. For the young gentleman who wanted a commission in the Guards but required a 'little development' before RCB, serving as a soldier in the ranks after failing RCB was not part of the game plan.

    The answer to your question ref 'O' Type is in Queen Regulations. I am sure that it still exists although I may be wrong. I would think that you are entering the Army on a normal soldiers Notice Engagement committing you to four years man service. If you do subsequently pass AOSB then you will serve as a soldier on paper until the day you are commissioned.

    Does that answer your question or do you require more info?