Nutrition & diet; the consequences

So basically everyone has reduced their calorific intake in some way or other, some have moved more, and lost weight - brill.

It's good that people have found the right version of it that works for them to make the lifestyle change needed.
Yep thats about the size of it

I follow a James Smith ; a PT who is the "calorie deficit guy" in the fitness world
Hilarious bloke who says c**t.... a lot so would fit in well here
 
Yep thats about the size of it

I follow a James Smith ; a PT who is the "calorie deficit guy" in the fitness world
Hilarious bloke who says c**t.... a lot so would fit in well here
Last summer, I smashed the 5:2 with keto. I was cycling 100km and eating fat (coconut and cashew butter). It has very effective, just not sustainable, primarily due to the draw of beer and bread. I'm back on 5:2 but not proper keto which I struggle to maintain. It's probably the easiest way to deficit if you can stick to it, and I don't struggle with energy either.
 
Last summer, I smashed the 5:2 with keto. I was cycling 100km and eating fat (coconut and cashew butter). It has very effective, just not sustainable, primarily due to the draw of beer and bread. I'm back on 5:2 but not proper keto which I struggle to maintain. It's probably the easiest way to deficit if you can stick to it, and I don't struggle with energy either.
I think the message from a lot of the no nosense PT 's is find what works for you

Be it a form of exercise that you enjoy ; cos be fair not all of us are able or want to run and run like your life or eardrums depend on it
A diet, calorie restriction; call it what you will
 
Yeah, that was my point pretty much - the basics are the same, everyone then put's their unique spin on it and works out what fits them best. That's what people who really want to make the changes do.

Those that don't try a set program, it doesn't work for them, give up, eat cake, loads of cake, tons of it.
 
cake.jpg
 
Yeah, that was my point pretty much - the basics are the same, everyone then put's their unique spin on it and works out what fits them best. That's what people who really want to make the changes do.

Those that don't try a set program, it doesn't work for them, give up, eat cake, loads of cake, tons of it.
There's still the question of what is a good/bad calorie?
 
There's still the question of what is a good/bad calorie?
I suppose nutritionally there's an argument but from a pure weight loss/gain perspective, find the thing that works for you to stick to your goals, you'll be far more successful.

Sounds so easy...
 
There's still the question of what is a good/bad calorie?
It's a question that makes about as much sense as what is a good/bad gallon or mile or hour. A calorie is simply a measure of the energy released when food is burnt. 1 calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius.

The only complication is that food values are given in Calories (capital C) which are kilocalories ie. the energy required to raise the temperature of a litre of water by 1 degree Celsius.

Pedantry over.
 
It's a question that makes about as much sense as what is a good/bad gallon or mile or hour. A calorie is simply a measure of the energy released when food is burnt. 1 calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius.

The only complication is that food values are given in Calories (capital C) which are kilocalories ie. the energy required to raise the temperature of a litre of water by 1 degree Celsius.

Pedantry over.
I was more thinking of the insulin effect a sugar has compared to fat.
 

Awol

LE
When I had the last operation on my innards in October 2019, the surgeon apparently accidentally cut my vagus nerve, which for some reason meant that I would never be able to eat solids again. For a while after I came out of hospital I was drinking Fortisyps which are tiny yoghurt type drinks given on prescription.

They supposedly contain all the vitamins and minerals one needs to stay alive, and obviously contain no unnecessary fat, so would be ideal for someone trying to lose weight.

After a while I got fed up with going down to the chemist and coming away with about thirty little pots which would last me only about four days, it just became a pain in the Arrse, so I went over to the bulk protein power that body builders use. Hugely expensive, £50 for a large pot, although Holland and Barrett usually have them on sale at half price.

After a while on the powder I simply became sick of just drinking what was essentially slime a couple of times a day, even though it was again, keeping me alive, so I tentatively went back on to solids, eating child size meals. There was also the fact that I was trying to add weight to my body (I entered hospital at 8 stone, down from 12 stone a month before).

And that’s where I am now, but the vagus nerve thing is having an effect because as regular as clockwork, every thirty days or so, I have a couple of days vomiting, but I still think it’s worth it and my weight is now back up to normal.

So, the lesson I’ve learnt is that if one is trying to lose weight, give the body building protein powder a go. It definitely contains everything you need to stay healthy and zero fat and also makes you feel full. £25 will last about two weeks. The only downside is that drinking what is basically slime gets a bit unpleasant after a while, but the flavours,chocolate, strawberry and caramel, means you can vary them every couple of weeks.
 
@Awol , check out Huel mate. Mixed with MyProtein whey powder it's very palatable and cheaper bought in bulk than your stuff. Huel is also fortified with everything your body needs.

I mix strawberry cream whey with mixed Berry huel in full skim milk and crushed ice. Basically a milkshake.

Nestle Meritene also do fortified soups and protein powders that are cheap. My dad struggles with solids too and likes their soups.
 
Last edited:

Niamac

GCM
A good PT can use calipers to determine how much fat you have, take off about 3 or 4 kg for bone mass, the rest is muscle.
What - no stomach, intestines, liver, brain etc?
 
Ahem...really...


Yes really.

To suggest that your body magically creates more energy out of what is ingested because of a 'slowed metabolism' is ridiculous. 'Processed' food may be more 'fattening' because it is low in satiety and easier to over eat due to being calorie 'dense' for its volume, though if eaten in moderation ie while still in a calorie deficit you will lose weight.

Low carbohydrate and low fat diets may lead to long term weight gain as they may be proponents of vilifying certain foods; pizza, ice cream, cookies, chocolate etc. The more 'austere' a diet is the more typical an individual will give up due to an an all or nothing approach to nutrition, leading to weight regain even beyond their initial weight.
 
What - no stomach, intestines, liver, brain etc?
In terms of mass, that is almost entirely water.
It is also metabolically active (burns calories) and a Bio-electrical device will measure it as muscle, which is fine for working out your BMR.... because it is metabolically active.
 
Yes really.

To suggest that your body magically creates more energy out of what is ingested because of a 'slowed metabolism' is ridiculous. 'Processed' food may be more 'fattening' because it is low in satiety and easier to over eat due to being calorie 'dense' for its volume, though if eaten in moderation ie while still in a calorie deficit you will lose weight.

Low carbohydrate and low fat diets may lead to long term weight gain as they may be proponents of vilifying certain foods; pizza, ice cream, cookies, chocolate etc. The more 'austere' a diet is the more typical an individual will give up due to an an all or nothing approach to nutrition, leading to weight regain even beyond their initial weight.
You have a point but there's plenty of evidence to show that sugar and carbohydrates have a negative effect on the body. Also, its a very easy excuse to say that a diet was too austere so I came off it. If you want to lose weight you will lose it, you might just have to have a word with yourself on a more regular basis.
 
You have a point but there's plenty of evidence to show that sugar and carbohydrates have a negative effect on the body.

Agreed, if eaten to *excess*, same for saturated fats. If we consider variables other than weight gain/ loss concerning the source of your calories being 'good' or 'bad' such as your lipid panel.

You could eat a stick of butter wrapped in bacon and still lose weight, though this will probably have an adverse impact on your LDL if the bulk of your calories is from the bacon butter diet.

And it is an easy excuse, but people unfortunately conflate easy with simple. Cutting calories is simple, for the majority of overweight/ obese it is a difficult long term process.
 
You have a point but there's plenty of evidence to show that sugar and carbohydrates have a negative effect on the body. Also, its a very easy excuse to say that a diet was too austere so I came off it. If you want to lose weight you will lose it, you might just have to have a word with yourself on a more regular basis.
I did and I have...as light now as I was the day I joined up in 1975...
 

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