Nurse William Pooley plans a return to Hotel Ebola

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
while not wishing to declaim his hard work and dedication ( hes got guts) , frankly the odds are rather stacked against him, William Pooley plans to return to Hotel Ebola in the next few weeks,the comment it is likely he is immune to the illness worries me, if he contracts it once again will the RAF lay on another aircraft ? in our cash hardened times it was a great PR blast for the RAF and the medical services , but I really think the Guinea itself ought to wake up and take decisive action, the political movers and shakers dont seem to lack funds or indeed medical care
whats your opinion
me I think he is very brave and dedicated, but the odds are stacked against him, both on the risk of a repeat dose and the culture of the country ?

Guinea is one of the major exporters of Bauxite ( used to make aluminium) to russia, china USA
thats means big bucks so who is creaming it all in, while the people starve ?
 

mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
Pooley is indeed brave. He wont be immune and may well get it again if he isnt careful. If he did have immunity he would be a very valuable commodity indeed and would have more blood taken from him by scientists than he ever dripped out with the fever.

The RAF may well have wanted to try out quarantine procedures for real. Our hospitals are getting ready for repatriation of affected British aid workers (They are insured you know)

Its only for UK aid workers. No one expects some thousands of African students from the affected areas to come to UK for the start of the university courses. Dear me no. That would be terrible.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I had not realised that they are insured, of course as a humanitarian mission the costs are irrelevant, human life is above that
I wonder fi they learnt a great deal from him ?
do they still have a London School of tropical medicines ?
I recall a relative who was a London cabbie, back in the 60s picking up from heathrow a chap wo had to be taken directly there, thent he cab was sterilized and valeted
of course African students coming here is a worry, plenty of other people from the old colonies seem to make a habit of using our health service shortly after arriving at heathrow ??
ooh I just googled the LSTM
seems they have a massive problem with Africans with Aids ???
http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/
 

mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
I had not realised that they are insured, of course as a humanitarian mission the costs are irrelevant, human life is above that
I wonder fi they learnt a great deal from him ?
do they still have a London School of tropical medicines ?
I recall a relative who was a London cabbie, back in the 60s picking up from heathrow a chap wo had to be taken directly there, thent he cab was sterilized and valeted
of course African students coming here is a worry, plenty of other people from the old colonies seem to make a habit of using our health service shortly after arriving at heathrow ??
ooh I just googled the LSTM
seems they have a massive problem with Africans with Aids ???
http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/

Then insurance will cover the RAF thing. London still does have a school of tropical medicine. Its a bit busy now.

Actually RGN Pooley may be one of the most important nurses since Florrie Nightingale. He has gone into that storm and survived it. He needs a medal the size of a dustbin lid.

That he did survive in the first instance means that that some survive with good treatment. I cannot imagine that good treatment in Sierra leone is to the standard Pooley got, but it is encouraging.
 
Hat's off to this guy. He could have said enough was enough but he hasn't. If by some unfortunate chance, he got it again, I don't have a problem with him being brought back again.

Those who are ill and dying over there need skilled nursing care. It's not for anybody to dictate or deny them the care that can save a life even if there is a price that we must pay. It's a grain of sand from a very large pile of sand in a cost sense.

Ebola is a disease that could infect and kill millions. There are some things that the world must pull together on regardless of our differences.
 
A bloke gets shot, recuperates and goes back to join his mates on ops.

What's the difference?
 
Every bloke on ops volunteered out of role to get in harm's way?

He's a brave bloke and his skills - not to mention experience - are in demand. Better we fight ebola there than have to fight it here, no?
 
If he has had this virus, will he not now be protected from it?
 
I'm all for rescuing stranded Brits at taxpayers expense if they are in a country or situation that has dissolved around them, it's simply the right thing to do.

But people who put themselves at risk contrary to the advice of the foreign office should be told they do so at their own risk and there will be no national intervention if things go pear shaped.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
If he has had this virus, will he not now be protected from it?


well the doctors think he is resistant to it, but its an unproved science, trial and error, the thing that bothers me is that the home country is doing next to nothing to educate people, and treat people, and the locals have a marked resilience to taking treatment from Europeans as they think we infect them ?
its lack of education and eating bushmeat
I agree we dont want the disease here, but how much money must we throw into another country while the leaders live of the fat of the land ( and our grants and loans) if the government ministers contracted it I am sure prompt treatment and first class medicine would be forthcoming ( via Learjet to Switzerland)
 

NSP

LE
Presumably he will have some resistance to the particular strain of ebola he had but not necessarily to others? A quick shuftie around t'interweb suggests that there are several strains of ebola in circulation. The WHO site lists five "distinct species." I'm not sure if that is a posh way of referring to strains or whether it's a different thing altogether.
 

Chodmeister

RIP
RIP
I have heard from a friend who has a nephew in Afghanistan that this repatriation meant that some military had to stay in theatre for an extra week whilst the aircraft was re-deployed.

Can anyone confirm this?
 
Brave guy I tip my hat to him ,but he must be daft going back. One dose of that would be enough for me I would rather walk around in down town Basra wearing g I shot me please shoot me sign than go with in a thousand miles of Ebola.
 
I have heard from a friend who has a nephew in Afghanistan that this repatriation meant that some military had to stay in theatre for an extra week whilst the aircraft was re-deployed.

Can anyone confirm this?

Unlikely. There is always a CCast team on standby. So other flight operations wouldn't change.
 
I have heard from a friend who has a nephew in Afghanistan that this repatriation meant that some military had to stay in theatre for an extra week whilst the aircraft was re-deployed.

Can anyone confirm this?

If that's the case, it's more of an indictment of the government cutting resources to the bone rather than someone needing assistance because of something happening to them in my view.

Rather than operating on a just in time business mode, there should be some capacity for unexpected situations. The armed forces are not Asda. It's a vital multi disciplinary strategic organisation providing complex services for the safer of the nation and it's citizens.

Edit. Dingers answered the question. I must keep up. :)
 
If he has had this virus, will he not now be protected from it?

There's more than one strain of Ebola Virus. The Congo (I think) has had a recent outbreak of a different strain than the one currently doing the rounds in the rest of Africa. I suppose that if there are different strains it's like the flu and you can catch it more than once.
 
Top