Nurse of the year leaves for private sector

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Blogg, Oct 17, 2007.

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  1. Along with a great many others no doubt. Still, never mind, even if the good nurses are being driven out, junior doctors are terminally p1ssed off, standards continue to drop and patients snuff it in droves there is loads more money to be thrown at the problem!

    So lots and lots of happy statistics can be found, upbeat stories created for the press, a few more hospitals still to be opened (again) and pictures to be fabricated. A positive outcome!


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/10/17/nnurse217.xml

    The "Nurse of the Year" 2007 has quit the NHS after becoming "ground down" by the bureaucrats and excessive paperwork that plague her profession.

    Justine Whitaker was awarded the Nursing Standard title this year but is leaving East Lancashire Primary Care Trust next month for the private sector and to become a lecturer.

    The 36-year-old has told how nursing staff were made to use cheaper bandages and dressings while health bosses wasted money on long meetings that achieved nothing.

    She yesterday warned that a culture of "mistrust and fear" had crept into the NHS and things were bound to go "completely wrong" in Britain's hospitals if nothing is done.

    She said: "Sitting in meetings we are constantly being told 'We're going for this cheaper option with this bandage; we're going for that cheaper option with that dressing; we need to be mindful of resources'.

    "I'm absolutely fine with that - I run my household like that - but what I see as a waste of resources is when I'm sitting in a big meeting and as a clinician I am the cheapest person there at £35,000 a year and decisions are still being put off to another meeting."


    The lymphoedema nurse, who has 14 years of clinical experience, added: "There is no sign the red-tape is being reduced. It all leads to more bureaucracy, which all leads to more form-filling and paperwork.

    GRRRRRR :x
     
  2. as a fellow nurse, I dont furkin blame her for 'jumping ship'

    almost a third of the NHS budget goes on administrators
     
  3. Saw this on the idiot box. What's the odds of anyone making waves over this one? The whips would be on dissenters like flies round sh1t. If any of the spineless wonders had the b@lls to dissent that is. :roll:
     
  4. No matter what the government claim about the NHS it is probably going downhill fast. I believe it when the politicians claim that more money is being spent on the NHS. I just think that it is getting wasted.

    Bringing in hospital "managers" from outside the medical profession was probably a very bad idea. Contracting out jobs such as cleaning another bad idea. Importing nurses from outside the UK in droves also bad. Undue concentration on government targets another pitfall. The cost of interpreters probably soaks up a lot of money.

    With a whole shedload of managers in hospitals I can imagine that paperwork has increased massively and some clinical responsibility/authority removed from medical workers.
     
  5. Sadly, it will always be the same when you have people in charge, who are not from that industry. All they see is the accounts and have no real experience. :evil: