NOT made in PR China ....

Yep. Not on the same scale but Sheffield still does some steel casting and toolmaking. Still top quality.
Surprising that we can still do it economically these days. Considering the energy prices, and global warming taxes that the West abides by. It's little wonder the Chinese can undercut us with virtually all their energy being coal powered. Last I heard, they were bringing one coal powered power station online every day. We're closing them and hiking up power costs 'cos green, innit.
 

lert

LE
Surprising that we can still do it economically these days. Considering the energy prices, and global warming taxes that the West abides by. It's little wonder the Chinese can undercut us with virtually all their energy being coal powered. Last I heard, they were bringing one coal powered power station online every day. We're closing them and hiking up power costs 'cos green, innit.
Unless you're suggesting that fossil fuelled energy production is somehow the future, I'd say that puts us in a good place. We are a generation or so ahead of China in the sphere of energy generation as well as enjoying a longer lifespan and generally fewer air quality related health issues. London is the worst place in this country and I'd still far rather go for a run there than Beijing!

We are, for good or ill, a post-industrial nation. While I'm not suggesting that a review of just what constitutes critical national infrastructure and capabilities, I will make the point that at the population level the standard of living in this country is far higher than when we were all down't pit or in't mill.
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
Surprising that we can still do it economically these days. Considering the energy prices, and global warming taxes that the West abides by. It's little wonder the Chinese can undercut us with virtually all their energy being coal powered. Last I heard, they were bringing one coal powered power station online every day. We're closing them and hiking up power costs 'cos green, innit.
Tell me about it. Up until recently I was a wind turbine tech for a major utility and when you get to grips with a) where all the large castings are made and have to be shipped from and b) how much coal is needed to make the steel for the turbine tower and components it kind of makes the whole effort look a bit silly.
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
Unless you're suggesting that fossil fuelled energy production is somehow the future, I'd say that puts us in a good place. We are a generation or so ahead of China in the sphere of energy generation as well as enjoying a longer lifespan and generally fewer air quality related health issues. London is the worst place in this country and I'd still far rather go for a run there than Beijing!

We are, for good or ill, a post-industrial nation. While I'm not suggesting that a review of just what constitutes critical national infrastructure and capabilities, I will make the point that at the population level the standard of living in this country is far higher than when we were all down't pit or in't mill.
We are 100% not ahead of China in energy production. They are massively into wind and hydro too. They are bang up to date. I agree with everything else you have said though.
 

lert

LE
We are 100% not ahead of China in energy production. They are massively into wind and hydro too. They are bang up to date. I agree with everything else you have said though.
No I mean in terms of strategy. They use fossil as a short term fix to rapidly increase capacity. Sooner or later that'll have to be replaced. Buy cheap, buy twice ironically!
 
Which two countries are involved with the building of our next generation of nuclear power stations? One of them is France bet you can't guess the other partner who's getting heavily into nuclear?
 
No I mean in terms of strategy. They use fossil as a short term fix to rapidly increase capacity. Sooner or later that'll have to be replaced. Buy cheap, buy twice ironically!
They use fossil fuels to enable their economic growth and standard of living to increase now while they build up capacity in other areas and shift their economic base to other sectors. They don't plan on being heavy industry-dominant forever.
 

lert

LE
They use fossil fuels to enable their economic growth and standard of living to increase now while they build up capacity in other areas and shift their economic base to other sectors. They don't plan on being heavy industry-dominant forever.
Yes. That's what I just said. And in that one particular sphere we are currently a generation or so ahead. Maintaining that, or even whether we need to, is another question entirely.
 
They use fossil fuels to enable their economic growth and standard of living to increase now while they build up capacity in other areas and shift their economic base to other sectors. They don't plan on being heavy industry-dominant forever.
From what I've read, China's recent binge of building coal fired power plants had to do with changes in the regulatory regime, the intention of which was to reduce red tape by devolving powers from the central level to the provinces or local authorities.

The local authorities were able to borrow money from the central government for capital projects on very favourable terms and spunked it away on new power plants in an attempt to be the first to build new capacity and use it to attract industry.

The result has been massive over capacity in the coal fired power plant sector, and the corresponding low capacity utilisation. They now sit as white elephants all over the country. This is why the central government had to step back in and temporarily ban new coal fired power plant in a large number of provinces (I don't know if that moratorium has expired yet).

From what I have read about it, planning of power plants in China has actually been a bit of a shambles, mitigated by rapid economic growth eventually soaking up the excess capacity. As China shifts from an economy focused on industry to one with a heavier emphasis on services and technology, they are not going to be able to continue relying on rapid electric power demand growth to bail out poor planning. They are going to have to get a regulatory regime together which produces a better balance of centralised capacity planning with flexible bottom-up planning of implementation.

A number of Western countries went through a similar set of electric power problems in the 1970s and 80s, with what was actually going on being somewhat masked by the contemporaneous oil crisis, recession, and new air quality standards. This in many cases led to big shake ups in the electricity sector in those countries (including the province where I live).

Most of what you read in the general interest Western press about the coal fired electricity sector in China seems to be propaganda being put out by lobbyists who are trying to get air pollution standards relaxed in Western countries, and people repeating their PR because it feeds into their own agenda. If you read the literature intended for people who actually have some association with the electric generating industry, you get a very different picture of what has been going on in China.
 
One of the reasons the farmers have been ' on the tax payers tit ' is because if they were free to play the same game as everyone else - What would happen ?

They would all say "**** this getting up at 4am , 7 days a week " , sell the farm to a property developer and spend the rest of their lives in their town house or second home in the Caribbean.

And the country would be truly ruined.
Yeah, that's part of the reason for subsidies.

Another reason is that most countries subsidise and there's little point competing against that.

The main one is, we want cheap food and as l said itis easier to subsidise 30k farms than 20m households.

All that being so, I'd still like a little bit of doing as they're fxxxxng told and being grateful from the pampered bastards.


Note: all of the above doesn't apply to small and tenant farmers. Especially livestock ones.

By the by, arable farms have fxxx all work to do half the year. You don't need to be up at 0345 to tend a potato in distress or milk the wheat
 
There are lots of farmers who do OK without any subsidy, and there is a strong body of support for binning the current single farm payment system.

The single biggest issue is that payment is made on a acreage not production.

Thus my chum, a young tenant farmer, gets nowt. Because the subsidy goes to the landowner and does not really get passed on.

Worse still is the use of subsidies to suppress initiatives on some pretext or other.

There are good landlords and there are less good landlords.

Well worth following the debate on the NF U website.

Indeed.

I make a very clear distinction between tenants and owners..... tenants tend to be treated very, very badly. Not all obviously but as a group they get kicked in the balls fairly regularly.

Farm owners on t'other hand are laughing all the way to the bank AND seem to want to lord it a bit.
 
Interestingly enough, the ones producing the fresh veg and salads,( and pig /poultry) aren't the ones drawing the money....
These are the places that easily slip into the category of 'Factory farms' we call em ''Intensive systems' so as not to scare the horses......

The money generally is focused nowadays on keeping the Countryside summat like folk imagine it should be....
It's about to get even more diverse, there's a serious train of thought thats thinking along the lines of...
"We'll 'rewild' most of the UK and buy our food from third countries like US, Oz, PRC etc. where environmental impact isn't our problem, after all were the sixth richest economy in the World, and food is cheap".....

Hmm.

Btw, the word 'Train' I subconsciously used is quite appropriate, Google how much 'Subsidy' the railways get in one form or another, last time I saw it was £7.1 billion, that's quite alot more than the £3.2 bill Ag. receives.
I do know of one or two farmers earning more than a train driver.....
I know of many many more earning less than the tax a train driver will pay on his wages!

Risk of serious thread... er... derail....


I'm sorry.


Good point though; the railways are caught in an ideological warp. Are they private businesses? Are they critical infrastructure enabling economic activity? Do they support rational policies about housing locations & carbon emissions? Should the investment in rail benefit UK providers or is lowest price the driver?


The current way of doing things looks like it was designed by a 7 year old who accidentally got smashed on Bailey's because it looked like milkshake. John Major are you reading this you tosser.
 
I have to say spec-op, I am muckers with a couple of farmers and whilst they have some acreage, sheds, property etc they have next to bugger all cash. All their clothes, private vehicles and lifestyles definitely do not speak of being wealthy. They graft like nobody else I know but I accept that’s only two blokes and their families. It could well be different up and down the country.

Tenants? Or owners? Arable? Or livestock?

Note also that it's a thing with farmers never ever to suggest in any circumstances that times aren't hard.
 
Anyone in the commercial window cleaning business needing a heated power washer system installed in a van. Allbright Cleaning located in Burnley builds the tanks from CNC'd parts he makes himself. The ex Army boy does the waterproof install himself too.

Not a bad lad is me brother, not as good looking or as hard as me but infinitely richer.
 
Apparently Gieves & Hawkes are commie owned: Famed Savile Row tailor Gieves and Hawkes - founded in 1771 - was sold to Hong Kong's Trinity Group in 2012 for an estimated £92.5 million.



Sorry it's the Sun. They do own rather a lot.
 
Not necessarily British but what brands belong on this list? Stuff you simply wouldn’t consider buying from anyone else?

<snip>
Quite a lot on that list is over-priced and/or not particularly good - Dyson (overpriced and not much better than many others now - I've had 2 or 3) and Le Creuset (cheap French cookware originally, now expensive lifestyle cookware).
 
I bought a complete set of AF/Metric King Dick OE and Ring spanner’s In the 70’s, over 40 very hard years of trade and car restoring use later, still going strong.
Tool porn:

 

Truxx

LE
Over the years I’ve spent a lot of time in posh people’s houses.

There are certain branded items that can be found in every aristo’s home. There was a Top Gear segment some years back explaining how they expect to buy something once and then never have to replace it.

I think this is a good mantra to live by. Buy cheap, buy twice.

Not necessarily British but what brands belong on this list? Stuff you simply wouldn’t consider buying from anyone else?

Duallit toasters.
Roberts radios.
Dyson vacuum cleaners.
Le Crueset pans.
Peugeot salt and pepper grinders.
Le Chameau wellies.
Miele kitchen appliances.
Stihl Chainsaws.
Honda quad bikes.
Clearview stoves.
Schoffel gilets.
Lavazza coffee.
Maglite torches.

Brands who have dropped off the list due to quality issues.

Land Rover.
Barbour.
Hunter wellies.
Strike Dyson vacuum cleaners off that list. Clever, effective, sh*t engineering. I cannot vouch for much else though as it all looks vaguely kitchenesqe. As an aside are Le Crueset not made in the far east these days? Not some sweaty bloke in a forge in Sheffield redcar or sunny that's for sure.

Meanwhile we use makita power tools. Guaranteed for three years, guaranteed to be in the scrap bin at 3 years and a couple of months.

That nice Mr Dyson has no interest whatsoever in making vacuum cleaners that last 25 years.

Kenwood Chef food mixers, however.

In a thousand years Time Team will be digging up Kenwood Chefs, plugging them in to a nearby wind turbine and knocking out a batch of sponge cakes before you can say Tony Robinson.
Risk of serious thread... er... derail....


I'm sorry.


Good point though; the railways are caught in an ideological warp. Are they private businesses? Are they critical infrastructure enabling economic activity? Do they support rational policies about housing locations & carbon emissions? Should the investment in rail benefit UK providers or is lowest price the driver?


The current way of doing things looks like it was designed by a 7 year old who accidentally got smashed on Bailey's because it looked like milkshake. John Major are you reading this you tosser.
The aptest description I heard (from senior railtrack exec) was that the railways are run by train enthusiasts who hate passengers.

Sorry

Customers
 

Truxx

LE
Apparently Gieves & Hawkes are commie owned: Famed Savile Row tailor Gieves and Hawkes - founded in 1771 - was sold to Hong Kong's Trinity Group in 2012 for an estimated £92.5 million.



Sorry it's the Sun. They do own rather a lot.
That's why I changed my tailors to Kashkett.
 
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