NOT made in PR China ....

This is an ' I'm Backing Britain ' resurrection Thread.

When the world went to shit recently, I stayed alone for a few weeks, didnt die, got a call from Bro who had done the same, hadnt died (obvs) and he said " Come up here, shoot a few hundred pigeons and lets plant stuff "

10 weeks later - still alive ( no thanks to PRC ) and I am now 8 lbs lighter, can vault fences again, can dig a ******* fast shell scrape and, instead, plant spuds and aubergines etc in it.....

I have discovered a love of getting back in touch with Nature - and benefiting my country - that is - MY COUNTRY - at the same time.

I will start you off - Made in Britain

Need a nice mower ?
Last you a lifetime and wont poison your parents.

Problems with weeds amongst your lettuce?

Burgon & Ball | Leading Garden Tools & Agricultural Supplies

As we start to realise what really matters, lets get British Industry going again.

Anyone know some other British skill worth saving / bringing back ?
 

4(T)

LE
Just "being British" could do with saving/ bringing back.


I do think the government really needs to impose a strict "country of origin" labelling system for goods and services, so that consumers can make an informed choice.

I'd certainly buy British-made tools and implements, if I could identify them. Too many famous brand names now just stickers on Chinese garbage.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Britool used to be a really good hand tool brand, it was sold to the French (Facom), maintained the quality but was sold as a 'second' brand, at some point Black & Decker / DeWalt got involved, now it's just a brand name put on average Chinese tat with a very limited warranty. At least Facom still make some of their stuff in France.
Part of the problem is that some of the 'British' stuff is assembled here with parts sourced from all over the world and little, if any UK manufactured components - Jaguar Land Rover are an example of this, the problem is, are we willing to pay the premium to have exclusively 100% British manufactured and assembled products again?
 
are we willing to pay the premium to have exclusively 100% British manufactured and assembled products again?
That question's been asked and answered a multitude of times at checkouts the length of the country. If it hadn't, we wouldn't have this thread in the first place.
 
Part of the problem is that some of the 'British' stuff is assembled here with parts sourced from all over the world and little, if any UK manufactured components - Jaguar Land Rover are an example of this,
via la luton!

 
Nope.

Since working from home I'm the purchaser of much Chinese tat. I've been buying from 'Light in the Box', I get the feeling that name works in mandarin but didn't work as well when put through the Chinese equivalent of google translate, and clearly (more on this later) wasn't passed through anyone who spoke English as a first, second or eighth language.
The site appears to be the Chinese equivalent of Amazon without the worry of mundane things like copyright infringement or intellectual property laws.
The first thing you see may not be the cheapest, there may be many vendors with unpronounceable names selling the same item a varying prices.

My first purchase was a new strap for my Samsung (made in Korea) watch, to replace the cheap rubber/silicon job it comes with. No instructions on how to remove links, but I found the metal tip of a clutch pencil pushed the pin out with the help of long-nosed pliers (Teng Tools who strangely are Swedish), did the job.
£20 of my English pounds

1592941640206.png


Next was a mobile phone holder for my desk, not necessary, but I'm into buying tat now.
No instructions needed for this item, but the box it comes in does note it is available in Blue, White or Pink, mine was ticked as Blue and arrived black as the one shown below, which fortunately was what I wanted.
£10.14 of my English pounds.

1592942700720.png


Now wireless ear 'buds', I want some but I'm not paying Samsung £199.00 for something I'm only occasionally going to use. I saw an advert on Facebook with a UK company selling a generic version that works with any blue-tooth enabled device for £39.99, bargain.
A quick search of chinky amazon and hay presto the exact same buds. I have noticed that when you turn them on Spotify immediately opens and it starts playing where you left off and you have no control over this, but for £14.27 who cares.

1592944293335.png


Fortunately, they connect easily with the phone as the instructions suffer from the same translation problems as the sites name.
20200623_211657_1600x1200.jpg
 

Yokel

LE
I think it is unlikely that you will found much with every single part having been made in Britain. Perhaps you should settle for 50% of the value being done here?

In almost everything, the final item is worth much more than the sum of the value of the components. Most of the value is in design, integration (ie final assembly) and sales/support.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I think it is unlikely that you will found much with every single part having been made in Britain. Perhaps you should settle for 50% of the value being done here?

In almost everything, the final item is worth much more than the sum of the value of the components. Most of the value is in design, integration (ie final assembly) and sales/support.
I was probably being a bit unfair to JLR, there's probably around 40% GB manufactured components used, the problem is we don't have a GB version of Bosch, Michelin or Brembo to boost the numbers.
 

Londo

LE
Just "being British" could do with saving/ bringing back.


I do think the government really needs to impose a strict "country of origin" labelling system for goods and services, so that consumers can make an informed choice.

I'd certainly buy British-made tools and implements, if I could identify them. Too many famous brand names now just stickers on Chinese garbage.
Bought a few sheets of sandpaper just a day before lockdown ' Stanley ' I thought used to be a good name . Was not until I got home I noticed the dreaded made in China . It was absolute crap and like tissue paper .
Never again .
 
A genuine thought: what do we as UK PLC actually export to the Chinese that is paid for as opposed to being stolen/copied/reverse engineered?

If it's not of vital economic value to the UK, then slapping massive tariffs on imported Chinese crap could hardly result in tit for tat shennanigans.
 
A genuine thought: what do we as UK PLC actually export to the Chinese that is paid for as opposed to being stolen/copied/reverse engineered?

If it's not of vital economic value to the UK, then slapping massive tariffs on imported Chinese crap could hardly result in tit for tat shennanigans.
They make huge amounts of small components at a price very few could compete with due to cheapish labour. If they switch that supply off, industry in this country would grind to a halt quickly.
 
A genuine thought: what do we as UK PLC actually export to the Chinese that is paid for as opposed to being stolen/copied/reverse engineered?

If it's not of vital economic value to the UK, then slapping massive tariffs on imported Chinese crap could hardly result in tit for tat shennanigans.
Let's suppose you buy a phone. The ARM CPU is designed in Britain and manufactured in Taiwan. The display and the RAM are made in South Korea and the battery is made in Japan. The operating system is made in the US, who also take a big rake off for the brand name, the advertising and marketing, and management overhead.

These parts then get shipped to an assembly line in China, where girls from rural villages live in barracks and get paid a few pence to assemble those bits and bobs together with glue and screwdrivers and put it into a box.

The finished phone then gets shipped to a cell phone operator in the UK, where customs and excise record the value of the whole thing as being imported from China.

You see "Made in China" on the back of the phone, but what you don't see is all the other countries who made all the other bits that went into it, each individual piece of which can easily be worth far more than what the Chinese sweatshop gets paid to do the final assembly.

In terms of who gets how much money from a phone that is nominally made in China, the South Koreans, Americans, and Japanese probably make far more money out of it than the Chinese do, and even the Taiwanese may get more than the Chinese.

The British take a cut from every ARM CPU in every phone made, as well as cut of a big percentage of the graphics GPUs. They also get paid to move the money around and handle the insurance.

So "Made in China", it doesn't mean what you think it means.
 
Just "being British" could do with saving/ bringing back.


I do think the government really needs to impose a strict "country of origin" labelling system for goods and services, so that consumers can make an informed choice.

I'd certainly buy British-made tools and implements, if I could identify them. Too many famous brand names now just stickers on Chinese garbage.
1-mg-zs-ev-2019-rt-hero-front.jpg


Agreed, seen the new MG ZS EV?

About as British as Peking duck!
 
A genuine thought: what do we as UK PLC actually export to the Chinese that is paid for as opposed to being stolen/copied/reverse engineered?

If it's not of vital economic value to the UK, then slapping massive tariffs on imported Chinese crap could hardly result in tit for tat shennanigans.
Another problem with import tariffs is they don’t harm the foreign exporter, they just make importing more expensive for the UK buyer. They would only work if we had equivalent manufacture within the UK who are able to compete with the tarrif price
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Anyone know some other British skill worth saving / bringing back ?
BMC

No, not that crowd from Cowley who made the Morris Minor, pay attention there!

The British Motorcycle Company !



This goes out to all those stouter born-again bikers happily tooling about on a machine made in Munich

( Bayerische Motoren Werke AG - aka BMW - who made a fortune selling aero engines to Goering and never looked back)


Gentlemen, get a grip - what are you thinking ?
 
Last edited:

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
A genuine thought: what do we as UK PLC actually export to the Chinese that is paid for as opposed to being stolen/copied/reverse engineered?

If it's not of vital economic value to the UK, then slapping massive tariffs on imported Chinese crap could hardly result in tit for tat shennanigans.
Range Rovers of every possible marque
Plenty plenty Jags you betchum
BMW 'Minis' - made in Oxford

Fahsands of 'em......

IMAG0747.jpg
 
Clarkes Shoes were ( once upon a time ) the epitome of quality.
And sustained a town in the SW England.
Then they moved it to Viet Nam.

OK Its not PR China BUT they both speak gjbberish and have
 
In 2018:

  • UK exports to China were worth £22.6 billion; imports from China were £44.7 billion, resulting in a trade deficit of -£22.1 billion.
  • The UK had a small surplus with China on trade in services, outweighed by a deficit on trade in goods.
  • China accounted for 3.5% of UK exports and 6.6% of all UK imports.
  • China was the UK’s sixth largest export market and fourth largest source of imports. UK trade with increased rapidly since the turn of the century – in 1999 China was the UK’s 26th largest export market and 15th largest source of imports.
 
Nope.

Since working from home I'm the purchaser of much Chinese tat. I've been buying from 'Light in the Box', I get the feeling that name works in mandarin but didn't work as well when put through the Chinese equivalent of google translate, and clearly (more on this later) wasn't passed through anyone who spoke English as a first, second or eighth language.
The site appears to be the Chinese equivalent of Amazon without the worry of mundane things like copyright infringement or intellectual property laws.
The first thing you see may not be the cheapest, there may be many vendors with unpronounceable names selling the same item a varying prices.

My first purchase was a new strap for my Samsung (made in Korea) watch, to replace the cheap rubber/silicon job it comes with. No instructions on how to remove links, but I found the metal tip of a clutch pencil pushed the pin out with the help of long-nosed pliers (Teng Tools who strangely are Swedish), did the job.
£20 of my English pounds

View attachment 484471

Next was a mobile phone holder for my desk, not necessary, but I'm into buying tat now.
No instructions needed for this item, but the box it comes in does note it is available in Blue, White or Pink, mine was ticked as Blue and arrived black as the one shown below, which fortunately was what I wanted.
£10.14 of my English pounds.

View attachment 484475

Now wireless ear 'buds', I want some but I'm not paying Samsung £199.00 for something I'm only occasionally going to use. I saw an advert on Facebook with a UK company selling a generic version that works with any blue-tooth enabled device for £39.99, bargain.
A quick search of chinky amazon and hay presto the exact same buds. I have noticed that when you turn them on Spotify immediately opens and it starts playing where you left off and you have no control over this, but for £14.27 who cares.

View attachment 484487

Fortunately, they connect easily with the phone as the instructions suffer from the same translation problems as the sites name.
View attachment 484488
The Peoples Republic of China. thanks you for supporting their economy during this difficult time.
 
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