Not a good week for Generals of the Modern British Army

Somebody explain to me how this is not thread drift?
Allow me.

The post above has invoked the SLR gambit, or indeed stratagem, which binds us all together from the highest General (who has most likely fired it, probably) to the lowliest currently serving Pte who can only dream of handling such awesomeness; the weapon that won the Cold War on its own without even having to fire a single shot.

Thread drift cannot occur if you mention THAT rifle. It is the single most unifying object in the universe.
 
Allow me.

The post above has invoked the SLR gambit, or indeed stratagem, which binds us all together from the highest General (who has most likely fired it, probably) to the lowliest currently serving Pte who can only dream of handling such awesomeness; the weapon that won the Cold War on its own without even having to fire a single shot.

Thread drift cannot occur if you mention THAT rifle. It is the single most unifying object in the universe.
It also means you are over fifty which puts you in the don't trust a fart / never waste an erection/ young people today don't know how good they've got it demographic...
 
The Red Book was ORs only. Offrs would write their own CVs.
Speaking as a retired OR, I write my own CVs as does every other retired OR that I know!! No civilian employer has shown the slightest interest in the pen picture that my last CO (Cheshires) wrote for me, although he did say lots of nice things and even managed to work the word 'polymath' into it.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
Allow me.

The post above has invoked the SLR gambit, or indeed stratagem, which binds us all together from the highest General (who has most likely fired it, probably) to the lowliest currently serving Pte who can only dream of handling such awesomeness; the weapon that won the Cold War on its own without even having to fire a single shot.

Thread drift cannot occur if you mention THAT rifle. It is the single most unifying object in the universe.
It hasn't drifted far enough yet in that the allyness of '58 Pattern belts has yet to be discussed.

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Sure about the link with the Glooms? He had an ex-Gloom as an ADC once, but never heard of him serving with them.
It's in the Military Wiki, so got to be right. It might well have been when he was at University!
His step father wrote 'Bugles and a Tiger' and was I think a Gurkha so surprised he didn't bag them as well.

The stepson of British author John Masters, Rose was educated at Cheltenham College, St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, and the Sorbonne. He was commissioned into the Gloucestershire Regiment Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve (TAVR) in 1959, and transferred to the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR) in 1962. He joined the Coldstream Guards in 1964.
 
That’s not true. Some companies have a policy of not giving references, others don’t. It’s perfectly allowable to both ask for and give a detailed reference.
I think you are confusing what is permitted in law and what actually happens in practice.

In any case a certificate of service is unlikely to answer the right questions.
 
Speaking as a retired OR, I write my own CVs as does every other retired OR that I know!! No civilian employer has shown the slightest interest in the pen picture that my last CO (Cheshires) wrote for me, although he did say lots of nice things and even managed to work the word 'polymath' into it.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
That's because writing "know it all" would have been rude.
 
Cardboard - on discharge from T&AVR late 1973.
Red hardback - on discharge from the ranks (and appointment to commission). Regular Army, mid 1974. I think the latter bears words - rubber stamped - to that effect. I've always assumed everybody on SMC 5 got one.
That brings back memories! I was SMC7 and got a red book too in 1975. I had a TAVR white cardboard one too.

Long gone, along with hair and some teeth!
 

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