Not a good week for Generals of the Modern British Army

IMHO a lot of employers don’t ask for a soldier’s Testimonial as they don’t know it exists. And a lot of service leavers don’t present their Testimonial because it isn’t asked for.

A well written testimonial should be a differentiator in a job selection process, certainly for the getting that vital first or second job. The problem is a lot of them are vanilla.
Most applications are online these days. If you get to interview then proof of quals is required. If considered for employment then references are followed up.

In some cases service experience can be quoted but mostly they don't seem to bother.

At least that has been my experience.
 
IMHO a lot of employers don’t ask for a soldier’s Testimonial as they don’t know it exists. And a lot of service leavers don’t present their Testimonial because it isn’t asked for.

A well written testimonial should be a differentiator in a job selection process, certainly for the getting that vital first or second job. The problem is a lot of them are vanilla.
A total irrelevance in the civilian job market where no one gives references other than to confirm employment with no reference to performance or character.
 
A total irrelevance in the civilian job market where no one gives references other than to confirm employment with no reference to performance or character.
That’s not true. Some companies have a policy of not giving references, others don’t. It’s perfectly allowable to both ask for and give a detailed reference.



Most applications are online these days. If you get to interview then proof of quals is required. If considered for employment then references are followed up.

In some cases service experience can be quoted but mostly they don't seem to bother.

At least that has been my experience.
Depends on the employer. Supporting documentation is often required up front with the application.
 
That’s not true. Some companies have a policy of not giving references, others don’t. It’s perfectly allowable to both ask for and give a detailed reference.




Depends on the employer. Supporting documentation is often required up front with the application.
Lots of companies (including mine) restrict the reference to dates of employment and job title.
 
In place of a reference? I'd assume that to be much more useful.
Not in place of, in addition to. Remember, a lot of references are useless; all they do is confirm employment dates and job title.

Put it another way, if you had a glowing testimonial covering several years of employment, wouldn’t you want to get it in front of a prospective employer?
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Put it another way, if you had a glowing testimonial covering several years of employment, wouldn’t you want to get it in front of a prospective employer?

Of course, but I'd rather a glowing reference specifically targeted at that job.
 
Put it another way, if you had a glowing testimonial covering several years of employment, wouldn’t you want to get it in front of a prospective employer?
Yes, but not if it meant forcing unwanted documentation on a busy interview panel who has no interest in it. If you can't give them what they want at interview are you the best applicant?
 
Yes, but not if it meant forcing unwanted documentation on a busy interview panel who has no interest in it. If you can't give them what they want at interview are you the best applicant?
Of course; why would you “force” anything on an employer? But what is wrong with saying “I can’t get you a reference for my time of the Army, but here’s my testimonial”?

I don’t think you can generalise on this. Every interview, job, employer etc etc is different. Just because you’ve never used yours doesn’t mean others haven’t.
 
A fair bit of worrying evident above (about military credentials, worth of pension etc). None that should really worry anyone at all; at your 'leaving all that behind' date, all you should be concerned about is the the cash in the bank - monthly from pensions etc and lumply from savings, capital etc. Rank, status and perceived self-worth are irrelevant. If you feel that your military status was fabulous and worth something in social esteem, congratulations, and well done.
But most military types are only military for their first career, and their second is - or should be - considerably more important in monetary and satisfaction terms; very few make General rank, and many of them even find that their next job is far more satisfying than their first. I was very - very - far from 'starred' when I left my first, but my pension was secured (late) on the second, and with many more good friends. Don't get sweaty about it.
 

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