Not a good week for Generals of the Modern British Army

Not a General, or not ever going to be one by the look of it, however, on theme someone else unable to keep it in his trousers or up his kilt. Rather a lot of this going on? In days of old would this sort of thing be kept 'in house'?


Apologies for reading the Daily wail.
 

An alternative view from across the pond.
 
Not a General, or not ever going to be one by the look of it, however, on theme someone else unable to keep it in his trousers or up his kilt. Rather a lot of this going on? In days of old would this sort of thing be kept 'in house'?


Apologies for reading the Daily wail.
Quite: this at least used the Telegraph.

 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Not a General, or not ever going to be one by the look of it, however, on theme someone else unable to keep it in his trousers or up his kilt. Rather a lot of this going on? In days of old would this sort of thing be kept 'in house'?


Apologies for reading the Daily wail.
In the Victorian age perhaps.
 
I used to work with an ex- HK HQ SO2 G1 (early 90s) he had to deal with a instance of murder which the unit (part of Gurkha Bde) was proposing to deal with ‘in house’.
Not quite the same - you're talking about the Brigade of Gurkhas who still live in the Victorian age and who think they are a different Army, a bit like the Guards (who are a different Army!)
 
I used to work with an ex- HK HQ SO2 G1 (early 90s) he had to deal with a instance of murder which the unit (part of Gurkha Bde) was proposing to deal with ‘in house’.
Which one is this? The decapitation or the grenade?

If the former, the individual went through civil court and served time on Lantau.

If the latter, IIRC they never caught the perpetrators
 
Not quite the same - you're talking about the Brigade of Gurkhas who still live in the Victorian age and who think they are a different Army, a bit like the Guards (who are a different Army!)
Well, strictly speaking they are different to the wider army.... They've been expanding in size across nearly all units and hoovering up unused PIDs.
 

Oyibo

LE
I used to work with an ex- HK HQ SO2 G1 (early 90s) he had to deal with a instance of murder which the unit (part of Gurkha Bde) was proposing to deal with ‘in house’.
The hand grenade incident?
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
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Interesting. While Caecilius in exchanges here has been frank, even forthright, and some debates have been on the lively side, I've not felt "bitter" or "vengeful" from that direction.

Which suggests that here, there are issues that are deep, significant, and not fit for more detailed discussion with court cases underway.
I deleted just before you put that up. I decided commenting even in general terms was probably a bad idea. Clearly I was milliseconds too late!
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
I deleted just before you put that up. I decided commenting even in general terms was probably a bad idea. Clearly I was milliseconds too late!
Might be true, so mine's gone too.
 
Which one is this? The decapitation or the grenade?

If the former, the individual went through civil court and served time on Lantau.

If the latter, IIRC they never caught the perpetrators
Heard about the grenade incident. But not the decapitation incident. What was that about? Did someone lose their head?
 
It's not just a problem for the Army but for society in general and it's one for which there is no easy or obvious solution: how do you put people in positions of authority within organisations without them using that authority for their own personal advantage rather than the interests of the organisation as a whole? The commercial and public sectors are rampant with it. Perhaps it was always thus, to a certain extent, but it seems to me that it was never quite this bad, a few decades ago there was probably more of a sense of "duty" amongst senior officers and senior managers alike, organisations were more "paternalistic" would be the modern term.
The Agency Dilemma, first postulated by Berle and Means 90 years ago in their book The Modern Corporation and Private Property. It manifest itself in business predominantly with those in authority awarding themselves and their acolytes excessive pay and bonuses. In the public sector it manifests in toxic behaviours towards promotion as the only way to achieve greater reward is to promote. Or at least it did; the proliferation of quangos And arms length organisations has created a culture that induces both.

Lots written about this. The stock answer is governance; the exemplar governance codes like the UK Corporate Governance Code are really all about managing the agency dilemma. But they introduce a whole raft of oversight committees and separations of power that are completely at odds with the principle of unity of command.

TBH I don’t think it’s got anything to do with paternalistic management styles or sense of duty, not least because Berle and Means identified the issue at a time when corporate leadership was similarly paternalistic and careers were for life. We are really talking about human nature.

So a hard nut to crack. I wonder if Agency Theory is discussed or taught at the Defence Leadership Centre?
 
Come on. I don't believe that. Call me 'Dave' said that he was going to have a' bonfire of the quangos' back in 2010. So we should have very few left now, if any, shouldn't we?
A bonfire of quangos is probably an attractive proposition to an aspiring Prime Minister wanting to make his mark. But once in power, the ability to operate at arms length and to be able to lay the blame on faceless public servants probably looks more attractive, particularly if you have a thin majority.

It’s all about governance....
 

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