Not a good week for Generals of the Modern British Army

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
That rather depends upon what kind of war you want to fight; what this lot seem to have forgotten is that the enemy also get a vote.
"An important difference between a military operation and a surgical operation is that the patient is not tied down. But it is a common fault of generalship to assume that he is." -- Captain Sir Basil H. Liddell Hart, often a bit of a twunt but being a stopped clock at the right moment on this occasion...
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
Of course, the requirement for a post-graduate degree to get past - Major, is it?- rather pisses on that particular portion of chips.
I've got my graduate BEng, a MSc and an MA - why am I only a part-time OF2? :)

(Yes, I can hear the chorus of "because you're a useless cµnt and everyone hates you" from here, thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week, try the veal...)
 
To me, there’s a fundamental difference between an executive leadership role and an advisory role.

Plus Cummings “indiscretion” was clearly based on a desire to protect his son rather than to exercise his cock.
Barnard Castle?
 
His influence is, however, advisory. He holds no executive power or responsibility. Big difference.
Yeah, he's not accountable to the electorate.
 
Air Marshall Peter Harding, the then CDS, and serial slapper Lady Buck. A cautionary tale but for the record, yes I would.
She looks like she likes it up her!
 
That’s very honest of you, and sad to say about something you obviously cared about. I have long struggled to have any automatic “respect” for leaders, both in the military and police and obviously politicians because of this type of behaviour and attitude.
Can't help feeling a little sad reading your remarks and those of others... I enlisted in the early 1960s, I suppose the moral standards of that era would be regarded as archaic in comparison to present day's.
Indeed, in retrospect, they were positively Edwardian... fair play, doing one's best, selflessness, integrity, moral courage, dedication to duty of care, etc., though underlying it all, to quote Baynes, was a harsh insistence on discipline, tempered with humanity.
We trusted senior officers, they seldom, if ever, betrayed that trust... their ethos filtered down to their juniors who continued in similar vein... I in turn attempted to emulate their example on commissioning.
I left the Army in the mid 1980s... those standards were still extant.... when did it all change?
 
The point I have made is that you are zeroed in on Johnson / Cummings like an exocet missile.

There is a certain vindictiveness, that suggests he jizzed in your coffee or something, when you howl that Cummings is unaccountable, when the exact same thing can be said about ALL Senior Advisors over the last 20 - 25 years.
Who have been sacked by their respective bosses when they became the story.
 
Can't help feeling a little sad reading your remarks and those of others... I enlisted in the early 1960s, I suppose the moral standards of that era would be regarded as archaic in comparison to present day's.
Indeed, in retrospect, they were positively Edwardian... fair play, doing one's best, selflessness, integrity, moral courage, dedication to duty of care, etc., though underlying it all, to quote Baynes, was a harsh insistence on discipline, tempered with humanity.
We trusted senior officers, they seldom, if ever, betrayed that trust... their ethos filtered down to their juniors who continued in similar vein... I in turn attempted to emulate their example on commissioning.
I left the Army in the mid 1980s... those standards were still extant.... when did it all change?
For me the early 80's.
 
I managed to get myself an SSC without A levels! It did mean doing RoCo, which on balance it would have been easier to crack a couple of A levels :p. However I had the background of actully doing a proper job before joining.

So even though I was a thickie non-grad, the Army did very kindly ensure I obtained Post Grad Diploma, plus a raft of other now very useful quals. and some not so useful ones.
Snap, an SSC with three dubious O level passes at A level. Being a dyslexic in the 70s was a bugger! However as Blair said things could only get better, which they did.
 
Can't help feeling a little sad reading your remarks and those of others... I enlisted in the early 1960s, I suppose the moral standards of that era would be regarded as archaic in comparison to present day's.
Indeed, in retrospect, they were positively Edwardian... fair play, doing one's best, selflessness, integrity, moral courage, dedication to duty of care, etc., though underlying it all, to quote Baynes, was a harsh insistence on discipline, tempered with humanity.
We trusted senior officers, they seldom, if ever, betrayed that trust... their ethos filtered down to their juniors who continued in similar vein... I in turn attempted to emulate their example on commissioning.
I left the Army in the mid 1980s... those standards were still extant.... when did it all change?
I gave you a like for that, but respectfully suggest you remove your rose-tinted spectacles! I served from the early 1970s until final retirement last year.
You’re right, we had some brilliant, inspirational leaders of men and women back then (not all officers!), but we also had many spectacularly inept and in some cases, criminal so-called leaders too!
I suspect it remains pretty much the same situation in the modern Army
 
Senior Officer, cuts own detail and behaves like self serving, self entitled, above the rules, superior c*nt.

The only surprising thing about that is that people are surprised about it :)
 
There was an Al Thani in my platoon at Sandhurst.

He was back-termed for terminal idleness and subsequently disowned.
Was that SMC 12, he the one that took a Platoon to Claridges for their final platoon party. Having first given a Jensen Interceptor to his C/Sgt which had a blown gasket, a case of vintage wine to the Company Commander and a Rolex to his Pl Cmdr. This was not quite frowned on but it was 1976 after all.
 
Can't help feeling a little sad reading your remarks and those of others... I enlisted in the early 1960s, I suppose the moral standards of that era would be regarded as archaic in comparison to present day's.
Indeed, in retrospect, they were positively Edwardian... fair play, doing one's best, selflessness, integrity, moral courage, dedication to duty of care, etc., though underlying it all, to quote Baynes, was a harsh insistence on discipline, tempered with humanity.
We trusted senior officers, they seldom, if ever, betrayed that trust... their ethos filtered down to their juniors who continued in similar vein... I in turn attempted to emulate their example on commissioning.
I left the Army in the mid 1980s... those standards were still extant.... when did it all change?
I don't doubt this was the perception. I just doubt it was the truth.
 
I gave you a like for that, but respectfully suggest you remove your rose-tinted spectacles! I served from the early 1970s until final retirement last year.
You’re right, we had some brilliant, inspirational leaders of men and women back then (not all officers!), but we also had many spectacularly inept and in some cases, criminal so-called leaders too!
I suspect it remains pretty much the same situation in the modern Army
I suppose the criminals and lunatics got the G2 brass salvage, Training area and bottle major appointments. The modern army has less dark corners where liabilities can be posted until they reach pensionable age.
 
@halo_jones, edited to add the following, taken from the BBC:

Emergency loans for universities about to go bust

Universities would be expected to end courses seen as being of "low value", with an emphasis on either high-quality research or courses with good job prospects.

Vocational and higher technical courses could be encouraged - and universities would be expected to offer courses more closely linked to the local economy.


Film Studies, Media Studies, Sociology, etc. combined with appropriate level of indoctrination will no longer be offered. Once the ball starts rolling at a small number of institutions, it will continue to accelerate. The Teacher Training bursary scheme provides an example i.e. you get the largest bursary for the most in-demand subjects.
I hinted about this a week or two ago, lot of redundancies about.
 
I hinted about this a week or two ago, lot of redundancies about.
Some Universities sadly don't deserve be called that and should be allowed to go down. That will force some of the more politically anxy lecturers to get real jobs, and their students to get an apprenticeship or real trade.
 
Some Universities sadly don't deserve be called that and should be allowed to go down. That will force some of the more politically anxy lecturers to get real jobs, and their students to get an apprenticeship or real trade.
It will also reduce the number of Vice Chancellor‘s on obscene salaries too - win/win.
Funny how they were never paid those sort of salaries before the introduction of University fees.
 

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