Norton Motorcycles being wound up.

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
One of the things about the internet, is the vast gaps in knowledge, probably because folk of a certain generation are not bothered about posting stuff
you need to read books
I was trying to find the name of a chap who went around the world on a 1928 model 19 Norton, he is not listed on wikipedia or anywhere obvious, so I dug out an old reference book
His name was John Masterman, his motorcycle a 500cc Norton which carried him over half a million miles on his globe trotting adventures, and stimulated many younger motorcycles to travel on their bikes
Radco dedicated his fine book , The Vintage Motorcyclists Workshop to the Memory of John Masterman in 1985
itself a fascinating treasure trove of hard won skills and engineering tips when dealing with motorcycles long out of production


"Cut your miles a day down from 300 to 200, and 200 to 100 or even less.
Ride and rest - and ride again. Never give it up. Never say die.
Never part from an interest and love that is life itself."

( John Masterman)

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I wonder how many bikes were irretrievably damaged after the fire at the NMM? I know the term 'physically sick' is much overused these days, but when I saw pictures of its aftermath I truly did feel ill.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I wonder how many bikes were irretrievably damaged after the fire at the NMM? I know the term 'physically sick' is much overused these days, but when I saw pictures of its aftermath I truly did feel ill.
what was nice, was the response of the motorcycle community
nearly all of the machines have now been restored, people donated very rare spares, specialists reproduced parts using other motorcycles as a pattern, all the old fashioned way
the only real sad thing was that A no sprinklers had been fitted, and that some scum broke in and stole all the irreplaceable silverware
All credit to the late Roy Richards who has done so much to preserve a valuable part of our motorcycle and engineering heritage
 
what was nice, was the response of the motorcycle community
nearly all of the machines have now been restored, people donated very rare spares, specialists reproduced parts using other motorcycles as a pattern, all the old fashioned way
the only real sad thing was that A no sprinklers had been fitted, and that some scum broke in and stole all the irreplaceable silverware
All credit to the late Roy Richards who has done so much to preserve a valuable part of our motorcycle and engineering heritage
You mean the same Roy Richards whose penny pinching led to the destruction of a valuable part of our motorcycling and engineering heritage.
 
You mean the same Roy Richards whose penny pinching led to the destruction of a valuable part of our motorcycling and engineering heritage.
And there was me thinking it was the “head in the sand” mentally of the management at NORTON VILLIERS TRIUMPH refusing to invest or looking at what the Japanese were producing.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
You mean the same Roy Richards whose penny pinching led to the destruction of a valuable part of our motorcycling and engineering heritage.
but for his actions, we would not have had such a collection, most of it would have been purchased and stored away by investors, never seen never ridden
Many people donated motorcycles, parts, clothing, literature and documents to the museum, if he had not opened it, as that older generation passed on most of it would have been skipped, or snapped up by the meerschaum pipe brigade and sold on to other countries at a vast profit
He had to built the museum on a very tight budget with very little funding, and was heavily opposed because it was not London Centric
by the time of the fire he had little to do with it, the management was at fault for employing staff that smoked, and allowing smoking anywhere near the building
I visited a collection in Italy, very private, no photos either, if you smoked you have to surrender your cigarettes and lighter before you went any where near the collection
 
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