Norton Motorcycles being wound up.

That was rather unpleasant to read. So rather than being a "niche yuppie market" it looks like the factory just couldn't keep up with demand leading to rushed production and a drop in quality. Bad press and customers unhappy at delivery delay only adds up to the dire state of affairs Norton have now got themselves into.
A great lesson for future business studies grads as an example of how not to run a company with a very saleable product.
Shame really.
 

Yokel

LE
I wonder should this thread be moved to the Economics forum - or perhaps I should include a link on the 'Manufacturing in the UK' thread?

Surely everyone involved with manufacturing should be aware of the fact that Quality is King - how many times does this need to be pressed home. One of the reasons for the decline of British motorcycle manufacturing was the issue of Quality (lack of) and unreliability - so when a biker saw his mate with a Honda that never broke down, unlike his British made bike...

What happened to the UAV engine part of the business?
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I wonder should this thread be moved to the Economics forum - or perhaps I should include a link on the 'Manufacturing in the UK' thread?

Surely everyone involved with manufacturing should be aware of the fact that Quality is King - how many times does this need to be pressed home. One of the reasons for the decline of British motorcycle manufacturing was the issue of Quality (lack of) and unreliability - so when a biker saw his mate with a Honda that never broke down, unlike his British made bike...

What happened to the UAV engine part of the business?
Late 60s early 90s they were involved in Wankel rotary development for UAVs, and of course they used one in the motorcycles


I spoke to some one yesterday who used to own one of the new Nortons, he had a high flying job so the money was not a problem, he only kept it a few years as the finish was not very good, and needed constant attention

still overpriced yuppie shite though
 
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Didn't Vincent make engines for flying machines for a while?
The only Vincent I ever managed to grab cost me a £5.
Vincent Versatiller, got it from the local scrappy, took it to bits to sort it, there, cast in the back of the crankcase, was Vincent. Oooh, I nearly swooned.
 

Attachments

Interesting read, Jim is also attempting to manufacture a Land Rover Defender alternative, the Grenadier. So if he's serious the plant could manufacture various lumps.

£650M & 10,000 jobs, the capacity is certainly there.

Excuse my source but the relevant info is there.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Didn't Vincent make engines for flying machines for a while?
The only Vincent I ever managed to grab cost me a £5.
Vincent Versatiller, got it from the local scrappy, took it to bits to sort it, there, cast in the back of the crankcase, was Vincent. Oooh, I nearly swooned.
nearly
they made 2 stroke engines for lifeboats that were set into a pod under the air frame
if air crew were stuck miles from rescue in a dinghy, they dropped the folding life boat and the crew could fire it up and head home
they have one in the RAF Museum at Hendon
 
I wonder should this thread be moved to the Economics forum - or perhaps I should include a link on the 'Manufacturing in the UK' thread?

Surely everyone involved with manufacturing should be aware of the fact that Quality is King - how many times does this need to be pressed home. One of the reasons for the decline of British motorcycle manufacturing was the issue of Quality (lack of) and unreliability - so when a biker saw his mate with a Honda that never broke down, unlike his British made bike...

What happened to the UAV engine part of the business?

When Honda started turning up, BSA bought a Benley and looked at it… and came to the conclusion they were cheap and nasty - pressed steel frames - and needlessly complex - a twin cylinder, electric start 4 speed OHC 125! Oh teh lulz.

Alas, that 125 was turning out 4 x more power than BSA's equivalent Bantam and was light years more reliable. Honda had absolutely grasped Demings work :
  1. Cease dependence on inspection to achieve quality. Eliminate the need for massive inspection by building quality into the product in the first place.
Honda didn't build its most basic Cub any less well than its top of the range bikes, they were all made right - middle tolerance parts throughout. Buy a part for a 60 year old Cub and it WILL fit straight in, first time, no question. The British? They were convinced that the sight of dozens of men busy with files on the production lines individually fitting parts was a sign of 'handbuilt quality' - they even proudly used pictures of them doing it in their brochures - it wasn't, it was 'Bash to fit, file to hide' crap engineering at its worst. In theory say a Bantam was a Bantam, and the parts were interchangeable… good luck with that! If you take one apart, you can see file marks all over the innards.
Same with British cars… better cars gearboxes? You had big boxes of gears and mixed and matched them to get the bits into some sort of tolerance - no two boxes ever the same. Japanese cars? All parts were the same, you could take a dozen Datsun gearboxes apart and mix up the parts, and they would all fit back together, perfectly within tolerance.
 

Blogg

LE
Yes, I read something today. Tax offenders involved somewhere along the line, the pension funds moved around. A tangled web.
Some very ugly claims being made. SFO and Pensions Regulator limbering up


One small question that needs an answer is what a struggling motorcycle maker always holding it's hand out for Government cash and allegedly siphoning staff pension funds was doing with six Aston Martins, three Range Rovers and an F Type Jaguar on the balance sheet.

Larger ones surround pretty much everything else

 

Yokel

LE
As many business related threads have noted, cash is the lifeblood of any business, and hemmorage results in shock and eventually death. When the human body is in that situation it responds by shutting down processes not needed for immediate survival and making sure blood gets to the vital organs.

Why do businesses at risk not do the same?
 
I’ve only just read this in MCN from this week.

It seems, who ever gave the order at the factory is right in it. A customer brought and received one of the 1200V4 RRs, he had to send the bike back to the factory for warranty work. Leaking tank and paint lifting. He’d been a couple of dates for when the bike would be ready, then the shit hit the fan. He contacted the Ombudsman and found out his bike had been stripped in the factory! All he had left of his bike was the frame and engine, where the rest went nobody seems to no! Top of the range Ohlins forks and shock, someone got a nice back handler!!!
 
I’ve only just read this in MCN from this week.

It seems, who ever gave the order at the factory is right in it. A customer brought and received one of the 1200V4 RRs, he had to send the bike back to the factory for warranty work. Leaking tank and paint lifting. He’d been a couple of dates for when the bike would be ready, then the shit hit the fan. He contacted the Ombudsman and found out his bike had been stripped in the factory! All he had left of his bike was the frame and engine, where the rest went nobody seems to no! Top of the range Ohlins forks and shock, someone got a nice back handler!!!
when I came ashore in the 80’s, I went engineering contracting. One of the jobs we used to get was helping seizing businesses for the receivers - plenty of that at the time. It was a game of who got in and strong armed the place first, us or the management. One trick was to turn up in a couple of service vans to ‘do some work’, disable the fork lifts, change the padlocks, accidentally park your vans to block the directors car park.... then, phone call and the receivers came with the winding up warrant and the muscle. If it went right, everyone would charge out to confront the receivers and the muscle, and we’d lock ourselves in with the stock and machinery. If it went wrong, it could be a bit ‘exciting’.
one thing that was always noticable was how much stuff was being boxed up in a firm heading for the rocks, being disappeared.
 

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