Normandy

#25
Go to the American Cemetery at St. Laurent. Then stand at the top edge of the cliff. Makes it easy to see why Omaha was such a problem....

I have been to the Cemetary and looked down from the viewing point, cemetary is imprseeive and immaculate but the thing that made the biggest impression on me was standing at the low water line and looking the other way

There is also a small museum musée du débarquement dday omaha - Vierville-sur-Mer near there that I found one of the best in the area
Was some time ago though
 
#26
I have been to the Cemetary and looked down from the viewing point, cemetary is imprseeive and immaculate but the thing that made the biggest impression on me was standing at the low water line and looking the other way

There is also a small museum musée du débarquement dday omaha - Vierville-sur-Mer near there that I found one of the best in the area
Was some time ago though

I've only seen it from the point of view of the German defenders at the top of the cliff. If I can get over to Normandy again. I'll try and get down to the water line to see the cliffs as the Americans would have seen them. Thanks.
 
#27
Go to the American Cemetery at St. Laurent. Then stand at the top edge of the cliff. Makes it easy to see why Omaha was such a problem....
I have been to the Cemetary and looked down from the viewing point, cemetary is imprseeive and immaculate but the thing that made the biggest impression on me was standing at the low water line and looking the other way

There is also a small museum musée du débarquement dday omaha - Vierville-sur-Mer near there that I found one of the best in the area
Was some time ago though
when we went the gates were locked at a very early time in the evening so anyone going needs to check.
 
#28
I've only seen it from the point of view of the German defenders at the top of the cliff. If I can get over to Normandy again. I'll try and get down to the water line to see the cliffs as the Americans would have seen them. Thanks.
Best done very early in the morning but obviously the tide has to be right
It really must have been like shooting fish in a barrel
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#29
Maisie battery.
The museum on Omaha beach.
Melville gun battery.

There’s also a massive OP tower at ouistrrham that’s worth a visit.

Edit. I forget the name of it but there’s four big above ground grub emplacements on top of a cliff. Ex French naval guns.
Done the Tower at Ouistrehamm quite impressive.

Especially as lived on Orkney and quite familiar with many of our coastal defences there. The difference in build between late 30's UK and early 40's occupied France is something that has to be seen to be believed.

Ours the concrete is inches thick, the German is feet thick. There were even some on Orkney which are dry stone built.
 
#31
Done the Tower at Ouistrehamm quite impressive.

Especially as lived on Orkney and quite familiar with many of our coastal defences there. The difference in build between late 30's UK and early 40's occupied France is something that has to be seen to be believed.

Ours the concrete is inches thick, the German is feet thick. There were even some on Orkney which are dry stone built.

Ze German's knew from the outset that their fortifications were going to face 15 and 16 inch guns.
Orkney's were far less likely to have big guns lobbing several tons at a time at them
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#32
So re-finding the book, research of the units involved. Then trying to find war diaries, then forming a route plan. Should be fun.
We should have access to where your books are stored middle of next month when we start packing for the game fair!
 
#33
Not a problem OC house caught me turning the house upside down, asked why. Today a package turned up with said book from amazon.

They are for you not storage.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#34
Not a problem OC house caught me turning the house upside down, asked why. Today a package turned up with said book from amazon.

They are for you not storage.
Guns included?
 
#35
Thanks for the replies folks.

I have decided to try and do the whole D-Day to VE day journey of one division (though the division I have chosen did not land on D-Day). Many moons ago I read a book about the 11th Black Bull division. I recall they had quite an exciting time.

So re-finding the book, research of the units involved. Then trying to find war diaries, then forming a route plan. Should be fun.
The book you're recollecting is The Black Bull by Patrick De La Force.

The 11th Armoured Div was made up of the following units:

29th Armoured Brigade consisting of: 23rd Hussars, 3rd RTR, 2nd Fife & Forfar Yeomanry, 8th Battalion Rifle Brigade,

159th Infantry Brigade consisting of: 1st Battalion Cheshire Regt, 3rd Battalion Monmouthshire Regt, 4th Battalion Kings Shropshire Light Infantry, 1st Battalion Herefordshire Regt.

Divisional units: 2nd Independent MG Coy Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. 13th (HAC) Regt RA, 151st Fld Regt RA (Ayrshire Yeomanry) TA, 75th AT Regt RA, 58th LAA Regt RA, 15th/19th The Kings Royal Hussars, 2nd Northamptonshire Yeomanry, 13th Field Squadron, Royal Engineers, 612th Field Squadron, Royal Engineers, 147th Field Park Squadron, Royal Engineers, 10th Bridging Platoon, Royal Engineers, 11th Armoured Divisional Signals Regiment.

Attached unit: Inns of Court Regt, whom From 1943, it was under the direct command of I Corps, the assault formation of 21 Army Group and later led the advance of 11th Armd Div.

11th-Armoured-chart.jpg


There is also a book written not long after the war ended called Taurus Pursuant (A History of the 11th Armoured Division). The story goes that every surviving member of the Division received a copy of this book. There could be some truth in this as my Grandfathers copy has his rank and name written in pencil on one of the front pages

My Grandfather was in the 58th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment Royal Artillery.
 
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#37
Done the Tower at Ouistrehamm quite impressive.

Especially as lived on Orkney and quite familiar with many of our coastal defences there. The difference in build between late 30's UK and early 40's occupied France is something that has to be seen to be believed.

Ours the concrete is inches thick, the German is feet thick. There were even some on Orkney which are dry stone built.
The thing that got me about the tower was it was bypassed and thought not to have anybody in there.

It wasn’t until something like D +3 that some plucky young RE subaltern stuck his head in and realised it was still manned.

Ouistreham Stp08

World War II museum D-Day Normandy 1944 Atlantic Wall
 
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#39
Doesn’t open up for me, but this one may be of use.

Azeville


I remember as a kid going on holiday to Normandy. Lots of proud guys in their 70s on the ferry in blazers.

I remember speaking to an elderly French woman in a village who welcomed us because it was a Scottish regiment who liberated the village.

I go to the museaums and see photos taken in the 80s and 90s of veterans on holiday in the area and see images of powerful men who had gone to war, survived and had worked hard for their families and we’re reflecting be in retirement.

Sadly, those sights are becoming rarer and rarer.
 
#40
Villers Bocage - worth popping into. My grandad was an anti-tank gunner there.
 

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