No places on Specialist training for Drs returning from war

#1
I have heard a 'Rumour' that the GDMOs coming back from recent Ops are being told that there are no specialist training posts for them? (and ones that didn't go on ops.

Rumour is the Army is going to string them out until their commissions run out.

What is going on? Not the best way to treat people who have been saving lifes only recently.

I have heard the Army will rely on TA consultants instead?
 
#2
steptoe said:
I have heard a 'Rumour' that the GDMOs coming back from recent Ops are being told that there are no specialist training posts for them? (and ones that didn't go on ops.

Rumour is the Army is going to string them out until their commissions run out.

What is going on? Not the best way to treat people who have been saving lifes only recently.

I have heard the Army will rely on TA consultants instead?
You should champion this on their behalf with the surgeon general!

I'm sure the action situation is a lot more complicated thanyou may realise... NOT everyone can specialist.
 
#3
steptoe said:
I have heard a 'Rumour' that the GDMOs coming back from recent Ops are being told that there are no specialist training posts for them? (and ones that didn't go on ops.

Rumour is the Army is going to string them out until their commissions run out.

What is going on? Not the best way to treat people who have been saving lifes only recently.

I have heard the Army will rely on TA consultants instead?
Pretty much answered your own question there big lad - rumour, rumour and ................. oh yes, I have heard.....

Give it a couple of weeks and the Gubment will tell us all :)
 
#4
I heard it was the team medics saving the lives.....in the "War"

Self prescribe some anti rumour pills, are you sure it was string out and not string up? comms check....

Are cadetships free these days?
 
#5
Not every doctor can get onto a specialist training program, many don't. Having deployed does not guarantee that any doctor has the qualifications, the courses or the academic credentials to progress.

However, I was under the impression that the military didn't deploy doctors who weren't already pretty far up the specialist training path.
 
#6
Do you mean all GDMOs aren't able to specialise OR that GDMOs without certain credentials/grades/etc aren't able to? Worrying
 
#7
Renal said:
Not every doctor can get onto a specialist training program, many don't. Having deployed does not guarantee that any doctor has the qualifications, the courses or the academic credentials to progress.

However, I was under the impression that the military didn't deploy doctors who weren't already pretty far up the specialist training path.
You deploy as a GDMO before specialist training and then don't deploy during specialist training so as to avoid any disruption to yor education.

I'd be suprised if they're doing this to guys who're good enough to earn a post as a registrar. The RAMC is desperately short of doctors and is currently willing to give a lot of money to people who sign up with them so it seems odd that they would screw over large numbers of their MOs.
 
#8
Dunno about the Army but apparently medics from another branch were told that they could well be offered a choice of an early discharge (i.e. out of their cadetship requirement) or another year of GDMO jobs and reapply the year after if they don't get a training post. Seems fair enough.
 
#9
The problem essentially lies outside DMS: the days of limitless training posts is long gone - for everybody. All specialist training is done in NHS and there is a national shortage of training posts (and a scandalously inefficient -ie newly computerised - application and appointment system) so a proportion of all doctors will fail to get a place. The shortfall is shared equally, ie the proportion not securing a post is same for DMS as it is for NHS.
 
#12
From what I've heard, it depends what you want to do, but yes essentially there are now bugger all training posts, non in some specialties. Worse in the Navy than it is for army, and we're still waiting to hear what will happen if you don't get onto training, an extra year as GDMO then trying again and being booted out have both been mentioned. Atleast in the NHS you can go to the next round and get a job in a deanery you don't really want to be in, unless you're really crap. The military will benchmark in the top 10% of their NHS counterparts but only have the one deanery to apply to - so you can be very good but not get a job. Will be interesting to see how it pans out. Who knows, if the survey saying ?<1/3 seniors want to resign is true, there may be some gaps....
I don't really understand how in less than a couple of years they've gone from showing data saying they're 50% understaffed to saying there are no training posts in the same area, but that's the army for you I guess...
 
#14
There is also the deployability question I suppose, how many of those specialties actually deploy?

Gynae & Obs, Opthamology & ENT as examples, probably more..

The role 4 is well and truly covered by NHS, so therefore "are these specialties needed" if they are not deploying? I believe Entirity will have a big say in this.

Not sure about anaesthetics, I know they deploy but don't know the numbers..

EM / A&E along with GP are probably the most need, but like the original post says, its rumour. It could be well worth donning your body armour SDR also.
 
#15
Why do they need to offer such training posts when they believe that the TA will step up and fill these gaps. To some extent this is true. So Reg GDMOs would have given a few years to the Army inc some tours to be at the same point in their career as they were at the end of F2.

Seems to me (and just my opinion) that these people have been used and decieved.
I doubt many would have taken that gamble if they were told before joining that they may have to go back to F2 and apply to the NHS when they were no longer required to be shot at.
 
#16
Erm welcome to the British Army....every soldier and Officer that joins is a volunteer!!! When your expiry date is up and you are no longer required, you are retired and the next guy fills your boots.

Thats a fact of the matter, what makes a GDMO any different from any other serving soldier or Officer in the British Army?

Or is it the case that GDMO's of today see themselves as the exception and they are in some way special?

There is a simple solution I believe, back in my day (long since retired) if you were not happy with your situation you could sign off and give 12 months statutary notice....or yo could PVR and pay to get out.

From what you have said regarding specialist posts not being available then the Army must be full, in which case pointing the PVR gun at your own head in an attempt to hold APC to ransom probably won't work....have fun in the NHS!!
 
#17
A lot of the GDMOs will have come off cadetships, meaning they have another 5 years return of service to do following the GDMO time (or pay back everything). So the potential options are - be forced into an area of training you really don't want (complete waste of time and money for all involved), carry on as a GDMO for...ooh, goodness knows how long, or be released by the army back into the mess that is MMC where you'll probably struggle to get a job due to having completed both too much and too little training (which I think they'll probably have to start doing). TBH, the only reason I can see for signing up as a reg MO at the moment is for the GDMO experience. Far more sensible to be in the TA, get into the specialist training you want and feel part of the regimental family, rather than being shafted and posted out to MDHUs where you could work as a civvi anyway.
I think many people (certainly I did) signed up when they were saying they were desparately understaffed, and so there was a good chance you would get on to the training you wanted. As I said before, this changed massively in the last year or so. MOs don't go into the army expecting an easy road to consultancy, everyone is aware that there is a lot of competition for posts and always has been, and accepts that you may have to train in something that isn't your first choice - but when there is non or only one training post for large specialties, and with that not changing in the foreseeable future,with 40+ doctors to find posts for it shows something has gone wrong with workforce planning.
 

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