No hope for clippers homecoming

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by PartTimePongo, Feb 6, 2006.

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  1. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/wear/4683044.stm


    http://www.sunderlandmaritimeheritage.org.uk/adelaide.htm

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Gets worse. Report on Radio Scot that owners want the dock area for development and museum will have to go to.......?
     
  3. Lottery Heritage funding? If this old girl can be restored to her former glory, why don't the adapt her as a cruise vessel I'm sure some would love to sail on the oldest clipper afloat.
     
  4. You should have seen the state of this boat bfore they brought it back and restored it

    Name: SS Great Britain
    Certificate number: 76
    Status:
    Core Collection

    Function:
    Passenger Vessel

    Sub Functional Area:

    Type:

    Location:
    Bristol, Bristol, England

    Current use:
    Museum: dry berth

    Length Overall:
    98.15 metres (321.80 feet)

    Gross Tonnage:
    3443.00

    Net Tonnage:
    1016.00




    Web address
    http://www.ss-great-britain.com/

    Builder
    1843, W Patterson, Wapping Wharf, Bristol, Bristol
    History
    When she was built in the nineteenth century the SS GREAT BRITAIN was a bold attempt by a British company to break the American monopoly of the trans-Atlantic passenger trade. Launched by Prince Albert on 19 July 1843, she was the largest and most technically innovative shop of her day. Her first voyage to America began on 26 July 1845, and she covered 3,100 miles in 14 days 21 hours. On the return journey, because of the loss of propeller blades, she used sail only, but still completed the voyage to Liverpool in 20 days. In 1846, however, on her fifth voyage, she ran aground Dundrum Bay, County Down. It was not until August of the following year that she was refloated and towed back to Liverpool, and was, in 1850 sold to Gibbs, Bright & Co. for service to Australia. She was significantly altered at this time. In 1854, she was refitted as a troopship for the Crimean War, and again in 1857 she carried reinforcements to Bombay to deal with the Indian Mutiny. Returning to the Australian run, she carried first touring English cricket side. In 1876, she was put up for sale at Birkenhead, but not bought until 1882. Her new owners, Anthony Gibbs, Sons & Co. converted her entirely to a sailing vessel for transporting coal to San Francisco and returning with wheat. After two such voyages, in 1886 she was dismasted by a hurricane off Cape Horn and she put into the Falkland Islands. As repairs were considered too expensive, she became a hulk for storing coal and wool. On April 14th 1937 she was towed a few miles out of Port Stanley to shallow water in Sparrow Cove; holes were punched in her bottom and she settled on the seabed. The organisation required to co-ordinate the task of recovery came into being in 1968, led by Dr Ewan Corlett. In April 1970 she was refloated, returning to her original dock Bristol in July that year. She is currently undergoing a major conservation programme.

    1839 - 1854, Passenger Vessel
    1854 - 1857, Troop Ship
    1860 - 1876, Passenger Vessel
    1876 - 1886, Cargo Vessel
    1886 - 1927, Hulk
    1927 - 1970, Hulk
    Previous names
    Bibliography
    1971, The SS Great Britain Official Guide, The Macmillan Press Ltd
    Lumsden, Robert J, 1975, Brunel's Three Great Ships, Ships Monthly, December, pp. 22-27
    1975, Ships Preserved: No 6 Brunel's Great Britain, Ships Monthly, June, pp. 34
    Corlett, E C B, 1975, The Stranding of the SS Great Britain in Dundrum Bay, Mariner's Mirror, Vol. 61, pp. 117-126
    Sullivan, Dick, 1978, Old Ships, Boats and Maritime Museums, pp. 11, Coracle Books
    1983, The 'Great Britain'; Progress Report, Sea Breezes, July, pp. 471-473
    Greenhill, Basil and Allington, Peter, 1985, The SS Great Britain as the world's first six-masted schooner, Maritime Wales, Vol. 9, Gwynedd Archive Services
    Blake, Joe, 1989, Restoring the Great Britain, RedCliffe Press Ltd
    Brouwer, Norman J, 1993, International Register of Historic Ships, pp. 152, Edition: 2, Anthony Nelson
    Bruzelius, Lars, 1995, Great Britain, World Wide Web Page, 28th August, Lars_Bruzelius@udac.uu.se
    2001, Matthew joins Great Britian, Classic Boat, Dec
     
  5. You should have seen the state of this boat bfore they brought it back and restored it

    Name: SS Great Britain
    Certificate number: 76
    Status:
    Core Collection

    Function:
    Passenger Vessel

    Sub Functional Area:

    Type:

    Location:
    Bristol, Bristol, England

    Current use:
    Museum: dry berth

    Length Overall:
    98.15 metres (321.80 feet)

    Gross Tonnage:
    3443.00

    Net Tonnage:
    1016.00




    Web address
    http://www.ss-great-britain.com/

    Builder
    1843, W Patterson, Wapping Wharf, Bristol, Bristol
    History
    When she was built in the nineteenth century the SS GREAT BRITAIN was a bold attempt by a British company to break the American monopoly of the trans-Atlantic passenger trade. Launched by Prince Albert on 19 July 1843, she was the largest and most technically innovative shop of her day. Her first voyage to America began on 26 July 1845, and she covered 3,100 miles in 14 days 21 hours. On the return journey, because of the loss of propeller blades, she used sail only, but still completed the voyage to Liverpool in 20 days. In 1846, however, on her fifth voyage, she ran aground Dundrum Bay, County Down. It was not until August of the following year that she was refloated and towed back to Liverpool, and was, in 1850 sold to Gibbs, Bright & Co. for service to Australia. She was significantly altered at this time. In 1854, she was refitted as a troopship for the Crimean War, and again in 1857 she carried reinforcements to Bombay to deal with the Indian Mutiny. Returning to the Australian run, she carried first touring English cricket side. In 1876, she was put up for sale at Birkenhead, but not bought until 1882. Her new owners, Anthony Gibbs, Sons & Co. converted her entirely to a sailing vessel for transporting coal to San Francisco and returning with wheat. After two such voyages, in 1886 she was dismasted by a hurricane off Cape Horn and she put into the Falkland Islands. As repairs were considered too expensive, she became a hulk for storing coal and wool. On April 14th 1937 she was towed a few miles out of Port Stanley to shallow water in Sparrow Cove; holes were punched in her bottom and she settled on the seabed. The organisation required to co-ordinate the task of recovery came into being in 1968, led by Dr Ewan Corlett. In April 1970 she was refloated, returning to her original dock Bristol in July that year. She is currently undergoing a major conservation programme.

    1839 - 1854, Passenger Vessel
    1854 - 1857, Troop Ship
    1860 - 1876, Passenger Vessel
    1876 - 1886, Cargo Vessel
    1886 - 1927, Hulk
    1927 - 1970, Hulk
    Previous names
    Bibliography
    1971, The SS Great Britain Official Guide, The Macmillan Press Ltd
    Lumsden, Robert J, 1975, Brunel's Three Great Ships, Ships Monthly, December, pp. 22-27
    1975, Ships Preserved: No 6 Brunel's Great Britain, Ships Monthly, June, pp. 34
    Corlett, E C B, 1975, The Stranding of the SS Great Britain in Dundrum Bay, Mariner's Mirror, Vol. 61, pp. 117-126
    Sullivan, Dick, 1978, Old Ships, Boats and Maritime Museums, pp. 11, Coracle Books
    1983, The 'Great Britain'; Progress Report, Sea Breezes, July, pp. 471-473
    Greenhill, Basil and Allington, Peter, 1985, The SS Great Britain as the world's first six-masted schooner, Maritime Wales, Vol. 9, Gwynedd Archive Services
    Blake, Joe, 1989, Restoring the Great Britain, RedCliffe Press Ltd
    Brouwer, Norman J, 1993, International Register of Historic Ships, pp. 152, Edition: 2, Anthony Nelson
    Bruzelius, Lars, 1995, Great Britain, World Wide Web Page, 28th August, Lars_Bruzelius@udac.uu.se
    2001, Matthew joins Great Britian, Classic Boat, Dec
     
  6. As great as it would be to see City of Adelaide restored to her former glory, to the extent that she would be fit for sea service, I think it is unlikely that it would be economically viable.

    To begin with there is the initial restoration. Judging by PTP's photo she's going to need some work on the hull. Then of course there's the rigging which at present is completely non existent. Once that's done you would need to fit her out. Retrofitting of modern safety features, such as water-tight bulkheads, can be even more expensive than fitting them as new. Other big costs would be, the procurement of modern navigation and communication equipment, as well as an engine (to manoeuvre into and out of port) and generators to supply electricity. Once she's seaworthy again you'd need to make sure you could attract enough paying customers to make a profit.

    Many currently active sailing ships are operated as a character building experience for young people, and as such are operated as charities. I sail regularly with such a charity as a volunteer watch leader. Unfortunately the charity I sail with don't seem to be able to secure any regular outside funding. Due to the lack of outside help they have to keep the berth fees quite high, which is a real shame as the voyages are then less accessible to those they could really benefit.

    I guess that until lesbian support groups are no longer needed, and opera houses are willing to pay for their own building work, worthwhile causes such as this will just have to wait. :(