No Final Solution

#1
Why not 'take 'em home?


German corpses await Czech burial

German troops pushed into much of eastern Europe during WWII
The exhumed bodies of thousands of German soldiers killed in World War II have been stored in a Czech Republic factory for three years, reports say.
Some 4,000 sets of remains have been awaiting burial since they were exhumed by a German war graves association, the Czech newspaper MfDnes said.

Plans to establish a permanent cemetery in Prague have run aground because of a lack of funds, the newspaper reported.

The remains include soldiers who fought across eastern Europe during the war.

The remains have been stored in containers in the town of Usti-nad-Labem until the German association draws up final plans for their permanent burial.

'Solution needed'

But funding for new cemeteries in the Czech Republic has run out, MfDnes quoted German officials as saying.

"We are very sorry, but our People's Association for Care for Wartime Graves has run out of money, so I cannot say what will be done with the remains," embassy spokesman Sebastian Gerhardt told Dnes.

The newspaper quoted Fritz Kirchmeier of the graves association, as saying that his organisation would now seek a cheaper site outside central Prague.

"The main thing is to find a proper solution in a spirit of good neighbourliness," another embassy spokesman told the AFP news agency.

Nine cemeteries for German war dead have been established in the Czech Republic since the collapse of communism in 1989, MfDnes said



http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4818434.stm

8O
 
#2
My family is originally Czech & I'm surprised to hear that there are 9 Cemeteries for the German War Dead in CZ. There a significant number of Commonwealth War Graves (mainly POWs and RAF pers) in the Czech Republic, I was surprised to find that all the War Graves had been moved by the Communists (post 45) from where they were originally buried to a central cemetery in Prague.

If anyone is in Prague and is interested in visiting the site, it in NE corner of the cemetery that Franz Kafka is buried in.

Given the bitterness that still exists in CZ, I don't see a quick solution. For a peace loving nation there is little love of Germans, Russians, Jews or Gypsies... well basically anyone who is not Czech or Slovak.

My Grandfather still lives out in the Sticks and from I have seen and heard there is a real need for some form of Truth and Reconciliation work for activities between 1936 - 1949, to purges the ghosts of the past. Sadly that generation is become smaller with time and the old prejudices will remain and be carried forward without some inspired leadership.

Havel did a good job dealing with Communism in general and especially 1967 and the issues in the late 80's but the legacy of WWII is still everywhere and it is likely to poison relations between CZ and Germany for long time to come....
 

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