No. 10 Warning ahead of Iraq vote

Should there be an Inquiry into the war in Iraq

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I agree with a Labour Spokesman saying an inquiry would undermine British troops in the field and se

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
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#1
BBC News Link

Downing Street has warned of "very real consequences" for British troops in Iraq if MPs defeat the government over calls for an inquiry into the war.

No 10 says an inquiry now would be seen by the enemy as a sign of weakness.

But Mr Blair's official spokesman also hinted that the government might agree to an inquiry once troops have left Iraq.

He said: "Of course we continue to learn the lessons all the time and there is no doubt that at the end of our period there people will want to look back.

"The time to deal with that is then, not now. This is not a theoretical debate. It is a very real debate with very real consequences for our soldiers on the ground."


Assuming an inquiry is a good thing (which I think it probably is) there is a logic for it occurring when all the troops are home - since it can then consider the whole event.

There is also a political logic which benefits the gov/Labour Party in having an inquiry when Mr Blair is no longer in office but touring the US. I suspect this thought is actually paramount.

Would there, however, really be adverse consequences on the ground if an inquiry commenced now? Would it mean that the 'enemy' would take time off from indirect fire attacks to catch up on the news about dodgy dossiers and poor kit? Would the various protagonists take succour from the amazing discovery that the whole thing was poorly conceived from start to finish and consider one last push? Would our brave boys be equally amazed and lose heart?

Or is this a particularly shameless smokescreen to protect Mr Blair?
 
#2
Spin to try and head off some accountability by the government. Weakness my arrse - if you think soldiers will be in more danger becasue of an inquiry then we may as well all start smoking wacky backy.....
 
#3
I welcome an inquiry once the last squaddie has left Iraq.

There is a phrase - giving succor to the enemy - and I believe that a premature inquiry would be doing just that
 
#4
What you beleive is rubbish then!! How will this give succor to the enemy exactly?
 
#5
I'm not going to reply to any of Dilfor's points. Not because I disagree with them, but my blood pressure has been a little high of late and I'll start ranting about TCB and pop an artery.

However, I had the pleasure of hearing some Labour Party zoid, may even have been an MP, telling us what the effects will be on the morale of the troops.

"Imagine you were sitting in a foxhole in Iraq etc etc"

Never having done it, I can't imagine what it's like sitting in a foxhole in Iraq and I've been blowing stuff up at weekends for Queen and Country since 1982.

If I can't do it, who the heck (remembering it's current affairs, no swearing .... ) is she to tell us what our soldiers think?
 
#6
Sven said:
I welcome an inquiry once the last squaddie has left Iraq.

There is a phrase - giving succor to the enemy - and I believe that a premature inquiry would be doing just that
By that time it'll be too late to hold Tony to account. I don't see how the British Public understanding why we invaded Iraq and our current engagement in 'Stan would assist the 'enemy'. We're nut deep in it now, how can it get any worse?

Moral will go through the roof on hearing this news. Normal bollox and spin from those Labour Cnuts.
 
#7
I can imagine the moral of troops will plumet knowing TCB is getting investigated for sending them there.

What a complete load of rubbish and so typical to try and spin this off until later trying to cover it with putting troops lives in danger.
 
#8
Aren't there "very real consequences" for British troops in Iraq whether there is an inquiry or not?

I'm sure it will make all the difference to those on the ground to have somebody run through some charade of an enquiry and eventually produce a 236 page report stating the obvious and with no firm recommendations or conclusions.
 
#9
If No 10 is worried about an inquiry being seen as a 'sign of weakness' I wonder how they expect the evacuation of the Basra consulate as reported in today's Daily Mail to be viewed (...if true)?

Accoding to the report, at the advice of Control Risks,'...almost all the 200 Foreign Office and Department for International Development staff will move either to the main UK military HQ outside Basra, to the safety of neighbouring Kuwait, or will be withdrawn back to London'.

On page 2. Presumably in online edition too.
 
#11
Whilst I would normally applaud any effort to kick this awful Government in the crotch, I feel that holding an enquiry now will not be of any great benefit.

Have any other conflicts been the subject of an HMG Inquiry while the bullets are still flying? (Bloody Sunday doesn't count, as that referred to just one major incident not the whole of the troubles) Off hand I can't think of any.

However, a full parliamentary debate on the prosecution of the war in Iraq would I feel be far more useful; so long as it didn't degenerate into "yar-boo" slanging match on party lines...(Some hope there!)
 
#12
Are you surprised he's shirking his responsibilities, he's lied and cheated the whole way through his term in office.

Hopefully the press will pick up on it and ask him what exactly the consequences will be for troops on Ops, other than the huge rise in morale to know that he might actually be brought to book for sending them to the sandpit for no other reason than cheering along dubya.
 
#13
Themanwho said:
Whilst I would normally applaud any effort to kick this awful Government in the crotch, I feel that holding an enquiry now will not be of any great benefit.

Have any other conflicts been the subject of an HMG Inquiry while the bullets are still flying? (Bloody Sunday doesn't count, as that referred to just one major incident not the whole of the troubles) Off hand I can't think of any.

However, a full parliamentary debate on the prosecution of the war in Iraq would I feel be far more useful; so long as it didn't degenerate into "yar-boo" slanging match on party lines...(Some hope there!)
An enquiry into how the conflict has been handled so far might hasten the end to the commitment which is no bad thing.
 
#14
Unless they know what will come out of the inquiry if it is done properly. Not every Iraqi is currently trying to shoot our troops. If a report prove what we all think ie that we declared war on Iraq for their oil then maybe a few more may want to have a pop at our boys.

Could also bring the rest of the Arab world into it aswell, a preemptive strike in case we go for them once we have dried Iraq out.

However if left until Blair has gone then the Government can just blame him, he already knows he is going to get blamed for all of their failings (even though most labour MP's voted for them) so he isn't bothered. He will be sat aboard air force one being protected by the septics.

cynical me? never.

This is pure spin from the government hoping to drag it all out because they know the result of the inquiry, they hope we will either forget or we will be able to blame somebody who is no longer in power.

I for one am getting pretty sick of being treated like an idiot by this government.
 
#15
Ord_Sgt said:
What you beleive is rubbish then!! How will this give succor to the enemy exactly?
Look back in history, read how the Viet Cong were heartened by the squabbling of politicians - thinking that they were coming towards an end game.

On Question Time Paddy Ashdown spoke of the difficulties of withdrawing from a war - if we have to withdraw under fire then it will be much much worse if the enemy had been first enboldened by a premature inquiry
 
#16
looks like a clever bit of "lets just delay this issue till I can handover the gov't to the next mong syndrome"

that man has no conscience or conviction in his actions. i for one am getting fooked off being treated like a mushroom by blair and his little hangers on

more tax's anyone???
 
#17
i think every soldier will be delighted to see the liars get an absolute beating, their morale will be raised no end.
 
#18
If you honestly believe the terrorists in Iraq will receive succour from an inquiry in Iraq, you have a poor grasp of reality. Do you honestly think an inquiry makes it more obvious to them than it is already that many Brits have misgivings about Iraq?
 
#19
Well playing devils advocate here for a minute, lets say that this inquiry actually got to the real truth behind the war in Iraq and the following is proved to be true.

The PM lied to the country about the reasons for the war.
He misued his authority to mobilise the troops.
We are part of an illegal invasion of a soverign nation.
It was done for economic reasons (ie the shrub was twisting our arm)
There is zero good reason for the troops to be there.

If all the above (or something along those lines) were proven to be true then what effect would this have on the troops on the ground?
Any futher action beyond perhaps self defence would be a crime, we would have to pull out asap or be further guilty.

Now if they wait until the troops are no longer there and Tony and his regime are gone then it would make no difference what was uncovered.

*These are just (not so) idle thoughts but I can see real problems if this enquiry goes ahead whilst the guys are still out there.
 
#20
pomps said:
looks like a clever bit of "lets just delay this issue till I can handover the gov't to the next mong syndrome"
Totally agree Pomps - very nicely put. Plus they had inquirys during the 1st (edited from 2nd) WW whilst 'our boys' were still in 'their fox-holes' and we still had a pretty good outcome there, so why should it be different now? Yet again it is just classic Labour and Bliar evasion and slipperiness (situation no change....)

I totally agree with the thread so far that any inquiry would be a bad thing if there was any danger of it denting morale out in Iraq but, hey, let's face it, I don't suppose the women and men out there at the moment feel that there is much back in ol' Blighty that makes them feel wrapped up in with a warm fuzzy feeling that they have a huge amount of support from anyone other than their families anyway... as a nation we are not exactly showing much support are we? Nothing half as much as America, which, like it or love it, certainly knows how to ensure its service personnel are confident they are well regarded and cared about back home (yellow ribbons and old oak trees, bands and banners for homecoming troops and all that).

I think that it is crucial that this inquiry takes place, and takes place soon.

And, rant coming, how Labour can try to spin this issue politically by accusing the Conservatives of 'changing sides' having originally supported the war I just don't know.... I think that:

a) when it became clear that the decision to go to War had been taken it would have been an outrage had the opposition disagreed outright - what kind of a message would that had sent out to the troops?

and

b) now that it is clear that the Conservatives and the nation as a whole were outrageously lied to it is only right to ask searching questions.

OK, rant over..

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