Nimrod's gone

#1
The BBC have said that the RAF have stood down its Nimrod MR2 fleet today this means we have no ASW/SAR assets until the MR 4 comes on line in a couple of years time, another MOD screw up
 
#2
tropper66 said:
The BBC have said that the RAF have stood down its Nimrod MR2 fleet today this means we have no ASW/SAR assets until the MR 4 comes on line in a couple of years time, another MOD screw up
That bloke down the pub said that the new SAS berets are made from an inferior quality of pubic hair. The effect on operational output is massive.

Moral of the story? Don't believe everything you hear/read shit lips.
 
#3
StabTiffy2B said:
tropper66 said:
The BBC have said that the RAF have stood down its Nimrod MR2 fleet today this means we have no ASW/SAR assets until the MR 4 comes on line in a couple of years time, another MOD screw up
That bloke down the pub said that the new SAS berets are made from an inferior quality of pubic hair. The effect on operational output is massive.

Moral of the story? Don't believe everything you hear/read s*** lips.
Actually for once, Trooper's correct. Binning the MR2 has been on the cards for months. A mistake IMO, but this's what happens when the MRA4 are years late and there's no budget left.
 
#4
StabTiffy2B said:
tropper66 said:
The BBC have said that the RAF have stood down its Nimrod MR2 fleet today this means we have no ASW/SAR assets until the MR 4 comes on line in a couple of years time, another MOD screw up
That bloke down the pub said that the new SAS berets are made from an inferior quality of pubic hair. The effect on operational output is massive.

Moral of the story? Don't believe everything you hear/read s*** lips.
Well according to the MOD and BBC they stand down today leaving us with 2 flying Nimrods XJ514/515 which are the only MR4s flying and not due into service untill 2012
 
#5
Nimrod withdrawal 'puts lives at risk'
BBC News 25 Mar 2010 said:
A senior RAF officer has told BBC Scotland he fears lives will be put "at risk" by the MOD's decision to withdraw Nimrods from operations.

The RAF will bid farewell to the aircraft at the Kinloss base in Moray on Friday when personnel and families will commemorate the role of the MR2.

It is due to be replaced operationally by the MRA4 in the autumn of 2012.

The MoD said the Nimrod's work would be carried out "by a variety of different aircraft" in the interim...
 
F

fozzy

Guest
#6
Dunservin said:
Nimrod withdrawal 'puts lives at risk'
BBC News 25 Mar 2010 said:
A senior RAF officer has told BBC Scotland he fears lives will be put "at risk" by the MOD's decision to withdraw Nimrods from operations.

The RAF will bid farewell to the aircraft at the Kinloss base in Moray on Friday when personnel and families will commemorate the role of the MR2.

It is due to be replaced operationally by the MRA4 in the autumn of 2012.

The MoD said the Nimrod's work would be carried out "by a variety of different aircraft" in the interim...
Not to mention the efficacy of a submarine based deterent.

Utter madness.
 
#7
Dunservin said:
Nimrod withdrawal 'puts lives at risk'
BBC News 25 Mar 2010 said:
A senior RAF officer has told BBC Scotland he fears lives will be put "at risk" by the MOD's decision to withdraw Nimrods from operations.

The RAF will bid farewell to the aircraft at the Kinloss base in Moray on Friday when personnel and families will commemorate the role of the MR2.

It is due to be replaced operationally by the MRA4 in the autumn of 2012.

The MoD said the Nimrod's work would be carried out "by a variety of different aircraft" in the interim...
Putting more presure on the Herc fleet, really good bit of planing that
 
#8
StabTiffy2B said:
tropper66 said:
The BBC have said that the RAF have stood down its Nimrod MR2 fleet today this means we have no ASW/SAR assets until the MR 4 comes on line in a couple of years time, another MOD screw up
That bloke down the pub said that the new SAS berets are made from an inferior quality of pubic hair. The effect on operational output is massive.

Moral of the story? Don't believe everything you hear/read s*** lips.
Do try and keep up:

http://www.pprune.org/military-aircrew/399125-nimrod-go-march.html

"The RAF’s fleet of 11 Nimrod surveillance aircraft, one of which catastrophically burst into flames, killing 14 servicemen in Afghanistan in 2006, is to be withdrawn from service by March as part of a range of defence cuts announced yesterday. Bob Ainsworth, the Defence Secretary, denied that the decision to axe the Nimrod Mark 2s a year earlier than planned had anything to do with the crash of Nimrod XV230,"


The Times December 16, 2009

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article6957920.ece
 
#9
This is the first time we've been without a dedicated fixed wing MR capability since the Great War, and are now (in all likelihood) the only 'major' military power without such. Another great innovation from your favourite island nation.
 
#10
BuckFelize said:
This is the first time we've been without a dedicated fixed wing MR capability since the Great War, and are now (in all likelihood) the only 'major' military power without such. Another great innovation from your favourite island nation.
No Carrier based Air defence fighter either......

This Government really is beneath contempt
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
Thought I'd jump in say "Yeah StabTiffy2B, who's the sh!tlips now, eh? Howd'ya like them apples huh!?" Yeeeaaahhhh!

I thought we really needed this particular asset to continue flying because it had very similar ground movement-tracking capabilities to the Apache, thus exceptionally useful for following insurgents about and watching attacks on FOBs unfolding; or do we now have sufficient quantities of Apaches and UCAVS to negate that need?
 
#13
pardon my ignorance but is there really any role for nimrod now anyway?

ok so they do maritime patrol, for what threat? and do we not have a navy to protect our waters?

and regarding SAR theres sea kings for that, and surely foreign airforces can assist with nimrods role regarding SAR, both the norwegians and dutch have orions for maritime patrol
 
#14
skidmarx said:
Good, always hated Elgar.
I always thought he was one of the sons of Noah
 
#15
I remember in the late 90s being told that overstretch in the British forces does not exist. The source was in a position to know.
I suppose it's true, that which does not exist, in this case the Nimrod force, cannot be overstretched. Sorted.
 
#16
tank6275 said:
pardon my ignorance but is there really any role for nimrod now anyway?

ok so they do maritime patrol, for what threat? and do we not have a navy to protect our waters?

and regarding SAR theres sea kings for that, and surely foreign airforces can assist with nimrods role regarding SAR, both the norwegians and dutch have orions for maritime patrol
Pardon my ignorance too, but reliance on Norway and the Nederlands may be fine in theory - but in practice?

We have virtually no Royal Navy now - another 'blinder' by this quasi-Marxist gang of lunatics running our asylum.

Russia has a large programme of submarine building and renovation.

We live on an island surrounded by wet soggy stuff called the sea.

Just a few random and probably ignorant thoughts.

Finally, 'tropper66' may not be the Editor in Chief of the Oxford English Dictionary, but he is normally correct on aviation matters. Additionally, he possesses a perfectly judged opinion of the monocular oaf currently masquerading as Her Majesty's First Minister. :D
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
Tank, as a pongo you wouldn't know this,although the aircraft involved have always been operated by the RAF, Long Range Maritime Patrol has always been an integral part of naval anti-submarine warfare. The Nimrod in particular was important because, being a jet, it could get out to its patrol area more rapidly than its predecessor the Shackleton or, indeed, its so-called replacement the Herc. I await with interest any insights into what sensors the Hercs tasked with this possess and how these compare with the Nimrod fit. There's a LOT more to it than just stooging around with a pair of binoculars.
 
#18
Biped said:
I thought we really needed this particular asset to continue flying because it had very similar ground movement-tracking capabilities to the Apache, thus exceptionally useful for following insurgents about and watching attacks on FOBs unfolding; or do we now have sufficient quantities of Apaches and UCAVS to negate that need?
Isn't that what SENTINEL R1 is for?
 
#19
tank6275 said:
pardon my ignorance but is there really any role for nimrod now anyway?

ok so they do maritime patrol, for what threat? and do we not have a navy to protect our waters?

and regarding SAR theres sea kings for that, and surely foreign airforces can assist with nimrods role regarding SAR, both the norwegians and dutch have orions for maritime patrol
You got it right in the first sentence, ignorance.

As some one who wore a dark blue uniform for a few years I am not the greatest lover of the Crabs, but if you want to search a large area of ocean for thing either on the surface or below it the Nimrod was essential. As to threat, one wonders why the Russians are probing into our air defences now on a regular basis, and how much they are doing the same underwater.

As for SAR, first the endurance of the Nimrod far exceeded that of the Seaking, and they had extensive command and control capability, essential in a major SAR action. On the basis of your comments on depending on the Norwegian or Dutch Orions, we could save even more if we shut doern the Army and asked the French to cover that for us.

Anyway the Dutch and Norwegians have their own areas of responsibility and are neither funded or equipped to cover for us.
 
#20
seaweed said:
Tank, as a pongo you wouldn't know this,although the aircraft involved have always been operated by the RAF, Long Range Maritime Patrol has always been an integral part of naval anti-submarine warfare. The Nimrod in particular was important because, being a jet, it could get out to its patrol area more rapidly than its predecessor the Shackleton or, indeed, its so-called replacement the Herc. I await with interest any insights into what sensors the Hercs tasked with this possess and how these compare with the Nimrod fit. There's a LOT more to it than just stooging around with a pair of binoculars.
Not any more theres not!!! :D
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
O Sappers 2
3 Int Corps 4
F Aviation 8

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top