Nig

#1
Once got asked by a Nig, what Nig meant, did`nt have a clue, anyway ex 1 RTR back in the 70s, we had lots of Tank Regiments back then, and Tanks to spare, as much as you guys are doing a great job, you are not getting the backing and support of your leaders, and them twats in Whitehall, say no more!!!! there were Four RTR Regts when I joined and in the years since I have seen some of the good old Regiments completely disappear, and RTR whittled down to just one, I know the same can be said of Infantry and other units, but this latest announcement just sticks in my throat, right, off me soapbox, bring on the lunacy, its them Infantry types I can`t stand, Take cover!!!!!!!!!!
 
#2
New in Green.

Close the door on your way out.
 
#3
Thanks for that, he came out with an equally plausible answer by the way, "New in Garrison", but your never to old to learn, Old dog new tricks and all that Cheers
 
#4
New Intake Group
New In Germany

Or is that not what you're asking?

But WTF has it got to do with the piss-up forum?

Oh and welcome to Arrse. You woolyback grunt.
Eeee, I bet Sinner has nicked him at some stage.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
The Vietnam term was FNG, which, because the Nam was cool and we lifted slang from it, got abbreviated to NG, which, by some miraculous process, became Nig in the British Army. You could also drop poontang into the conversation if you're feeling hip but you need to be at least 6'2" and naturally rhythmic to carry that off.
 
#8
#9
Now thats the spirit, Grunt is it, why I`ve never been so insulted in my life, but am betting its about to start, its nice to be back in the Naafi
 
#10
The Vietnam term was FNG, which, because the Nam was cool and we lifted slang from it, got abbreviated to NG, which, by some miraculous process, became Nig in the British Army. You could also drop poontang into the conversation if you're feeling hip but you need to be at least 6'2" and naturally rhythmic to carry that off.
Feeling Hip gave me the second laugh of the day.
 
#13
#14
The Vietnam term was FNG, which, because the Nam was cool and we lifted slang from it, got abbreviated to NG, which, by some miraculous process, became Nig in the British Army. You could also drop poontang into the conversation if you're feeling hip but you need to be at least 6'2" and naturally rhythmic to carry that off.
And black
 
#15
NIG was in use when I joined in 1959 so the Vietnam link is bollocks. Back in the day it was short for Nig-Nog, someone who knew nothing in otherwise a new recruit.
 
#16
The Vietnam term was FNG, which, because the Nam was cool and we lifted slang from it, got abbreviated to NG, which, by some miraculous process, became Nig in the British Army. You could also drop poontang into the conversation if you're feeling hip but you need to be at least 6'2" and naturally rhythmic to carry that off.
You've been watching too much full metal jacket!
I was a NIG in 1965
yanks always favoured "rookies"
 
#17
'Crow' was the expression in the Guards. I have no idea why
 
#18
Nig was in common use in early sixties before I knew Viet Nam was in China,always thought it was applied to newcomer,regardless of military skills or lack of them.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
NIG was in use when I joined in 1959 so the Vietnam link is bollocks. Back in the day it was short for Nig-Nog, someone who knew nothing in otherwise a new recruit.
Any references? I've never come across the term NIG (or Nig-Nog - if someone called you that, by the way, they were making an entirely different point) used in any Korean, Malayan or Emergency memoires/histories, nor has it ever been mentioned by anyone who served in those conflicts who I've talked to. It doesn't appear anywhere in any World War Two memoire I've seen either, and I've read everything from GMF and Milligan to Rifleman Bowlby. Happy to be proved wrong.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
You've been watching too much full metal jacket!
I was a NIG in 1965
yanks always favoured "rookies"
Look in at the back of Al Santoli's two books: FNG = ******* New Guy (and 1965 is certainly time enough to import from Vietnam - and, no offence meant but, f@ck me you're old).

Etymology is not an exact science - my point is that Vietnam seems to be the point that the term reaches the literary record. The term could easily have been current in the US military before Vietnam and absorbed into the NATO lingua franca by 1960 ish, given that no-one bothered much with recording their hell serving in the Federal Republic.
 
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