Nick Carter proposes Robot Soldiers

... Meaning that the drone would effectively know the difference between a Foxhound, or Mastiff, and the other sides GAZ. Along with, depending on imaging quality discriminate between the helmet, weapon and personal equipment of our sides infantry and the other sides.
Can we encourage the Americans to use that on their manned aircraft... And just check it doesn't do "Not American=target".
 
Marks and Spencers used to Model 204 for predicting footfall and store layout in the late 80s, it was relational and had early "pattern" recog. It was creaky old tech even back then.

RDBMS were not as efficient as using AI.

With an RDBMS the operator writes a query they are asking a question and only receives an answer to that single question. It is down to the imagination of the initial operator as to how informative the system ends up being. Most just set up a string of queries and then have the reports generated, daily, weekly, or monthly.

Using AI could throw out all sorts of previously unknown patterns that you would have no clue as to what the fcuk they meant until you sat down and analysed them. My premise of data mining a data warehouse was to have surprises pop up so that people would literally say, "I didn't know that", and then use the information for competitive advantage.

I have not done anything in the field for over 20 years. I do chat and meet people who are still active in the field and it is interesting to hear what advances have been made and how much stuff has advanced. Shopping centres with facial recognition, gait analysis, the ability to lock onto customers and track their route through the shopping centre. To the extent that AI based visual image analysis can identify suspect behaviour in potential thieves, and S vest wearers.
 
Can we encourage the Americans to use that on their manned aircraft... And just check it doesn't do "Not American=target".

The problem is always piss poor programming along with lack of rigorous testing. I have seen loads of systems over the years where it immediately jumps out that the programming was badly done and then tested by the programmer who knows all his weakpoints so tests around them.

The best testing is done by giving a BFO crate of assorted fizzy drinks, and a pile of pizzas, along with the software to the nerdiest first year software engineering students you can find.

I was chatting to a fellow motorcyclist who lives up the road from me a couple of weeks ago - he works for an IT security firm. He offered my lad a part-time job as a white hat hacker as and when they do system security testing. They usually put up $1million over a couple of days and depending on whether, or not the kids get in to the system, and how far they get in, determines on how much they get.
 
This might be a movie, but the technology for this is all out there. People seem to be under the impression that drone-tech has only been around recently. Wrong. I was looking at research done at MIT and JPL around 25 years ago. The prime object of the research was to supply Govt agencies with the means to track, or hunt, man, or vehicle shaped objects. Even back then the better ones were using AI pattern recognition (face and shape) algorithms to differentiate between targets. I was doing my AI stuff back then at uni which is how I bumped into their research. I know that the algorithms have improved over the last 25 years, processor speeds have increased, and we all know video technology for image capture has definately improved. And, back then they were already working with drones that would comfortably sit on the flat of your hand - that sizing can also be squished down now with the advancements in battery and brushless motor tech.


This was from 2018.

 
This was from 2018.



Yup, the tech is out there, just a case of someone putting it together, if they have not already.

I reckon 6 months, a dozen post-grads, plus a couple of retired ammo techs, with a few million in the kitty, and you could have widgets like these out and about. Meanwhile someone from a defence research agency will read this and choke on their coffee because they have spent tens of millions and taken 5 years to get nowhere. All I can say is, "change your employee recruitment model because you never get the best, you don't pay enough".
 

HCL

LE
RDBMS were not as efficient as using AI.

With an RDBMS the operator writes a query they are asking a question and only receives an answer to that single question. It is down to the imagination of the initial operator as to how informative the system ends up being. Most just set up a string of queries and then have the reports generated, daily, weekly, or monthly.

Using AI could throw out all sorts of previously unknown patterns that you would have no clue as to what the fcuk they meant until you sat down and analysed them. My premise of data mining a data warehouse was to have surprises pop up so that people would literally say, "I didn't know that", and then use the information for competitive advantage.

I have not done anything in the field for over 20 years. I do chat and meet people who are still active in the field and it is interesting to hear what advances have been made and how much stuff has advanced. Shopping centres with facial recognition, gait analysis, the ability to lock onto customers and track their route through the shopping centre. To the extent that AI based visual image analysis can identify suspect behaviour in potential thieves, and S vest wearers.

Oh I know. Like comparing a horse and carriage with a Bugatti. Totally different world now but it was fascinating in the 80s. I wonder what it was like when the CIA used it and if they ever caught anyone?
 
Oh I know. Like comparing a horse and carriage with a Bugatti. Totally different world now but it was fascinating in the 80s. I wonder what it was like when the CIA used it and if they ever caught anyone?

I attended the first couple of data mining conferences in the UK and through those met a couple of blokes from the BT tech shed. The stuff they let me see that they were using for fraud prevention was pretty damn nifty, and worked damn well for the purposes they were using it for, which was not only fraud prevention.
 
Last edited:
Robot soldiers... what could possibly go wrong?
 
Robot soldiers... what could possibly go wrong?
1622546387526.png
 
This could have been quite funny if the robot lost its rag and shot the demonstrator



I dont thinks it real though :)
 
It seems things are stepping up a grade and there are concerns (and rightly so) about AI being left to run the battlefield:

U.N. talks adjourn without deal to regulate 'killer robots'​


Countries taking part in U.N. talks on autonomous weapons stopped short of launching negotiations on an international treaty to govern their use, instead agreeing merely to continue discussions.

The International Committee of the Red Cross and several NGOs had been pushing for negotiators to begin work on an international treaty that would establish legally-binding new rules on the machine-operated weapons.
 

The Three Laws of Robotics (Isaac Asimov, 1942)​

1.A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.
Isaac Asimov and the Three Laws of Robotics
 

Latest Threads

Top