Nice Collection With Provenance

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#2
Caught this in the Express, what caught my eye was the numeric comparison to the VC:GM awarded in The Great War.

From Discover on Google Antiques Roadshow: 'Rare' World War I medal's massive valuation stuns expert

The gentleman in question had quite an interesting service history.
Thanks for sharing; interesting story although the reporting leaves something to be desired. It reads as though the Express journalist was trying (and failing) to take it down verbatim from the television - unless the valuer did actually say "1914-15 star British war medal" all as one thing. The valuation just goes to show you that scarcity makes a difference (although it's interesting to speculate how the Queen's South Africa Medal and the Khedive's Sudan Medal also affected the value, not to mention the Medaille Militaire). That's rather higher than I would expect a (more commonly-awarded) WW1 Distinguished Conduct Medal group to be valued at, probably several times as much. Also interesting that more CGMs were awarded in WW2 than WW1 (191 vs 110). It would be interesting to know if that was a factor of size of Navy.
 
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#3
Thanks for sharing; interesting story although the reporting leaves something to be desired. It reads as though the Express journalist was trying (and failing) to take it down verbatim from the television - unless the value did actually say "1914-15 star British war medal" all as one thing. The valuation just goes to show you that scarcity makes a difference (although it's interesting to speculate how the Queen's South Africa Medal and the Khedive's Sudan Medal also affected the value, not to mention the Medaille Militaire). That's rather higher than I would expect a WW1 Distinguished Conduct Medal group to be valued at, probably several times as much. Also interesting that more CGMs were awarded in WW2 than WW1 (191 vs 110). It would be interesting to know if that was a factor of size of Navy.
Thanks complete agreement regards the poor reporting, curious if the chap was part of Churchill's Naval. Brigade?
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#4
Thanks complete agreement regards the poor reporting, curious if the chap was part of Churchill's Naval. Brigade?
It's certainly possible. This from Wikipedia:

"Eleven troopships and Canopus, Dartmouth and Doris, two destroyers and trawlers rendezvoused off Bulair before dawn and the warships began a day-long bombardment, just after daybreak. A destroyer made a close pass off the beach and later on, ships' boats were swung out from the troopships and lines of eight cutters pulled by a trawler made as if to land. In the late afternoon men began to embark on the boats, which headed for the shore just before dark and returned after night fell. During the night Lieutenant-Commander Bernard Freyberg swam ashore and lit flares along the beach, crept inland and observed the Ottoman defences. Freyberg found that the defences were dummies and returned safely to report. Just after dawn, the decoy force sailed south to join the main landings, coming ashore on 30 April."

Interesting to think that he may have been at the helm of one of those eight cutters!
 
#6
Interesting, thank you. This though, 'kin 'ell:

“He was at the helm of landing craft in Gallipoli in Anzac and he was shot in the mouth with a bullet. And all his teeth were shot out. He went down below and he washed his mouth out and then insisted on returning to the helm where he stayed for the next two days.”
 

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