News story: WO1 Glenn Haughton OBE has been appointed as the first Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chiefs of Staff Committee (SEAC)

During that time period in Depot Para the recruits still had to take their own KFS; they would march across Balloon Square to the cookhouse with their left hand behind their backs clutching their green mug with their KFS inside it!

The food in Depot Para was always pretty good because they were allowed to claim arduous duty supplement full-time, same as the three battalions but regardless of that the crows were still amazed at the standard of food at Brize, especially after 3 weeks on Advanced Wales!!
As was the case at Depot Queens Div.
 

Hohenidoom

Old-Salt
We're on an ex RAF base (with a gigantic mess for very few livers-in). It's old now, but seems remarkably forward thinking and adaptable for something that is now approaching 100 years young. With a bit of cash and some lurvé, it could be a cracking place and something that'd be very usable for another hundred years, and useful for the Army.

Yes, before you ask, the Army definitely have managed to trash the place. I'll not tire of looking over the mature lawns with my coffee in the morning, though.
 
We're on an ex RAF base (with a gigantic mess for very few livers-in). It's old now, but seems remarkably forward thinking and adaptable for something that is now approaching 100 years young. With a bit of cash and some lurvé, it could be a cracking place and something that'd be very usable for another hundred years, and useful for the Army.

Yes, before you ask, the Army definitely have managed to trash the place. I'll not tire of looking over the mature lawns with my coffee in the morning, though.
Giant mess = high attrition rate of aircrew.
 
Wasn't Donna Nook a peach of a station? Cowden had a lovely combined mess - reminded me of a nice Clubhouse on a golf course. A great DOE/PSA design.
Donna was brill, mate was stationed there and we visited a few times whilst in further training.
What was so special about this RAF Donna Nook, bombing range?
Small, everyone knew each other and v little bullshit. Experiences may vary....dunno if I'd have enjoyed it as much if I'd done a full tour there.
 
I think the Army has had plenty of time to have upgraded accommodation over the last 75 years...but it's not an infrastructure problem - it's a cultural issue. Again, if it wasn't for the Deepcut tragedies, I fear the Army would have done very little to remedy the situation.

I have a recruiting book entitled 'His Majesty's Army' published in the late 1930s which excitedly mentions that some new Barracks 'now have hot water'. That was standard on established RAF stations since the early 1920s - a fact pointed out by TE Lawrence in his account of going through recruit training at RAF Uxbridge in 1919/20
You must have missed the 40,000+ Scale Z rooms built for the Army by the PFIs, PPPs, Army Basing Plan, Catterick Development Plan and SLAM over the last 25 years.

Or maybe you missed that the “cookhouse” was called the ORs Restaurant in the 1980s and that the term “cookhouse” is just an old, dated anachronistic military slang.

Or perhaps you missed that the RAF’s much vaunted accommodation was often crap too. Pre-SLAM, Brize had airmen living in near derelict on-station quarters, in old 4-man blocks that were divided with plywood walls into single man rabbit hutches and it routinely put airmen up in Gateway because it’s accomodation was falling apart. I doubt it ever had a single winter when it kept every block heated; they were all originally on district heating with pipes and calorifiers that were failing. Or they had internal distribution pipe work that was shagged.
 
What yardstick are you using? Better than what?
Differently, is the word you're(He's) looking for.

I used to work in a joint unit that was Army, RAF and CS. Our boss, a full colonel, reckoned that we all had different approaches to things. If he told us to go and get to the top of that there hill. the army guys would run to their lockers, grab their bergans and practically run up it causing damage and chaos, overcoming difficulties as they were encountered. The RAF would set up a project team, arrange a photo-recce flyover, develop a project plan with risk register and TOR's, then make their way up the hill, tidying as they went, arriving in good form two days later than the army who by now were starving as they'd forgotten to bring food. The CS would step outside the building, look up at said hill and say, "Sorry Colonel, that's not in our job description and we'll have to speak to the union."
 
It's not snobbery; most RAF personnel are simply aghast at the way the Army has treated its personnel over the years. On another thread I reported on how the Army-led J1 on my last serving unit grossly mishandled my medical discharge over two years ago; it wasn't until I was assigned to an RAF unit for de-kitting that my complex case history and medical treatment was properly managed. And this was, by no means, an isolated case.
Really? Aghast? I'll tell you about aghast. In one of my jobs I had a bunch of RAF working for me. RAF Plod and dog stranglers, a chef and a driver. The RAFP consisted of a sgt, a substantive cpl and about 10 or so acting cpls, which was the normal set up. One of the acting cpls went over to Wildenrath to do some admin and asked about his re-engagement(?) papers. Apparently, they have to re-enlist at the end of each engagement rather than just remain by default unless they choose to leave. The clerk checked his file and told him there were none. In this split second, this young fella became aware that his services were no longer required and he had better start making his plans for the future. There had been no interview, no warning letter, no indication at all. Just, no re-engagement papers in his file.

That is what I call appalling and we army guys were definitely aghast at that, even though all the RAF guys assured us it was perfectly normal.
 
Has this thread been knobbled by the once and future SEAC? We seem to have chosen to ignore the senior soldier's alleged contempt for the values and standards he's supposed to propagate and uphold, and instead dedicated days to arguing about who had the best cookhouse in the 1980s.
 
We're on an ex RAF base (with a gigantic mess for very few livers-in). It's old now, but seems remarkably forward thinking and adaptable for something that is now approaching 100 years young. With a bit of cash and some lurvé, it could be a cracking place and something that'd be very usable for another hundred years, and useful for the Army.

Yes, before you ask, the Army definitely have managed to trash the place. I'll not tire of looking over the mature lawns with my coffee in the morning, though.
Someone, I can't remember who although I think it was at Brawdy, once suggested to me that RAF stations were better fitted out than army camps because for the RAF they were where they lived, where they trained and from where they operated, but army camps were just where they stayed in between exercises and operations.
 
Has this thread been knobbled by the once and future SEAC? We seem to have chosen to ignore the senior soldier's alleged contempt for the values and standards he's supposed to propagate and uphold, and instead dedicated days to arguing about who had the best cookhouse in the 1980s.

I think it's just people passing the time until more information becomes available. The consensus being he is a knob of the first order and should resign. Failing that he should be punted very publicly.
 
Has this thread been knobbled by the once and future SEAC? We seem to have chosen to ignore the senior soldier's alleged contempt for the values and standards he's supposed to propagate and uphold, and instead dedicated days to arguing about who had the best cookhouse in the 1980s.
If only we had a SEAC back in the eighties - he could have sorted this out. #equalcookhousesforall.
 

Ex_crab

Old-Salt
Someone, I can't remember who although I think it was at Brawdy, once suggested to me that RAF stations were better fitted out than army camps because for the RAF they were where they lived, where they trained and from where they operated, but army camps were just where they stayed in between exercises and operations.

Also, RAF camps are , through necessity, more "out in the sticks" than Army camps, so a bit more comfort, better food and more facilities are needed.
 
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