News story: UK hosts largest European military graduation parade

#1
Ministry of Defence said:
Some 700 Junior Soldiers from Cambria, Peninsula and Burma companies marched onto the parade ground at Uniacke Barracks in front of over 6,000 relatives and friends.
Major General Tim Radford inspected the students from all over the UK and took the salute when they graduated from the college, watched by the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Oz Lane, and members of his staff. The AFC’s 3 companies marched onto the parade square led by the Heavy Cavalry and Cambrai Band.
Following the inspection and salute, prizes were awarded to the best students.

A company commander forms up the parade [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]AFC Harrogate now takes in Junior Soldiers on 2 types of course: a short 22-week course, and a longer 42-week course. The new short course delivers basic training to the Junior Soldiers before they leave to start their longer and more specialist technical training. They also have the opportunity to gain National Vocational Qualifications in English, Maths and Information and Communications Technology, as well as driver theory training.
The longer course consists of a unique combination of military skills and vocational qualifications before the Junior Soldiers move on to phase 2 training in their chosen trade or specialism. They have the opportunity to achieve a City and Guilds apprenticeship for Information Technology users at level 2, incorporating functional skills. Many have also achieved a Duke of Edinburgh Award.
The graduation parade marks the culmination of 12 months of hard work for the young men and women of Cambrai, Peninsula and Burma Companies,” said Lieutenant Colonel Lane.
After a well-earned summer break, our Junior Soldiers can look forward to their specialist training before embarking on the busy, rewarding careers that lie ahead of them.

Military musicians of the Heavy Cavalry and Cambrai Band march onto the parade square [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]Junior Soldiers work on their leadership and team skills as part of the college’s personal and team development package. They undertake a number of adventurous training activities, as well as physical and mental challenges, culminating in a 30-hour challenge patrol across the Yorkshire Dales. The students are also given the opportunity to sample a wide variety of sports promoting fitness and agility.
Many have just returned from their final exercise in Garelochhead, Scotland. The arduous exercise is the culmination of their fieldcraft and military skills training.

Junior Soldier Katy Morrey with the Gilbert Award; presented to the most improved Junior Soldier in each intake [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]Junior Soldier Katy Morrey is destined for a career in the Royal Artillery and won the prize for the most improved Junior Soldier in her intake. She said:
My advice to others considering this as a career would be to stick it out. It can be hard but it is worth it in the end.
It is not like school. You feel like you are getting a lot out of it and you come away at the end of the day feeling you have actually achieved something.
This college grows you as a person. Before I came here I couldn’t stand in front of people and talk – I was too nervous. And now I feel a lot more confident in myself.

Major General Tim Radford inspects the Junior Soldiers [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]The Army Foundation College in Harrogate opened in 1998 and provides training for soldiers destined for all the Army’s many career paths. It now provides training for 1,344 Junior Soldiers, taking in students twice a year, in September and March.

Crowds of families and friends show their support from the sides of the parade square [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

In time and in line: a polished performance from the graduating Junior Soldiers [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

Junior Soldiers present arms [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

Junior Soldiers graduation parade at the Army Foundation College in Harrogate [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

Junior Soldiers graduation parade at the Army Foundation College in Harrogate [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

Junior Soldiers graduation parade at the Army Foundation College in Harrogate [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]

Junior Soldiers graduation parade at the Army Foundation College in Harrogate [Picture: Corporal Gabriel Moreno, Crown copyright]


More...
 
#2
Bottom photo, the signals WO1 has a twisted lanyard, scandalous; I expect better from my old corps. Jacket sleeves creased & a pissed belt. If I'd gone on parade like that when I was in Phase 1 - I'd still be in jail.............

For shame sir, for shame.
 
#3
Bottom photo, the signals WO1 has a twisted lanyard, scandalous; I expect better from my old corps. Jacket sleeves creased & a pissed belt. If I'd gone on parade like that when I was in Phase 1 - I'd still be in jail.............

For shame sir, for shame.
I'm surprised that you didn't say that there's shit on the end of his stick...
 
#4
They'll finish their training just in time to:

a. Find that their intended Regt or Corps has been disbanded or amalgamated.
b. Receive their redundancy notices.
c. Set off on another foreign adventure in Syria/Egypt/some other shitty part of the 3rd World* where British politicians want to big themselves up.

Cynical....moi?

Rodney2q

*delete as applicable
 
#5
...and there's an example of where the Army could make savings at no cost. Scrap FAD and its equivalents. All it takes is a directive that allows medals to be worn on PCS. Saves manufacture, transport, tailoring, storage, replacement, cleaning...

Well done to the kids, though.
 
#6
What's with the comedy parade 'Stache? :? Well done to the lads and lasses however. :-D

Comedy Parade Stache.jpg
 
#9
...and there's an example of where the Army could make savings at no cost. Scrap FAD and its equivalents. All it takes is a directive that allows medals to be worn on PCS. Saves manufacture, transport, tailoring, storage, replacement, cleaning...

Well done to the kids, though.
Not sure about scrapping No 2 Dress completely, it's always good to have some sort of smart dress.

What I don't understand is where the need for FAD came from. In all the years prior to the introduction of FAD, not once did I hear anyone - ever - say "Look at my No 2 Dress. I wish it was a slightly lighter shade of khaki, had different cuffs and was made out of a slightly wanker material!"

The whole saga is reminiscent of the "Red Dwarf" Ocean Grey/Battleship Grey scene:

Lister: Why are they painting it the same colour it was before?
Rimmer: They're changing it from Ocean Grey to Military Grey. Something that should've been done a long time ago.
Lister: Looks exactly the same to me.
Rimmer: No. No, no, no. (pointing at one section of the wall) That's the new Military Grey bit there, and that's the dowdy, old, nasty Ocean Grey bit there. (The two parts are indistinguishable) Or is it the other way around?
A pointless change foisted on the Army for no real reason. It seems like some Senior Officer somewhere looked jealously at the rollout of PCS, and wished he could make a name for himself by doing the same for parade dress.

Unfortunately, it's made us look like a crappy brown version of the RAF.

Still, very well done the kids passing out today.
 
#10
...and there's an example of where the Army could make savings at no cost. Scrap FAD and its equivalents. All it takes is a directive that allows medals to be worn on PCS. Saves manufacture, transport, tailoring, storage, replacement, cleaning...

Well done to the kids, though.
Yes, making the entire Army look like a total bag of shit like the TA do on most formal events is definitely worth the fairly tiny cost of FAD.
 
#11
Not sure about scrapping No 2 Dress completely, it's always good to have some sort of smart dress.
It's still a lot of money out of the public purse for a uniform that's rarely worn outside a barracks and even then by only a few. Discounting events where it has to be worn to allow medals to be paraded, that only leaves Wimbledon, doesn't it? Hardly a justification for equipping the entire Army with the stuff.
 
#12
Yes, making the entire Army look like a total bag of shit like the TA do on most formal events is definitely worth the fairly tiny cost of FAD.
By your reasoning, the entire Army looks a total bag of shit except on the rare occasions when FAD is worn?
 
#13
By your reasoning, the entire Army looks a total bag of shit except on the rare occasions when FAD is worn?
They do. It just doesn't matter when you're sleeping off a hangover in the back of a 43 or sweeping a World War 2 bomber hangar yet again. When you're marching through the local town centre on Remembrance Day it does matter and the TA look like a complete bag of shite in combats and medals on 'formal' parades.
 
#14
It's still a lot of money out of the public purse for a uniform that's rarely worn outside a barracks and even then by only a few. Discounting events where it has to be worn to allow medals to be paraded, that only leaves Wimbledon, doesn't it? Hardly a justification for equipping the entire Army with the stuff.
I can't say I agree. Having been unfortunate enough to partake in a military funeral of a soldier, the sight of the deceased's friends resplendent in uniform, unashamedly military and proud (as he was) was enough of a justification for me. It just would not have been the same in PCS.

There are other occasions too, I am sure.

We're the military, we sometimes do things that seem odd to outsiders. But it's all for a good reason.

If only there was a financial value on "pride", that would make this argument much easier :)
 
#15
FAD - the clue is in the acronym. There was nothing wrong with the old 2s whatsoever until someone had an idea. Every army should have a dress uniform of some sort - otherwise we'd look like the Hutu Militia (but without the wellies and lifejackets).
 
#16
This may sound like a bone question, but why do you need 2 parade dresses? Surly 1 should be enough? I mean why have all these fancy uniforms and have fad too?
 

Bowmore_Assassin

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#17
Give them 5 years and that's where they'll be anyway.
No, they won't if current recruiting into the TA of ex-Regulars is anything to go by.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
#18
No, they won't if current recruiting into the TA of ex-Regulars is anything to go by.
Given that this was "the largest military graduation parade" at a time when the Regular Army is busy reducing its numbers, you've got to wonder where they're all going to and for how long. Fast track TA recruit and trade training by stealth?
 
#19
It's still a lot of money out of the public purse for a uniform that's rarely worn outside a barracks and even then by only a few. Discounting events where it has to be worn to allow medals to be paraded, that only leaves Wimbledon, doesn't it?
Since when is what we wear outside barracks the be-all and end-all? We wear it inside barracks, on remembrance day, at funerals, medal parades, regtl photos and a host of other times. And looking like the military arm of a banana republic (like the TA do) on parade would only serve to denigrate those events where we wear 2s/FAD.

And 2s/FAD isn't worn at Wimbledon - that would be barrack dress

PS if you really want some then grow some balls and join the Army :)
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads