News story: UK’s first A400M aircraft named “City of Bristol”

#1
The UK’s first A400M Atlas has been named “City of Bristol” by the Royal Air Force in a rare honour to highlight the important role industry in the city has played in the delivery of the aircraft.

The wings of the next-generation military transporter plane were designed and manufactured at the Airbus factory in Filton, Bristol, with a number of other businesses in the city, including Rolls-Royce, GKN Aerospace, and Atkins, demonstrating a range of high quality aerospace skills which support the A400M programme.

A total of 22 A400M Atlas aircraft have been ordered by the Ministry of Defence’s procurement arm, Defence, Equipment and Support (DE&S), which is also based in the city at Abbey Wood.


A400M Altas 'City of Bristol' facts and figures

The naming of the aircraft is a special privilege for Bristol, since it is unusual for the RAF to name an individual aircraft in this way.

Speaking at a ceremony at the Airbus site to mark the event, Defence Minister Philip Dunne said:


The A400M programme has created or secured work for around 900 people at companies based here in Bristol and is providing skilled jobs in manufacturing, engineering and supply chain roles.

Many of these jobs require training to acquire specialist new skills needed to help keep the UK aerospace sector at the forefront of this high technology industry.

The MOD is playing its part in contributing to our long-term economic plan and this A400M programme will become an important contributor to the defence supply chain, here in Bristol, for years to come.

To mark the honour, the “City of Bristol” A400M Atlas recently completed a fly-past of the Clifton Suspension Bridge which also served as a reminder of the engineering history of the city.

Chief of Materiel Air, Air Marshal Simon Bollom said:


The naming of the Royal Air Force’s first A400M aircraft as City of Bristol reflects a continuation of historical ties between Bristol and the Royal Air Force.

Bristol is at the heart of the UK aerospace community which has progressed through time and industry from the Bristol built engines like Jupiter - the most successful aero engine of the 1920s - through to famous jets such as Concorde.

This tradition continues with state of the art work being carried out at Airbus’s Filton site on wings for the A400M, supported by complex work packages from GKN, Rolls-Royce and Atkins and this rare naming honour is recognition for the long and entrenched affiliation between the City of Bristol and British aviation.

Manufactured by Airbus Defence & Space the A400M Atlas will replace the existing fleet of C-130 Hercules and represents major advances on its predecessor, with it capable of flying considerably faster, twice as far and able to carry almost twice as much cargo.

Continue reading...
 
#2
Am I right in thinking that the claims flying twice as far as a Hercules are carrying twice the load have been disputed on ARRSE?
 
#3
Am I right in thinking that the claims flying twice as far as a Hercules are carrying twice the load have been disputed on ARRSE?
Twice as far (with the same load) or twice the load (ish) I think is nearer the mark


Edit at higher Payload weights the Hercs range drop off significantly.
 
#6
Betcha the C-130 stays in service to do the jobs the FATLAS can't.
By the time the last ones delivered, they will be fully capable, however I firmly believe somebody will have to decide buying another half dozen A400s, because It looks to me that the fleet wont be large enough.

I cant see the Hercs stopping on by all accounts they will need some major work soon, cost in that and the 3rd type logistics chain and new A400s are probably worth it.
 
#7
By the time the last ones delivered, they will be fully capable, however I firmly believe somebody will have to decide buying another half dozen A400s, because It looks to me that the fleet wont be large enough.

I cant see the Hercs stopping on by all accounts they will need some major work soon, cost in that and the 3rd type logistics chain and new A400s are probably worth it.

There ya go, there is no attrition capacity with the A400M, lose one, lose a big chunk of capacity.
It's too big and expensive for tactical jobs in inhospitable terrain. We've boxed ourselves into a corner where we now have two types of strategic air lifters and are going to use one as a tactical lifter.

C-17 + C-130 makes sense
C-17 + A400M makes none.
 
#8
There ya go, there is no attrition capacity with the A400M, lose one, lose a big chunk of capacity.
It's too big and expensive for tactical jobs in inhospitable terrain. We've boxed ourselves into a corner where we now have two types of strategic air lifters and are going to use one as a tactical lifter.

C-17 + C-130 makes sense
C-17 + A400M makes none.
You keep saying this and you have completely missed the small flaw in your statement.

The RAF operational budget only funds so many personnel and airframes.
It isn't (as you imply ) a choice between 8 C17 and 30 Herc or 8 C17 and 18 -20 A400
Its between 8 C17 and 18- 20 Herc or 8 C17 and 18 -20 A400.

With that in mind the A400 does make sense particularly as even the US now consider the C130 to small and are looking at a larger airframe.

Edit - Nor is the A400 a strategic airlifter, It a large tactical that can provide limited strategic lift, which has allowed the French to avoid buying C17.
 
#10
You keep saying this and you have completely missed the small flaw in your statement.

The RAF operational budget only funds so many personnel and airframes.
It isn't (as you imply ) a choice between 8 C17 and 30 Herc or 8 C17 and 18 -20 A400
Its between 8 C17 and 18- 20 Herc or 8 C17 and 18 -20 A400.

With that in mind the A400 does make sense particularly as even the US now consider the C130 to small and are looking at a larger airframe.

Edit - Nor is the A400 a strategic airlifter, It a large tactical that can provide limited strategic lift, which has allowed the French to avoid buying C17.

The A400M was a political buy. After delays forced MOD to buy C-17's, the case for a 'big' airlifter like A400 went right out the window. The preferred option was a few more C-17's and a slew of new build C-130's, but hey ho, we had top be seen to be rather good Europeans and buy a plane that was hugely late, under performing and over priced and is still facing significant programme issues.
 
#11
The A400M was a political buy. After delays forced MOD to buy C-17's, the case for a 'big' airlifter like A400 went right out the window. The preferred option was a few more C-17's and a slew of new build C-130's, but hey ho, we had top be seen to be rather good Europeans and buy a plane that was hugely late, under performing and over priced and is still facing significant programme issues.
Ref Bold Agree

Ref Red -
Up until a few years ago I would have agreed, but equipment has got bulkier and as I have said previously even the Americans don't think the Herc is good enough anymore. We are where we are and whilst way back when, the wish may have been C17 and C13 mix. I think in light of recent cuts had the UK gone that route the RAF would be lamenting that they don't have A400.

Ref Blue
\the majority of the A400 Problems are the same as Typhoons - certain customers (who ordered suspiciously large numbers ) now looking for any excuse to offload or avoid buying them.

That's not to say there were no development problems but that's par for the course.
 
#12
Sigh...:roll:

Regards,
MM
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
Allow me,
<Tilts head to sky, with the back of his pressed to his forehead>
Oh Woe is I, for I despair at the wilful vomiting of old canards every time this subject crops up on Arrse. When will such mindlessness and dreary repetition every end. Oh Woe, Oh Woe is I.
<Clasps hands to face and starts sobbing>
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
So what's wrong with the A400? Apart from the fact that the propellers appear to be a bit bent.

MsG
 
#17
My sigh was merely frustration that we're about to go around the same A400M buoy as the dedicated thread on the RAF forum.

There's nothing intrinsicly wrong with the A400M. In time, it will mature into an excellent aircraft. Whether it's the correct aircraft for the RAF however is another argument entirely.

Regards,
MM
 
#18
My sigh was merely frustration that we're about to go around the same A400M buoy as the dedicated thread on the RAF forum.

There's nothing intrinsicly wrong with the A400M. In time, it will mature into an excellent aircraft. Whether it's the correct aircraft for the RAF however is another argument entirely.

Regards,
MM
Is the RAF itself divided on this issue?.

** I mean beyond "Buy it its new and shiny" and I was born in this Herc, I was married in this Herc and I will Die etc. type arguments.
 
#19
The UK’s first A400M Atlas has been named “City of Bristol” by the Royal Air Force in a rare honour to highlight the important role industry in the city has played in the delivery of the aircraft.

The wings of the next-generation military transporter plane were designed and manufactured at the Airbus factory in Filton, Bristol, with a number of other businesses in the city, including Rolls-Royce, GKN Aerospace, and Atkins, demonstrating a range of high quality aerospace skills which support the A400M programme.

A total of 22 A400M Atlas aircraft have been ordered by the Ministry of Defence’s procurement arm, Defence, Equipment and Support (DE&S), which is also based in the city at Abbey Wood.


A400M Altas 'City of Bristol' facts and figures

The naming of the aircraft is a special privilege for Bristol, since it is unusual for the RAF to name an individual aircraft in this way.

Speaking at a ceremony at the Airbus site to mark the event, Defence Minister Philip Dunne said:


The A400M programme has created or secured work for around 900 people at companies based here in Bristol and is providing skilled jobs in manufacturing, engineering and supply chain roles.

Many of these jobs require training to acquire specialist new skills needed to help keep the UK aerospace sector at the forefront of this high technology industry.

The MOD is playing its part in contributing to our long-term economic plan and this A400M programme will become an important contributor to the defence supply chain, here in Bristol, for years to come.

To mark the honour, the “City of Bristol” A400M Atlas recently completed a fly-past of the Clifton Suspension Bridge which also served as a reminder of the engineering history of the city.

Chief of Materiel Air, Air Marshal Simon Bollom said:


The naming of the Royal Air Force’s first A400M aircraft as City of Bristol reflects a continuation of historical ties between Bristol and the Royal Air Force.

Bristol is at the heart of the UK aerospace community which has progressed through time and industry from the Bristol built engines like Jupiter - the most successful aero engine of the 1920s - through to famous jets such as Concorde.

This tradition continues with state of the art work being carried out at Airbus’s Filton site on wings for the A400M, supported by complex work packages from GKN, Rolls-Royce and Atkins and this rare naming honour is recognition for the long and entrenched affiliation between the City of Bristol and British aviation.

Manufactured by Airbus Defence & Space the A400M Atlas will replace the existing fleet of C-130 Hercules and represents major advances on its predecessor, with it capable of flying considerably faster, twice as far and able to carry almost twice as much cargo.

Continue reading...

Yeah thanks for that!!

Just worked my arse off for the last two days preparing "nibbles" for assorted VIP's and associated hangers on.

Overtime on a Sunday?
I wish.
 

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