News story: Sky's the limit for defence personnel taking part in Edinburgh Tattoo

#1
The RAF will be the lead presentational service, in its centenary year, for a new show marking the theme of ‘The Sky’s the Limit’.

The band of the Royal Air Force College, and pipers and drummers from across the Service, will play a central role in the world famous show. Three serving RAF personnel also star in this year’s Tattoo advertising campaign.

In 2 of the adverts Flight Lieutenants Jonny Dowen (main image) and Mikaela Harrison, from RAF Conningsby’s 29 Squadron and RAF Falcons display team, transform from a highland drummer into a Typhoon pilot, and from a highland dancer into parachutist. In a third version, RAF Honnington’s Senior Aircraftman Christopher Craig changes from being a RAF Regiment gunner into a bagpiper (below).


Royal Air Force Regiment gunner into a bagpiper. Image credit: The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo

The Royal Navy and army musicians also taking part in this year’s Tattoo include the Royal Marine Band Plymouth, The Band of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, and pipers and drummers from The 1st, 2nd and 4th Battalions, The Royal Regiment of Scotland (1, 2 and 4 SCOTS), The Royal Dragoon Guards, The Queen’s Royal Hussars and The Scots Guards.

Brigadier David Allfrey, Chief Executive and Producer of The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, said:


We are delighted to support RAF100 in their role as the lead Service at this year’s Tattoo. Under our own theme of The Sky’s The Limit, we will explore gravity, the history of manned flight, even into space, and the power of human potential.

We are looking forward to exploring all manner of creative possibilities and collaborations in the production, in the international cast, in the music, in the lighting and projection and in special effects. There are exciting prospects, some of which are out of this world!

Taking place against the iconic backdrop of Edinburgh Castle to a live audience of 220,000, the Tattoo extravaganza returns for 24 performances with a 100 minute showcase of music, dance and technical wizardry, including some of the world’s finest military bands and performers.

The Tattoo was set up and run for charitable purposes. It has gifted £10 million to service and civilian organisations including the Soldiers Charity (formerly known as the Army Benevolent Fund) and RAF Benevolent Fund.

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#3
What a massive waste of defence budget money, which should be used for defence, not entertainment!
Hardly. A "massive waste" would be spending a billion pounds on FRES but not actually getting any vehicles out of it.

Having a few score service personnel spend three weeks at a fairly high profile KAPE event isn't "massive" - but you'll no doubt be opposed to other "massive wastes" like dress uniform, any form of display team, adventurous training, etc, etc.

Sure your name isn't Oliver Cromwell? "Ban Christmas!"
 
#5
What a massive waste of defence budget money, which should be used for defence, not entertainment!
RAF Pipes and Drums is a volunteer band, so all it costs is the T&S for the members to travel from their home units. They stay in MOD accommodation in Edinburgh.
The Tattoo is hugely popular, has foreign military bands queuing up to be invited to take part, and raises a load of cash for military charities.


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#7
#10
It must be a good money spinner for the wider economy in Edinburgh from tacky gift shops to hotel accommodation to B&Bs and transport. The place would be booked solid for a year in advance. It may cost the MOD a very small amount but the tax benefits to Scotland would be great.
 
#11
I live here and serve up here. It was a massive PITA. Tourism really had no up side in the city from the locals point of view. The MOD will not disclose how much it costs them. It is a vanity project, used for entertaining. May be the UK forces should get in to comedy, as we become a laughing stock :)
 
#12
So does this count as the cünt's annual pass for his "5 miler of death"?

It is harder to imagine a crappier image than the one below. Congratulations in making the RAF Regiment gunner involved look like a screaming and mincing fairy... or was that all part of the plan?

PIPER_GOVUK.jpg
 
#13
I live here and serve up here. It was a massive PITA. Tourism really had no up side in the city from the locals point of view. The MOD will not disclose how much it costs them. It is a vanity project, used for entertaining. May be the UK forces should get in to comedy, as we become a laughing stock :)
Have you look at booking a hotel in Edinburgh during this three week period. Restaurants are full and tartan tat is flying off the shelves. If you live in the city it is a pain just like the fringe but the wider benefits are great.
 
#16
Unless you look at it from a rather narrow perspective, you're wrong.

Current estimates for the Edinburgh Festivals alone are a £280 million a year benefit to the Edinburgh economy, >£300 million / 6,000 full-time equivalent jobs to Scottish economy all told.[/QUO

I was talking about the Tattoo which is used by old crusty types to show off to friends. Waste of defence resources.

The festival is nice, but is a massive PITA for us living here. And if the money come back to the council, they certainly don't spend it on us in the city. The place is falling apart, the roads are clogged and broken. We really can't take any more. Hopefully the tourist tax will help.
 
#20
...The festival is nice, but is a massive PITA for us living here. And if the money come back to the council, they certainly don't spend it on us in the city...
In which case, may I suggest you complain to the Scottish Parliament or your local council then, rather than dripping on here. Some however may suggest that Scotland already receives disproportionate benefits from the UK.

More broadly, events such as the Tattoo, RIAT and Trooping the Colour/Queen’s Birthday Flypast are valuable Defence Engagement events. This allows all 3 services to invite attaches, senior officers, other personnel and teams from key allies (and occasionally non-allies) along where ‘informal talks’ and contacts can be fostered.

The resulting benefits to Defence are difficult to quantify financially, but are no less tangible.

Regards,
MM
 

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