News story: Reservists skills boost for business

Skills training can be one of the biggest expenses that companies and organisations face.

As part of a successful career in the reserves a person will develop a broad range of skills through their military training which can help them when back in their civilian jobs.

A civilian employer would have to fork out over £8,000 on commercial civilian training to provide the same amount of development that an average reservist can gain in just 1 year of military service.

Skills gained include:

  • Leadership
  • Health and safety
  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Problem solving and decision making
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Communication Skills
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A career in the armed forces reserves can provide exciting and unique opportunities but the benefits of the skills that individuals receive can be felt beyond our armed forces, and training is just one specific area that civilian employers can tap into.

BT is one of Britain’s leading advocates for supporting military personnel and recognises the value of employing Reservists.

The CEO of BT Openreach Joe Garner said:


BT has a long tradition of supporting Britain’s armed forces, including hiring around 2,000 veterans into Openreach in recent years.

We also believe that supporting reservists brings benefits to both us as employer, the individuals concerned and the wider society. The transfer of skills, knowledge and professional development is a win.

We are proud to help these courageous people have the opportunity to connect and protect Britain.

Specialist and role specific training will boost this even further, saving employers thousands of pounds.

Continue reading...
 

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LE
Can't think of any downsides to employing a reservist who may be obliged to disappear for months of PDT, deployment and POTL.

Very different prospect from days of yore, when an employer got all those benefits in the blurb, and only lost their bod for a fortnight at most.
 
'Can get' does not equate to 'Will get'.
I 'can get' all sorts of things. I 'can't get' on the courses though.
I did get athlete's foot once. Does that count?
 
I presume it's aimed at large businesses. Ammunition to argue their case when asked why reservists are being allowed to take a year off work to go and play soldiers.
 
In most civvy firms they have budgets for training as and when it's required. When the boss decides that Fred may be suitable in a supervisory role, and there's a supervisory vacancy in the forseeable future, Fred will be sent on the relevant training.
Alternately, however much supervisory experience Fred gains in the reserves, his boss isn't going to pay him any more nor make a vacancy to please Fred.
And if Fred's deployed, it's costing the boss to replace him. If Bill is of the same standard as Fred, but not a reservist and so unlikely to disappear at short notice for months, which would the boss invest his money in?
 
In most civvy firms they have budgets for training as and when it's required. When the boss decides that Fred may be suitable in a supervisory role, and there's a supervisory vacancy in the forseeable future, Fred will be sent on the relevant training.
Alternately, however much supervisory experience Fred gains in the reserves, his boss isn't going to pay him any more nor make a vacancy to please Fred.
And if Fred's deployed, it's costing the boss to replace him. If Bill is of the same standard as Fred, but not a reservist and so unlikely to disappear at short notice for months, which would the boss invest his money in?
I made a similar point from the perpective of the Army side of the Reserve equation on the Reservist thread. In that case, there were a number of Reg Trg Centres around the country where SNCOs in particular had been appointed away from their Bns and made significant contributions and deserved promotion, but with rank ranged posts when they returned to RD they often found their peers had been promoted over them, often with less experience and qualification and significantly less MTDs.

The issue as with the civvie job @Oscar1Whisky presents the 'out of sight out of mind' complex, its a natural human trait and whilst unfair it happens in a lot of different work environments. SMEs in particular suffer from high employee costs and do not have the luxury to hold positions open or potentially damage morale for other staff.

One has to look at it from a skillfade perspective too, if a reservist is pulled away from their civvie job to go on Ops, there will inevitably be a proportionate skill fade in their civvie trade, despite maybe acquiring some 'supervisory skills' in the military role. For example, the software engineer who deploys as an infanteer will miss a significant amount of IT progression in 9 or 12 months. There are many other trades or professions where this occurs too.Iit is one of those areas where the MoD has been less than clear about how retraining or upskilling (post deployment) for their civvie job can be / will be addressed practically or through compensation. There are undoubtedly benefits of skills learned or reinforced in the military role, but there is another side to the equation, notably for SMEs who represent the bulk of AR employers, where skill fade and 'out of sight' factors apply.
 
At the risk of being cynical, you could argue that you could gain the same skillsets from being a scout leader, helping to run an amateur sports team or getting involved with the board of governors/PTA at a school.
 
There's also the matter that, in most skills and trades, the military are way behind the civvy equivalent, so I'm not so sure that civil life gains much from the exchange.
Take something as simple as truck driving: while the army will buy a fleet and run it for up to 30 years, civvy operators generally replace with new models every 5 years or less. Technology moves quickly, and military vehicles are quite often nearing obsolescence by the time they're brought into service .
As one example, for gulf war 1 we'd a sudden influx of "new" Bedford TMs, a model that was so old at the time that it had been out of production at least 10 years, even the factory that built them had closed.
At the same time, civvy operators were happily driving modern trucks with all mod cons, including driver's bunk, cab heaters, radios etc.

So while changing parts on either may be similar, what would the civvy firm gain by its staff using out of date machinery?
 

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