News story: New offshore patrol vessels for Royal Navy

Ministry of Defence said:
The new ships will be built by BAE Systems at their shipyards on the Clyde in a deal that will sustain jobs in the UK’s warship-building industry, and will play a key role in counter-terrorism, counter-piracy and anti-smuggling operations.
The agreement with BAE Systems provides work for the company between the completion of the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers and the Type 26 Global Combat Ship, securing the vital skills needed to build the UK’s future warships.
Defence Secretary Philip Hammond is also announcing today that more than £100 million will be invested in Her Majesty’s (HM) Naval Base Portsmouth, which will be home to both HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales. The money will expand the dockyard to ensure it is ready for the arrival of the Royal Navy’s biggest ever warships as well as for the Type 45 destroyers which are based in Portsmouth.
Under the terms of a business agreement signed with BAE Systems in 2009, MOD would have been liable to pay for any periods when no shipbuilding was taking place at UK yards.
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Royal Navy River Class offshore patrol vessels HMS Tyne, HMS Severn and HMS Mersey (library image) [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Al Macleod, Crown copyright]Building offshore patrol vessels means not only are staff at BAE Systems able to continue to work and maintain their skills, but also the Royal Navy benefits from 3 new ships and the taxpayer gets much better value for money.
The cost of building the ships is funded from money that would have been used to pay for idle capacity, finance redundancies and meet the cost of industrial restructuring.
Portsmouth will maintain its proud maritime heritage as the home of much of the Royal Navy’s surface fleet and the centre of BAE Systems’ ship support and maintenance business.
Mr Hammond said:
This deal will provide the Royal Navy with 3 brand new maritime patrol vessels with a wide range of capabilities which will support our national interests and those of our overseas territories.
This is an investment not only in 3 ships but also in this country’s warship-building industry. It prevents workers standing idle and sustains the vital skills needed to build the planned Type 26 frigate in the future.
I am also pleased to announce additional investment in Portsmouth Naval Base to prepare for the significant increase in tonnage as the home port for the Royal Navy’s aircraft carriers and destroyers.
Work on the new offshore patrol vessels is due to begin next year, with the first ship being delivered to the Royal Navy in 2017. The ships are expected to replace the current, smaller River Class vessels, HM Ships Tyne, Severn and Mersey, which have been policing the UK’s waters since 2003, but a final decision will be taken in the next strategic defence and security review.
Admiral Sir George Zambellas, the First Sea Lord, said:
These new patrol vessels will build on the proven performance of the River Class by adding a flight deck to take the Navy’s Merlin helicopters and by adding operational flexibility through extra storage capacity and accommodation. They are very welcome.


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Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
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These new patrol vessels will build on the proven performance of the River Class by adding a flight deck to take the Navy’s Merlin helicopters and by adding operational flexibility through extra storage capacity and accommodation.

Standby for all RN presence and deployments to be covered by offshore patrol vessels.

One day West Indies Guard Ship will be one of these things.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Standby for all RN presence and deployments to be covered by offshore patrol vessels.

One day West Indies Guard Ship will be one of these things.

Probably, but would rather have something a little larger that could hanger a dedicated helicopter. These look like the evolved Clyde, 3 of which Brazil just got. Well at least they are doing something to keep capacity and jobs ticking over.
 
Standby for all RN presence and deployments to be covered by offshore patrol vessels.

One day West Indies Guard Ship will be one of these things.

it'll be fine, keep them far enough offshore and no one will be able to tell the difference
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The future RN will look like this:

1x Carrier that never goes to sea due to cost (the other will be prematurely sold or scrapped).
1x Albion/Bulwark LPD that will be the flagship.
T45 Destroyers that make up the actual beef of the RN, i.e. in a war we send one of those.
Loads of these River Class boats doing the current work of the T23s, covering long standing RN commitments and being the token UK component of international operations and exercises.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Ahhh but is there room for a cocktail party?

There is always room for a cocktail party. The reason they've had to improve the design of the existing River Class is because you can't put a marquee up on the Focsle.

Very important capability for a warship. The actual reason they binned the Batch 3 T22s was because the bar and onboard ice making facility was not capable of keeping up with operational demands.
 
Is that rust spewing out of the anchor chain?

Handy for a bit of gunboat diplomacy. Not the rust, the pretty little boat.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Is that rust spewing out of the anchor chain?

Handy for a bit of gunboat diplomacy. Not the rust, the pretty little boat.

It'll be a combo of rusty water and the brown shitty grease the dabbers slap all over the anchor chain to stop it rusting.

No point trying to paint over it, it always comes back. Look at the state of the returning ships from the Falklands. That's how quickly a ship deteriorates when you don't have 100 lads turned to everyday stripping and repainting everything.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I've been on a River boat in the past few months (Tyne) and it was quite an impressive affair.

Just a thought, there is plenty of space inside, the rec spaces for the crew and accom are massive. Why not sacrifice some of this space and whack a small tracking radar on there somewhere with a small missile silo or even Harpoon?

Instant baby AAW platform.
 
Value for money ??????

The RN is paying to keep shipyards open building ships that will be over budget and cost more than they would if made elsewhere, and aren't required the ships they will replace will not even be 15 years old.

We have OPVs sailing into the roughest seas in the world that are up to 35 years old (with more modern ones as well and 2 new ones on the way).

If the MOD has to pay to keep them open does that not say that the industry is uneconomic, non-profitable, unsustainable and inefficient ?!


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Value for money ??????

The RN is paying to keep shipyards open building ships that will be over budget and cost more than they would if made elsewhere, and aren't required the ships they will replace will not even be 15 years old.

We have OPVs sailing into the roughest seas in the world that are up to 35 years old (with more modern ones as well and 2 new ones on the way).

If the MOD has to pay to keep them open does that not say that the industry is uneconomic, non-profitable, unsustainable and inefficient ?!


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3 extra boats not replacements. This is what happened to the surplus following the saving and budget trimming I'd guess. If they don't spend it the NHS will be giving more slappers bigger/smaller tits/lips.
 
3 extra boats not replacements. This is what happened to the surplus following the saving and budget trimming I'd guess. If they don't spend it the NHS will be giving more slappers bigger/smaller tits/lips.

"The ships are expected to replace... smaller River class..."


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rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The new Irish boats built at a British Yard, were priced at $125million for the pair, though these doesn't include the additional weapons systems, which adds another $10millin, so around $67.5 million each, HTMS Krabi, another vessel of the proposed new class, was around $80million. Though building 3 will bring the cost down marginally. So they are much of a muchness.
 
The future RN will look like this:

1x Carrier that never goes to sea due to cost (the other will be prematurely sold or scrapped).
1x Albion/Bulwark LPD that will be the flagship.
T45 Destroyers that make up the actual beef of the RN, i.e. in a war we send one of those.
Loads of these River Class boats doing the current work of the T23s, covering long standing RN commitments and being the token UK component of international operations and exercises.

Don't forget the token FAS (Fleet Air Sqn, both of them)
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Value for money ??????

The RN is paying to keep shipyards open building ships that will be over budget and cost more than they would if made elsewhere, and aren't required the ships they will replace will not even be 15 years old.

We have OPVs sailing into the roughest seas in the world that are up to 35 years old (with more modern ones as well and 2 new ones on the way).

If the MOD has to pay to keep them open does that not say that the industry is uneconomic, non-profitable, unsustainable and inefficient ?!


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Going by the article, the MoD would had to stump up the money anyway

The cost of building the ships is funded from money that would have been used to pay for idle capacity, finance redundancies and meet the cost of industrial restructuring”

So pay BAe £150million to fund the downsizing and increase the number of unemployed people, show a\ perceived disregard to the people of Scotland.

Or

Pay BAe £150million, to keep people employed, yards busy, win political points re the Independence debate and get 3 new boats out of it.

Which makes more sense to you?
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Just the sort of things that could have been built in Portsmouth ...
 

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