• This is a stand-to for an incoming competition, one of our most expensive yet.
    Later this week we're going to be offering the opportunity to Win £270 Rab Neutrino Pro military down jacket
    Visit the thread at that link above and Watch it to be notified as soon as the competition goes live

News story: MOD reveals £160 billion plan to equip Armed Forces

#1
Ministry of Defence said:
For the first time, the government has set out a fully-funded Defence Equipment Plan totalling almost £160 billion.
The affordability of this plan has been scrutinised by the National Audit Office (NAO) and their independent analysis is also published today. The NAO makes clear that the MOD has:

  • substantially revised the way it compiles and manages the equipment plan and is now approaching the task on a more prudent basis;
  • taken difficult decisions to address what was estimated to be a £74 billion gap between its forecast funding and costs;
  • taken significant positive steps designed to deal with the accumulated affordability gap and lay the foundations for stability going forward.
And concludes that if it continues along this path:

  • the department will be able to demonstrate it has really turned a corner.

A Warrior infantry fighting vehicle patrolling near Afghan villages in Helmand province [Picture: Corporal Steven Peacock, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]The publication of the equipment plan follows the Defence Secretary’s announcement last year that the Defence Budget has been balanced for the first time in more than a decade and that the MOD is taking a new approach to financial planning.
Within the equipment and equipment support budget of around £160 billion over the next ten years, Philip Hammond has introduced for the first time a contingency of £4.8 billion to manage cost variation and protect existing projects.
In addition, within the £160 billion, £8 billion is currently unallocated. This will be allocated as new equipment priorities emerge over the decade and only once the MOD is confident that they are affordable and therefore deliverable.
Priorities will be decided by the Armed Forces Committee, chaired by the Chief of the Defence Staff.
Structuring the Defence Equipment Plan and the budget that supports it in this way will enable the MOD to deliver Future Force 2020.

An 11 Squadron Typhoon at RAF Coningsby [Picture: Senior Aircraftman Steve Buckley, Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]The equipment plan includes the following major investments in state-of-the-art military capabilities and their support over the next ten years:

  • £35.8 billion on submarines and the deterrent, including a total of seven Astute Class attack submarines and developing a replacement for Vanguard Class ballistic missile submarines;
  • £18.5 billion on combat air, including Lightning II and Typhoon fast jets and unmanned aerial vehicles;
  • £17.4 billion on ships, including Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers, six new Type 45 destroyers and the development of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship;
  • £13.9 billion on aircraft for air-to-air refuelling, passenger and heavy lift, such as Voyager and A400M;
  • £12.3 billion on armoured fighting vehicles, including Warrior, Scout and other land equipment;
  • £12.1 billion on helicopters, including Chinook, Apache, Puma and Wildcat; and
  • £11.4 billion on weapons, for example, missiles, torpedoes and precision guided bombs.

An Army reservist on a training exercise in Italy [Picture: Sergeant Russ Nolan RLC, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]The Defence Equipment Plan gives the defence industry more information than ever before about the MOD’s priorities to enable them to invest in the capabilities the military will require.
Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:
It is essential that our forces are fully equipped to respond to the range of threats we face in this uncertain world. This £160 billion equipment plan will ensure the UK’s Armed Forces remain among the most capable and best equipped in the world, providing the military with the confidence that the equipment they need is fully funded.
For the first time in a generation the Armed Forces will have a sustainable equipment plan.
Step by step, we are clearing up the culture of over-promising and under-delivering that created a multi-billion pound black hole in the Defence Budget. Today’s NAO report confirms that we were right to take the difficult decisions to cut unaffordable expenditure and balance the books.
Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir David Richards, said:
Successful operations rely on a proper equipment programme based on sustained funding into the future. Through the Armed Forces Committee to the Defence Board, all 3 Services now have greater input and more certainty than ever before about what equipment they will have and when.
The clarity provided by the equipment plan builds on the confidence in the budget and shows that Future Force 2020 is affordable and achievable. Our Armed Forces will have the capabilities to respond to global threats and provide the nation’s defence.


More...
 
#2
Tip: When farming out the contracts, use this line; "We want this, we want it to do that, we want it to be the best in the world, we want it by this date. Overdue, over budget, over whatever, you can stick it up your arse and we'll buy somebody elses".
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Tip, when farming our contracts give somebody the contract and then don't **** about with it. If you think you're going to need ashtrays in your little tankie, order ashtrays. Don't take it as a "cost saving" then ask for it later. It costs a **** of a lot more to add it in during the contract than at the start.
 
#4
Call me cynical, but IIRC those are all programs that have been announced at least once before.

I'd be more impressed if I saw some items relating to the defence estate including accommodation, barracks, and training facilities (including ranges).

After losing the rotten boroughs vote the other day, Dave's pronouncements on future intent are rather irrelevant.
 
#5
It's all bullshit, bait put out by mandarins and MPs who have noticed a chill in the dining rooms and gentlemen's clubs of late, one of them even had to buy his own lunch!

"Pay as you dine" may be a disaster, but "bribe as we dine" is and always was a winner!
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
It's all bullshit, bait put out by mandarins and MPs who have noticed a chill in the dining rooms and gentlemen's clubs of late, one of them even had to buy his own lunch!

"Pay as you dine" may be a disaster, but "bribe as we dine" is and always was a winner!
I ****ing wish. The procurement mandarins are so bloody scared of anything these days that I can't even buy them a coffee in abbey wood, let alone whisk the director off to a golf day. My handicap is suffering.
 
#7
35.8 billion on submarines and the deterrent, including a total of seven Astute Class attack submarines and developing a replacement for Vanguard Class ballistic missile submarines;

£18.5 billion on combat air, including Lightning II and Typhoon fast jets and unmanned aerial vehicles;

£17.4 billion on ships, including Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers, six new Type 45 destroyers and the development of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship;

£13.9 billion on aircraft for air-to-air refuelling, passenger and heavy lift, such as Voyager and A400M;

£12.3 billion on armoured fighting vehicles, including Warrior, Scout and other land equipment;

£12.1 billion on helicopters, including Chinook, Apache, Puma and Wildcat; and

£11.4 billion on weapons, for example, missiles, torpedoes and precision guided bombs.

and less than £35.87p on service accommodation.
 
#8
Why are submarines and ships so expensive? They have been around longer than anything else (except men).

And they are still welded and riveted steel.
 
#9
Why are submarines and ships so expensive? They have been around longer than anything else (except men).

And they are still welded and riveted steel.
You pop off to sea in a riveted submarine if you want and I'll stay here holding your wallet and wench, you'll not be seeing them again. A ship's hull may be cheap, but some of the things that go "ping" are a tad on the very very expensive side, clue: they're made by BAe.
 
#10
Always seems to me that MOD procurement was like a kid in a toyshop. Throw some money on the table then ask, "what can have for this mister" ?

"Oh how about something a bit cheaper, and then we can have some more".

Should see some real savings soon. Troops brought back from AFG, so less munitions used.

Loads made redundant so less wages, less money spent on training etc.
 
#11
"Why are submarines and ships so expensive? They have been around longer than anything else (except men)."

Wah shield on - the actual steel is cheap. The challenge is twofold - firstly its the weapon systems and electronics that are bloody expensive. You are essentially paying the big money for something that has situational awareness and which can float move and fight, rather than float, move and act as a target. Smaller ships are simples - look at something like a OPV, but the moment you want to do high end warfighting tasks, be prepared to spend a lot of money.
Secondly, everyone cites the example of how bulk carriers or other ships are cheap - they are cheap for a reason - fundamentally they are a bunch of empty storage facilities welded in close proximity with a bit of accommodation, propulsion and life support attached. Add the requirement to work in a modern warfighitng environment, operate aircraft, absorb damage and keep fighting and also work away from home for 6 months with minimal access to host nation support, and the bill goes up quite considerably.

Modern warships are probably the single most technologically challenging piece of military equipment in service today and there is a price tag associated with this.
 
#13
the bill goes up quite considerably.
On the subject of which,

Who reckons the final prices will be £320 billion for half the kit? We wont be able to afford taht so we'll settle for £100 bill for about an 1/8th of the kit... which will be late, over complex and sh1t.
 
#14
"Why are submarines and ships so expensive? They have been around longer than anything else (except men)."

Wah shield on - the actual steel is cheap. The challenge is twofold - firstly its the weapon systems and electronics that are bloody expensive. You are essentially paying the big money for something that has situational awareness and which can float move and fight, rather than float, move and act as a target. Smaller ships are simples - look at something like a OPV, but the moment you want to do high end warfighting tasks, be prepared to spend a lot of money.
Secondly, everyone cites the example of how bulk carriers or other ships are cheap - they are cheap for a reason - fundamentally they are a bunch of empty storage facilities welded in close proximity with a bit of accommodation, propulsion and life support attached. Add the requirement to work in a modern warfighitng environment, operate aircraft, absorb damage and keep fighting and also work away from home for 6 months with minimal access to host nation support, and the bill goes up quite considerably.

Modern warships are probably the single most technologically challenging piece of military equipment in service today and there is a price tag associated with this.
And yet I seem to recall that the C17 was quoted at 200 million against an estimated 400 million for a Type 26. Very happy to be corrected on that.
 

DieHard

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
I think a few arrsers could come up with better and more usefull weapon systems, not me though i would just re-issue the god of all rifles

Sent by Crapatalk. Sitting on my bog having a dump.
 
#16
I think a few arrsers could come up with better and more usefull weapon systems, not me though i would just re-issue the god of all rifles

Sent by Crapatalk. Sitting on my bog having a dump.
I fear practicality issues with that.

[video=youtube;nzBvREYEQ8Y]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzBvREYEQ8Y[/video]
 

Top