News story: HMS Queen Elizabeth is named

At 56 metres she is taller than Niagara Falls and, with a flight deck the size of 60 tennis courts, she is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy.

Today, at HMS Queen Elizabeth’s naming ceremony in Rosyth, Scotland, hundreds of workers who helped build her joined the ship’s company, the Prime Minister and the Defence Secretary to witness Her Majesty christen her namesake with a bottle of whisky.

Whilst traditionally a bottle of champagne is used to smash against the bow, given the carrier’s Scottish roots, it seemed most fitting for a bottle of Islay whisky to be used instead.

Operating with Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter jets, the Queen Elizabeth Class will be versatile enough to be used in a full range of military tasks, from war-fighting to providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

Incorporating the latest technologies, including a long-range 3D radar that can track a tennis ball travelling at 2,000 miles per hour, the carrier can also carry enough fuel to transport a family car to the moon and back 12 times.


The Queen Elizabeth naming ceremony at Rosyth [Picture: Crown copyright]
The UK at its best


The construction of HMS Queen Elizabeth has truly been an example of British engineering at its best, sustaining around 8,000 jobs at more than 100 companies across the UK.

Blocks of the ship were manufactured at yards up and down the country, in Devon, Portsmouth, on the Clyde, and on the Tyne, before being assembled in the dockyard at Rosyth.

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:


HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest ship that the Royal Navy has ever had, and is a true demonstration of the UK at its best, with over 10,000 people across the country working together to deliver her.

This occasion marks a major milestone in regenerating the UK’s aircraft carrier capability, enhancing our ability to project power anywhere in the world.
A new dawn


Admiral Sir George Zambellas, the First Sea Lord, said:


The naming of HMS Queen Elizabeth heralds a new dawn, not only for the Royal Navy but also for the delivery of our nation’s security. Her journey ahead will be global, strategic and one of inter-service and international partnership.

Powerful, versatile and credible, this ship will be at the heart of the UK’s defence capability for the next 50 years, but she already stands testament to the best of British shipbuilding, engineering and technology.

Now that she has been named, the dock will be flooded to enable HMS Queen Elizabeth to float for the first time. Work to prepare the ship for sea trials in 2017 and flight trials with Lightning II aircraft in 2018 will continue.

Work is already underway on HMS Queen Elizabeth’s sister ship, HMS Prince of Wales, which will start to be assembled in Rosyth dockyard later this year.

Stay up-to-date with the events happening at the naming ceremony by following our Storify page.

Queen Elizabeth Class videos


VIDEO: HMS Queen Elizabeth Facts

VIDEO: HMS Queen Elizabeth: Carrier Innovation

Continue reading...
 
"with a flight deck the size of 60 tennis courts"

I'd feel happier if they built it with a flight deck the size of a runway...

Rodney2q
 
At 56 metres she is taller than Niagara Falls and, with a flight deck the size of 60 tennis courts, she is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy.

That's about the height of 10 thousand Meerkats and a large herd of Wildebeest
 
Rodney - you know that the unit of measurement of surface area is "tennis court" for capital ships, "football pitch" for escorts and "ping-pong table" for minor war vessels.

In similar vein, height is to be measured in multiples of Nelson's column or stacked London double-decker buses and length in multiples of B-747 aircraft.

It's good to note that the British standard unit of measurement of target-size, the "tennis ball" and the BS unit of fuel capacity "sufficient for a family saloon car" have made an appearance in the announcement.

As there are sufficient of these units of measurement in the Press brief, we may all sleep soundly tonight.
 
At 56 metres she is taller than Niagara Falls and, with a flight deck the size of 60 tennis courts, she is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy.

That's about the height of 10 thousand Meerkats and a large herd of Wildebeest
WRONG unit of height.

Re-present.


ps: like the use of wildlife though. That shows environmental "green" credentials.
 
You would have thought that they'd have done some wind-tunnel modelling and given the ship a smoother nose, so as to get another couple of knots out of her. Typical lack of planning.
 
You would have thought that they'd have done some wind-tunnel modelling and given the ship a smoother nose, so as to get another couple of knots out of her. Typical lack of planning.
Thought that myself but in respect to a smooth air flow over the deck. I'm sure some one will give us an explanation
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'd hope she isn't constrained by bow into wind to launch the F35, I think those days were during the Battle of Midway.

Oh, and only 3x over budget - bargain!
 
R

renamed_user

Guest
You know your getting old when the Navy has a new ship that is expected to last 40-50 years, as I'm 47 I expect this ship will out last me.
 
I'd hope she isn't constrained by bow into wind to launch the F35, I think those days were during the Battle of Midway.
That is generally the MO for aircraft carriers, because every knot of airspeed counts when you're trying to maximise the take off weight (with fuel and payload).
 
Many years ago while I was working at the air int place at JARIC (at the tail end of the 80's), I attended a briefing about the (then) brand new Soviet carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov class.

One retired officer type Int Analyst stood up and, after explaining that he had had many, many years experience as a naval aviator in the fleet air arm, it was his professional opinion that the Soviet ship was fundamentally flawed in its design and that the flight deck would act as a "sail" under certain wind condition and that the ship would probably capsize during flight operations....

The general opinion amongst certain Int Corps analysts was that Soviet designers were generally pretty good and were most unlikely to have made such basic errors in the design.

I am pleased to note that the Admiral Kuznetsov is still in service...

:)

Rodney2q
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
It's good to note that the British standard unit of measurement of target-size, the "tennis ball" and the BS unit of fuel capacity "sufficient for a family saloon car" have made an appearance in the announcement.
Not quite. They've failed to tell how many times a Mini Cooper can drive to the moon and back on the fuel in the ship's bunkers. That used to be the British Standard. Is this something to do with metrication, and have we been sold short again?

Bloody Europeans.
 
Not quite. They've failed to tell how many times a Mini Cooper can drive to the moon and back on the fuel in the ship's bunkers. That used to be the British Standard. Is this something to do with metrication, and have we been sold short again?

Bloody Europeans.
Keep up. The BS had to be amended when Mini was sold to a foreign owner, which works in awful Napoleonic units of metric measurement.
 
It might, but in who's navy?
I'd like to think we can sell both of them to the Indians, thus saving us a lot of money and preventing any further Crusading PMs from engaging in foreign wars for the expansion of their egos. Alternately we should compulsorily transfer them to the new independent Scotland.
 
So - Just WHAT are they going to name her ?
 

simbo

LE
I'm glad it can track fast moving tennis balls- a very important feature for a modern warship although the chances of it getting near Wimbledon are pretty slim unless it is secretly fitted with wheels.
 

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