News story: Elite force of UK Armed Forces Cyber Reserves steps up to join fight against evolving threats

#1
As the nation marks Reserves Day today, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson praised these exceptionally talented people and called for more specialists such as engineers, chefs, media operations and electricians to step up and join the UK Armed Forces as Reservists.



Speaking at a reception for Reservists in the house of Commons last night, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:


Reservists play a vital role in our Armed Forces, bringing a huge range of experiences and skills to the defence of our country.

As the threats we face intensify we need to attract the brightest and the best from all walks of life as part of a modern military.

This morning the Defence Secretary thanked civil servant reservists at a specially hosted breakfast in 10 Downing St.



The men and women of our Reserve forces give up their free time training to work alongside regular troops around the world. From telecoms workers and police officers to students they serve our country when called upon in a huge variety of roles such as dog handlers, logistics movers, intelligence officers and medics.



Reservist Colonel Sion Walker is a teacher by trade. He is currently deployed as Commanding Officer of Op ORBITAL, which is a UK programme to train the Ukrainian military in non-lethal skills and tactics such as the identification of mines, medical care and logistics.

Colonel Sion Walker is leading the operation. He said:


For me, it’s important to give something back. I have been able to use my skill sets as an educator and in the Army to complement each other. In school it gave me a different outlook on life. Some people whinge about how bad things are, but thanks to my military experiences I have a better balance in life, which means I don’t get vexed.

It means you’re more robust as a person. And I’ve been able to give young people better advice in school. I get youngsters asking me for careers advice about joining any of the Armed forces, and that is very satisfying.

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#2
The bit they kept in the headline but left out of the post. So what makes them an 'elite force', except perhaps in their characters in 'Halo'?

'The Ministry of Defence’s hunt for gamers and amateur coders to become cyber Reserves has led to a massive increase in applications, creating an elite force of specialists ready to support operations using their unique cyber skills.'
 
#4
I'd step up to be a Reserve Member of Parliament, giving up my valuable free time for the same benefits as they get........any vacancies?
 
#5
I'd step up to be a Reserve Member of Parliament, giving up my valuable free time for the same benefits as they get........any vacancies?
So then, when the 'regular' member was deployed away from London and there was a contentious or critical vote in the Chamber, you could be his stunt-double and cast the vote on behalf of his/her constituency. A gleaming idea, but I don't think it'll catch on.
 
#7
The bit they kept in the headline but left out of the post. So what makes them an 'elite force', except perhaps in their characters in 'Halo'?

'The Ministry of Defence’s hunt for gamers and amateur coders to become cyber Reserves has led to a massive increase in applications, creating an elite force of specialists ready to support operations using their unique cyber skills.'
Post-Army I spent 8 years at Poly/New Uni/Red Brick Uni starting with an HND in software engineering and moving on up, picking up certificates along the way and finishing as a research assistant where I was teaching on graduate and undergraduate courses. Along the way I probably met less than 15 people who I would commend to anyone as a serious programming talent - those who read/generate code like others read comics.

I have worked with. met and presented to IS directors of major corporates, investment banks and consultanices and found that most of them have the equivalent of a degree in knitting prior to moving into IS/IT. I know of one IT director who was a fceking bandsman in the USMC and did business studies after his time.

Look on the other side of the coin at somewhere like Israel: They have state sanctioned after school computer clubs. These 'clubs' have a syllabus, compete with each other and are acknowledged as the nurseries for the official cyber command organisation Unit 8200. The kids are identified and sidelined into 8200 for their national service where they learn, practice and develop more skill's.

What do you get in the UK? Someone who is a dab hand at being the Master Chief in Halo, or has written an app to find the closest pizza takeaway.
 
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