News story: Camp Bastion troops say farewell to memorial wall

The memorial bears the names of all 453 UK personnel who have died on operations in Afghanistan and has been the focus for commemoration and reflection since it was erected.

Following the vigil ceremony last weekend it will be transported to the National Memorial Arboretum as the drawdown of UK combat operations nears its conclusion.

In a speech at the ceremony Brigadier Rob Thomson, the most senior UK military officer in Helmand province and Deputy Commander of Regional Command (Southwest), reflected on the sacrifice of British troops and those of other nations.

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A name plaque is taken down from the memorial wall [Picture: Corporal Mark Larner, Crown copyright]

He said:


We all have very particular, personal and often painful memories of the loss that has been felt across all 3 of our services.

The memorial wall has become a bastion of our collective memory of those who we have lost during this campaign.

It’s rightful and timely transfer from this land to ours will ensure that the memories of a foreign field are brought home in the right way and will endure for future generations.
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A name plaque from the memorial wall is packed away for transportation [Picture: Corporal Mark Larner, Crown copyright]

He also spoke about the progress that has been made possible by the commitment of the UK and coalition partners:


We have travelled some very hard yards in delivering this campaign but the achievements, delivered alongside our allies, the government of Afghanistan and the Afghan National Security Forces, are clear.

We leave behind a country that is no longer a haven for international terrorism. The progress made is tangible for ordinary Afghan people. They can look to a future of increasing hope and opportunity.

The deconstruction and repatriation of the memorial wall is the latest milestone as UK troops prepare to conclude combat operations at the end of this year.

The UK will then focus on continuing to support the Afghan National Army Officer Academy and the Afghan security ministries, with a small number of troops remaining in the country to provide force protection to UK elements.

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OldSnowy

LE
Book Reviewer
The new version will be erected in the NMA opposite the Basra Wall.

The two should complement each other nicely, and will allow future generations to look from one to t'other and wonder what the point was.
 
We have to reassure ourselves there is a point. Otherwise the sacrifice in Iraq and Afghanistan will be for nought.

RIP.
 
Can you remind me what the point was please? I forget.
Improvements in the living standards of the afghan population by whatever measure of humanity you wish to use and a democratic Iraq.

It'll take generations to see it. But they'll both be better places in the long run.
 
Improvements in the living standards of the afghan population by whatever measure of humanity you wish to use and a democratic Iraq.

It'll take generations to see it. But they'll both be better places in the long run.

"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one"
John Lennon, Oct 1971
 
We have to reassure ourselves there is a point. Otherwise the sacrifice in Iraq and Afghanistan will be for nought.

RIP.

OK I'm a civie but I do think History will provide the point. Iraq and Afghanistan sadly I think were just the start of a very long, for want of a better word "campaign".
 
Can you remind me what the point was please? I forget.

I think the salient points lost in time, to be examined by history. it's just that there needs to be a point of anything we do, especially where death and injury occur as a result.

Otherwise we might as well have shot 453 British troops and maimed many others in the UK
 
I am 56.
Is the naafi now called DFAC ?
And wtf is a pecan pie ? Some new manifestation of superheated horror masquerading as food in a soldiers recreational facility?

No, DFAC is the US cookhouse.
 
There was a point and solid reasoning behind it ....then the politicians got in the way and the military got the shitty stick to play with .

Lives lost , bodies damaged and minds ruined was sadly the result.

The good points get forgotten due to the negatives
 
We have to reassure ourselves there is a point. Otherwise the sacrifice in Iraq and Afghanistan will be for nought.

RIP.

We can reassure each other as much as you want. I'm afraid it was a waste of time. It won't even last as long as Iraq...
 
Improvements in the living standards of the afghan population by whatever measure of humanity you wish to use and a democratic Iraq.

It'll take generations to see it. But they'll both be better places in the long run.

Didn't know Tony lurked on ARRSE...
 

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