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News story: 9 in 10 reservists wear their uniforms with pride

Feedback gathered in the first tri-service reserves continuous attitude survey also revealed that 7 in 10 reservists feel well-motivated and supported by their employers.

The survey has been published for the first time today, 12 June, nearly a year after the government set out its new, improved offer for reservists and employers. Thanks to investment into better training and equipment, for the first time in 18 years, the size of the reserves is now increasing.

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A Royal Navy reservist takes part in a leadership exercise (library image)

The main findings revealed:

  • 91% of reservists feel proud to be in the reserves
  • 82% would recommend joining the reserves to others
  • 77% feel well-motivated
  • 73% of reservists are satisfied with life in the reserve forces
  • 69% feel that their employer supports their service; and
  • 65% say their reserve service has given them useful skills in their civilian jobs
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A Royal Air Force reservist working at RAF Brize Norton (library image) [Picture: Sergeant Pete Mobbs, Crown copyright]

Defence Minister Anna Soubry said:


It is extremely encouraging to see that the vast majority of reservists are proud to serve in the reserve forces and feel that it has equipped them with vital skills for their everyday jobs.

We know we can still do better which is why we are working closely with employers, local communities and reservists and are investing £1.8 billion in their training and equipment.
Uniform to Work Day

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Head of the British Army, General Sir Peter Wall, meets reservists working on CrossRail in London on Uniform to Work Day (library image) [Picture: Leading Photographer Dan Rosenbaum, Crown copyright]

With a massive 91% of reservists proud to serve their country, they will be given the opportunity to show this pride to their colleagues by taking part in Uniform to Work Day, when thousands of reservists across the country will hang up their usual work clothes and don their service uniforms.

This year Uniform to Work Day will take place on Wednesday 25 June, in the run up to the sixth annual Armed Forces Day on Saturday 28 June.

The UK reserve forces play a vital part in our nation’s defence. Find out how you can get involved and what is on offer for reserves.

Continue reading...
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
and 28% feel valued by the regulars. The full stats are worth a read, if you can be arrsed.
 
  • 91% of reservists feel proud to be in the reserves
  • 82% would recommend joining the reserves to others
  • 77% feel well-motivated
  • 73% of reservists are satisfied with life in the reserve forces
  • 69% feel that their employer supports their service; and
  • 65% say their reserve service has given them useful skills in their civilian jobs
  • 9% don't feel proud
  • 18% wouldn't recommend it
  • 23% don't feel well-motivated
  • 27% aren't satisfied
  • 31% don't feel supported by their employers
  • 35% don't get useful skills
These are the figures that need to be addressed - a quarter of the personnel seem to be on the verge of jacking - so it's hardly something to boast about.
 
and 28% feel valued by the regulars. The full stats are worth a read, if you can be arrsed.

But surely, they wouldn't try to mislead us...

  • Three quarters (73%) of reservists are satisfied with life in the reserve in general while one in ten (11%) are dissatisfied.
  • Nine in ten (91%) reservists feel proud to be in the reserves, and four fifths (82%) would recommend joining the reserves to others.
  • Over three quarters (77%) feel motivated to do the best job they can for the Reserve Force.
  • Half (49%) report feeling valued by society.
  • 3 in 10 (28%) agree that they feel valued by Regulars, while 4 in 10 (39%) disagree that they feel valued by Regulars.
  • Four fifths (81%) of reservists are in some form of civilian employment: Two thirds (66%) of reservists are employed full-time, 6% are employed part-time, and 9% are self-employed.
  • While over two thirds (69%) feel that their employer supports their reserve service, less than half (47%) feel that their employer values their reserve service, and a quarter (26%) believe that their employer would prefer that they were not a reservist.
  • Two thirds (65%) are satisfied with the quality of the training they have received for their current role.
  • 60% are satisfied with the amount of training they have received for their current role.
  • Half (51%) are satisfied with their opportunity to take part in Adventure Training.
  • Two fifths (40%) are satisfied with the support their family received from the Service when they were last mobilised, while a third (34%) are dissatisfied.
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploa..._data/file/318866/rescas_2014_main_report.pdf
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
  • 9% don't feel proud
  • 18% wouldn't recommend it
  • 23% don't feel well-motivated
  • 27% aren't satisfied
  • 31% don't feel supported by their employers
  • 35% don't get useful skills
These are the figures that need to be addressed - a quarter of the personnel seem to be on the verge of jacking - so it's hardly something to boast about.

How does that compare to regulars? Bearing in mind the traditional high turnover for the reserves, is that actually that bad?
How do you define useful skills? If my job involved shooting people, then yes my hobby does provide a useful skill. Its not so handy in a team meeting (not anyway - come the revolution...)
 
Two fifths (40%) are satisfied with the support their family received from the Service when they were last mobilised

I presume that these would be the single soldiers. The questionnaire didn't provide a distinction between single and married soldiers.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
91% of Reservists are proud to serve their country.
Have the other 9% been tracked down and stabbed for not being proud to serve their country.
That way the only in it for the cash twats can be removed from the roster.

Nice photo's by the way Woman, Woman & Ethnic minority any chance of a gay reservist in a wheelchair so I can tickl all the boxes.
 

marabout

Old-Salt
As ever, it is the soldiers who couldn’t be arsed to reply who would run a massive great truck through the stats given. Of course, they are the ones we need to engage if we are going to improve retention and reach the magical 30k.

100% of those that didn’t answer couldn’t be bothered
100% didn’t feel valued
100% wouldn’t recommend it etc.

Taking a sample in the way they do on the reserves just reinforces the positives.
 
How does that compare to regulars? Bearing in mind the traditional high turnover for the reserves, is that actually that bad?
How do you define useful skills? If my job involved shooting people, then yes my hobby does provide a useful skill. Its not so handy in a team meeting (not anyway - come the revolution...)

I don't believe that you can compare chalk and cheese. Discounting the 19% of AR soldiers for whom soldiering is evidently a prime source of income, it's comparing a job to a hobby (for some a very expensive one, at that).

How bad? It's bloody terrible. The AR recruits to a substantial extent by personal recommendation. If those recommendations aren't forthcoming, neither will the recruits. Then there's retention... Provision of interesting and meaningful training is an old chestnut and is a function of the CoC at all levels but requires an effective policy from the top and effective guidance down to the point of application. Posts on ARRSE suggest that such provision is, at best, hit and miss.

Useful skills? Man management where the manager has the benefit of rewards and punishments not available to the civvy manager? Debatable. Self-confidence, I'd agree with though even that would have to be tempered with over-confidence. There are some transferrable skills on offer - driving and plant operation are those that come readily to mind - but even then, they're dependent on the exigencies of the service. The Army gave me an SMSTS qualification (very desirable on the job market) but wouldn't stump up for a refresher when it expired. The reason? Regular holders of the qualification would expect to be posted out of its need before its expiry so attendance on a refresher course isn't budgeted for. AR holders tend to remain in post for much longer so end up doing their Army job with an out of date qualification. That's one of the effects of applying One Army to two very different organisations.
 
Pride? I used to wear my uniform because the army made me.
 
As ever, it is the soldiers who couldn’t be arsed to reply who would run a massive great truck through the stats given. Of course, they are the ones we need to engage if we are going to improve retention and reach the magical 30k.

100% of those that didn’t answer couldn’t be bothered
100% didn’t feel valued
100% wouldn’t recommend it etc.

Taking a sample in the way they do on the reserves just reinforces the positives.
Yours is a very interesting reversal of the standard ARRSE comment on continuous attitude surveys, namely "Only moaning barstewards will have bothered to complete it, therefore the results are far too downbeat etc etc."

But you have a point. The response rate to ResCAS 2014 turns out to be 13% overall, and only 7% for the Army Reserve. The statisticians have assumed that the missing responses are Missing at Random, i.e. that the perceptions of those who did not reply would, on average, have been the same as those who did.
 
The response rate to ResCAS 2014 turns out to be 13% overall, and only 7% for the Army Reserve. The statisticians have assumed that the missing responses are Missing at Random, i.e. that the perceptions of those who did not reply would, on average, have been the same as those who did.

Having been out for a little while, I wasn't invited to take part in the survey.

How was it conducted? Invitations via JPA?
 
Having been out for a little while, I wasn't invited to take part in the survey.

How was it conducted? Invitations via JPA?
Differed according to service, which might be reflected in the takeup rates. For the Army Reserve:
The Army Reserves survey self completion paper questionnaire was included in the Winter 13/14 edition of the Army Reserve Quarterly (ARQ) magazine. An electronic version of the questionnaire was also hosted on Army Net on the Defence Gateway website. The Chief of General Staff (CGS) briefing team also distributed 600 copies during their visits to units in January 2014. Respondents were able to return the paper questionnaire using a freepost address.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tri-service-reserves-continuous-attitude-survey-2014
 
So they might have got a better response if they'd told each CSM to hand out the questionnaires on a Drill Night and to collect the completed papers at the end of the session.

I don't know about others but I opened my TAQs and ARQs in bulk shortly after I signed off and, other than for the first year of its inception, hardly bothered with ArmyNet.

Perhaps somebody didn't want a large response.
 
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