News from India

Man, 72, 'stoned to death' by group of "rogue" monkeys throwing bricks at him

Some classic lines in this story

Mr Singh's family has lodged a formal complaint and named monkeys as the accused but police insisted they cannot prosecute monkeys and have declared Mr Singh’s death was an accident.
and the heart rending death of

Back in 2007 the deputy mayor of India's capital of Delhi died after being attacked by a horde of wild monkeys. SS Bajwa suffered serious head injuries when he fell from the first-floor terrace of his home on trying to fight them off.
 
1000-2000 ft lbs WRENCHES? I think you will find not many of those unicorns. What size drive would those 1000-2000 ft lbs WRENCHES have? How would one of your diminutive stature even manage to apply 2000 ft lbs of pressure through a wrench that was less than 20 feet long, much less a 2 foot handle?

Perhaps you have mistakenly said wrench, when you mean MULTIPLIER. You know (well probably don't know), those things applied to 1" drive WRENCHES to increase their capability to the 2000 ft lbs range, where you have to know the multiplier range to calculate the actual force applied when setting your actual 600 ft lbs torque wrench (the largest industrial size commonly available) to something much lower (I am doubting you could apply 600 ft lbs of force through a wrench as well). Apparently you don't know the tools you are claiming to use and are also confused about the actual calculations one is meant to apply at such a job. This type of work doesn't require a degree either, it is simply grunt mechanic work for those that finished elementary school mathematics.
Yes i have personally worked on a 1200 ft lbs torque wrench.It was a click type and was 5 feet long.And no you can't apply such a massive torque all by yourself.We required atleast 4 people to do that.
Not many industries have torque wrenches over 600 ft lbs because they use hydraulic wrenches instead.But they are very expensive and industries during their initial set up phase usually do not buy it.

And by the way it's 2000 ft lbs of torque,not pressure.Torque and Pressure are different.Now go back to elementary school.
 
Yes i have personally worked on a 1200 ft lbs torque wrench.It was a click type and was 5 feet long.And no you can't apply such a massive torque all by yourself.We required atleast 4 people to do that.
Not many industries have torque wrenches over 600 ft lbs because they use hydraulic wrenches instead.But they are very expensive and industries during their initial set up phase usually do not buy it.

And by the way it's 2000 ft lbs of torque,not pressure.Torque and Pressure are different.Now go back to elementary school.
Torque would be the rotational/twisting force the wrench applies to the socket which in turns transfers that force to the nut.

Pressure would be the linear force you apply to the wrench to create the torsional force at the pivot. Dumbass.

An "engineer" would know this, as well as be able to say that 2000 ft lbs of pressure is not necessary, as the pressure is applied to the handle, which acts as a lever translating your linear force (pressure) into a rotational force (torque) at the pivot, as well as give the formula for the translation of that linear force into the pseudovector. But you failed, again.
 
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Torque would be the rotational/twisting force the wrench applies to the socket which in turns transfers that force to the nut.

Pressure would be the linear force you apply to the wrench to create the torsional force at the pivot. Dumbass.

An "engineer" would know this, as well as be able to say that 2000 ft lbs of pressure is not necessary, as the pressure is applied to the handle, which acts as a lever translating your linear force (pressure) into a rotational force (torque) at the pivot, as well as give the formula for the translation of that linear force into the pseudovector. But you failed, again.
The above post is a clear display of your lack of knowledge....

"Pressure" and "force" are different and are not interchangable.Pressure has no direction and hence is a scalar quanitity unlike the later which is a vector quantity.

Pressure is a function of area where it acts.

Try your luck harder next time you empty vessel.
 
Which is what he just said you thicky from Thicksville.
He calls pressure a linear force which is completely wrong.

You cannot use pressure in place of force or force in place of torque.

Torque is correlated to "work" and not force or pressure.
 
Pressure is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed.

Torque is a measure of how much a force acting on an object causes that object to rotate.

He calls pressure a linear force which is completely wrong.

You cannot use pressure in place of force or force in place of torque.

Torque is correlated to "work" and not force or pressure.
The bolded would be the operative bit in my sentence "the linear force you apply to the wrench." Are you saying that you applying pressure, or force perpendicular to the handle is not a basically linear motion? Or are you confusing measurements of force applied with actions? Again?

Pressure (force) and Torque (pseudovector work product of force) are both measured in ft lbs (which is Force per Unit Area). But if you were anywhere near professional engineering or science level you'd actually be using Pascals and Newton Metres to differentiate the two, so lessers don't get confused, and you wouldn't be the one looking as silly or confused as you now do.

Catch up wada wallah.
 
But if you were anywhere near professional engineering or science level you'd actually be using Pascals and Newton Metres to differentiate the two, so lessers don't get confused, and you wouldn't be the one looking as silly or confused as you now do.

Catch up wada wallah.
It's because his engineering qualifications were obtained by either buying them off of the internet, giving his Dean of Faculty blowies for grades, or simply by possessing a fertile imagination and talent for telling fibs.


Unlike mine, which were achieved through study at an accredited university offering an accredited course curriculum.
 
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Except that torque is rotational force.
Torque is a force which when applied causes angular displacement but a force applied resulting in a linear displacement is something else,that is why one cannot use force and torque interchangeably.
 
Pressure is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed.

Torque is a measure of how much a force acting on an object causes that object to rotate.



The bolded would be the operative bit in my sentence "the linear force you apply to the wrench." Are you saying that you applying pressure, or force perpendicular to the handle is not a basically linear motion? Or are you confusing measurements of force applied with actions? Again?

Pressure (force) and Torque (pseudovector work product of force) are both measured in ft lbs (which is Force per Unit Area). But if you were anywhere near professional engineering or science level you'd actually be using Pascals and Newton Metres to differentiate the two, so lessers don't get confused, and you wouldn't be the one looking as silly or confused as you now do.

Catch up wada wallah.

Good going with wiki search....You are trying to defend your fallen ego but the sad reality is that each of the terms are not interchangeable with each other even if they are closely related.

Pressure and stress have the same Force per Unit area definition but both are different.
 
It's because his engineering qualifications were obtained by either buying them off of the internet, giving his Dean of Faculty blowies for grades, or simply by possessing a fertile imagination and talent for telling fibs.


Unlike mine, which were achieved through study at an accredited university offering an accredited coarse curriculum.

You speak as if degrees are some kind of passport,it is nothing more than level 1 in a game.It won't guarantee you a job.

In today's world nobody is going to employee you if you do not have the requisite skills.
 
Torque is a force which when applied causes angular displacement but a force applied resulting in a linear displacement is something else,that is why one cannot use force and torque interchangeably.
Some fecker over Torqued my wheel nuts (old landy )

6ft scaffold pole around the 3ft break bar and as much force as the 2 of us could apply to crack the bastards
 
Torque is a force which when applied causes angular displacement but a force applied resulting in a linear displacement is something else,that is why one cannot use force and torque interchangeably.
You just did in your cobbled together sentence which demonstrates you haven't quite got the grasp of the concept of torque.

Again, the force the operator applies to the handle is pressure. The pseudovector work product of that applied force, through the lever and pivot converting that force to a torsional force, is torque. The torque is not the force, but the measure of the force exerted to reach the end state.

Good going with wiki search....You are trying to defend your fallen ego but the sad reality is that each of the terms are not interchangeable with each other even if they are closely related.

Pressure and stress have the same Force per Unit area definition but both are different.
You are the one using them interchangeably. and also failing to recognize the subtle difference between the force you apply, and the resultant angular/torsional/rotational force which produces the incident, desired pseudovector of torque.

BSc...? Bachelor of Sewer Cleaning?
Bachelor of Sewer Cleaning gets you a Lead Wadawallah position, where you may even be able to afford dish gloves.

Torque is a force which when applied causes angular displacement but a force applied resulting in a linear displacement is something else,that is why one cannot use force and torque interchangeably.
Nope.... Torque is the measurement of the force producing the desired endpoint.
Still having trouble, but don't give up. You may achieve something... someday.

Good going with wiki search....You are trying to defend your fallen ego but the sad reality is that each of the terms are not interchangeable with each other even if they are closely related.

Pressure and stress have the same Force per Unit area definition but both are different.
Both are different in the manner I described. Multiple times. In different ways. But you are still having trouble understanding. It's ok. I see your stress has caused you to introduce "Stress" into your argument. It seems you are breaking down and unable to internally resist the outside pressure resultant from your attempts at projection into the modern world. I do hope that you won't let the load cause you strain and further mental deformation.
 

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