New US Army 42 page guide for soldiers acceptable conduct on base.

jim30

LE
I saw this via FB and thought it may be worth posting here - It feels like a similar event is doubtless going to happen to the British Army too. As the campaiging comes to an end, are we going to see similar moves to take the Army back to where it was before the interruption of fighting a war got in the way, or is this merely a sensible step to restore standards post tour?

It feels like it ties into the excellent Army Learning Culture thread elsewhere too - are Armies about fighting or standing to attention at evening sunset ceremonies, and in turn does this help professionalism?

An age old debate rears its head again!


http://gazette.com/fort-carsons-top-nco-clearly-outlines-dos-and-donts-for-soldiers/article/1540241

Cmmand Sgt. Maj. David Clark has a few rules for his Fort Carson soldiers - 42 pages worth.

As the 4th Infantry Division's top enlisted soldier, Clark spearheaded the new rulebook released this month that outlaws walking while smoking and requires soldiers to exit their cars to render honors to the nation at the end of the duty day.


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The new rules lighten requirements for reflective belts but reinforce tough new regulations on tattoos and piercings.

"I tried to lay it out so everyone clearly understands the standards," said Clark, who hit his 30th year in the Army this month.

One of the changes that will have the widest impact concerns smoking. After more than a decade of lax wartime enforcement of regulations on cigarette use, the Army is pushing troops to kick the habit.

That means smokers must put away their packs during training exercises and obey rules that forbid them from walking and smoking on base.

"We want to show them what right looks like," Clark said.

There are moves afoot at the Pentagon that could ban cigarette sales on bases or make bases smoke-free.

Smoking, for now, remains OK in designated areas. In the field, though, soldiers may want to bring some nicotine gum. Smoking will be allowed in the field only in designated areas and on designated breaks from training.

"It's training and it's for training," Clark said.

Clark said part of training for warfare includes learning how to do without creature comforts. And at night, a lit cigarette can draw a sniper's bullet.

"We look at the discipline of our force and we look at noise and light discipline," Clark said.

The standards manual has been in the works for three months, and commanders will have 60 days to bring their soldiers up to speed.

Some of the standards are in full-force now, especially when it comes to military courtesy.

A Fort Carson private started a social media storm this year when she snapped a selfie while hiding in her car from a retreat formation. The formation, which happens at the end of every duty day on Fort Carson, requires soldiers to pause and salute while honors are rendered to the flag.

Fort Carson regulations now require all soldiers to get out of their cars and render honors.

"It's really about getting back to our customs and courtesies," Clark said.

With 13 years of war set to end Dec. 31 when the last combat troops leave Afghanistan, the Army is working to stiffen policies that were allowed to slide while soldiers fought overseas.

"It never went away, but we're getting back to the basics," Clark said,

One change that some soldiers will cheer: The hated reflective belts long worn as a mandatory accessory with physical training uniforms will see less use. Clark said he's allowing low-level commanders to decide whether soldiers need the reflective belts.

"We're creating soldiers and leaders to think," he said. "We want to empower it down to leaders based on the situation."

As the senior enlisted soldier on Fort Carson, Clark serves as the post's head disciplinarian. Bad haircuts, messy uniforms and misconduct downtown all wind up in his office.

He said that all those regulations and policies he enforces are what separates America's Army from its rivals. A disciplined force with stringent standards is one that wins in battle, too, he said.

Soldiers are going to get acquainted with those standards quickly. The rulebook released this month comes as an online document, a pocket-sized book or as a smartphone application.

Sergeants and officers are expected to teach their soldiers the rules and to ensure they are followed.

"We owe our soldiers the best leadership that we can provide," Clark said.

Clark expects all but a handful of soldiers to easily comply with the rules.

"There will be people who will test it, and there is corrective training for that group and I think it's a small group," he said.

For those picturing the maniacal torture a sergeant major could inflict on a scofflaw, Clark says he want soldiers to learn, not suffer.


"It constructive not destructive," he said.

With 13 years of war set to end Dec. 31 when the last combat troops leave Afghanistan, the Army is working to stiffen policies that were allowed to slide while soldiers fought overseas.

"It never went away, but we're getting back to the basics," Clark said,

One change that some soldiers will cheer: The hated reflective belts long worn as a mandatory accessory with physical training uniforms will see less use. Clark said he's allowing low-level commanders to decide whether soldiers need the reflective belts.

"We're creating soldiers and leaders to think," he said. "We want to empower it down to leaders based on the situation."

As the senior enlisted soldier on Fort Carson, Clark serves as the post's head disciplinarian. Bad haircuts, messy uniforms and misconduct downtown all wind up in his office.

He said that all those regulations and policies he enforces are what separates America's Army from its rivals. A disciplined force with stringent standards is one that wins in battle, too, he said.

Soldiers are going to get acquainted with those standards quickly. The rulebook released this month comes as an online document, a pocket-sized book or as a smartphone application.

Sergeants and officers are expected to teach their soldiers the rules and to ensure they are followed.

"We owe our soldiers the best leadership that we can provide," Clark said.

Clark expects all but a handful of soldiers to easily comply with the rules.

"There will be people who will test it, and there is corrective training for that group and I think it's a small group," he said.

For those picturing the maniacal torture a sergeant major could inflict on a scofflaw, Clark says he want soldiers to learn, not suffer.

"It constructive not destructive," he said


soldiers/article/1540241#sWTyqYcO2tGeGRUh.99
 
Thats nothing...

10th Mountain division has a Blue book thats an inspectable item by any NCO & required to be carried at all times in uniform. Its even required for the USAR & ARNG units which come to the base for training, even though they don't have the same equipment. Same for 3ID and most of the 82nd & 101st.
 

ACAB

LE
With all due respect "Cmmand Sgt. Maj. David Clark" comes across as an insufferable prick.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
ACAB I'd give you a "Like" as well but the system won't let me.
 

ACAB

LE
Different army different ethos.............. I fail to see fags verboten in the field though...
Completely agree. It sounds like some form of Californian Control Freakery gone crazy. Any soldier with half a brain understands the dangers of smoking at night, the rest he's suggesting appears to be more utter PC bullshit.
 
Completely agree. It sounds like some form of Californian Control Freakery gone crazy. Any soldier with half a brain understands the dangers of smoking at night, the rest he's suggesting appears to be more utter PC bullshit.
Rolls downhill from the SMA Sergeant Major of the Army Chandler. Another Putz when he became a E-9.

Most of these guys are chosen because they are ********* not field soldiers
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
Sounds fair enough to me. Hands in pockets = slack soldier, SNCO in this case.




Or are they joking?

[Wah/]It's the Duffel Blog. Take a guess [\Wah]
 

ACAB

LE
Sounds fair enough to me. Hands in pockets = slack soldier, SNCO in this case.




Or are they joking?
IT. IS. SATIRICAL.

And often ******* hilarious, mainly for the amount of 'I'm ******* outraged' bites they get in their comments section.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
Rolls downhill from the SMA Sergeant Major of the Army Chandler. Another Putz when he became a E-9.

Most of these guys are chosen because they are ********* not field soldiers

I see Chandler has the CAB, but that his Bronze Star is without the V Device. In fairness, I suppose the job requires effective management experience above all else and if that's his thing ...
 
Standing to attention, and saluting when the colours were raised or lowered was normal during my time in the RCAF, if you were in your car, you got out and saluted. Smoking while walking from one place to the next, I'm not sure of, but I can't recall doing it, and I was a 40 a day man back then.
 

Crazy_Chester

Old-Salt
Good to see the yanks following the "too hot - too cold" model much beloved by the British Army and Police.
 
I see Chandler has the CAB, but that his Bronze Star is without the V Device. In fairness, I suppose the job requires effective management experience above all else and if that's his thing ...
Pretty much all Army senior NCO (SFC & ABove were awarded a BSM(Meritorious not Valor) as end of Iraq tour awards instead of Meritorious Service Medals (MSM). Some got them without even ONCE going outside the wire. IF you see a Lower enlisted Pvt-SSG with a BSM, they likely have done something fairly valorous. I once listened in disgust as 2 Lieutenants argued with our commander about why they had to turn in their interim MSM's for a BSM. The officers thought they should be able to keep both awards.

Frankly I dont trust any fruit salad on a Officer or NCO unless there's a CIB and a V device ARCOM or BSM, Purple Heart medal to go with it.
 

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