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New (to me) authors, any opinions please?

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Evening Bibliophiles :cool:

Every now and then I get recommendations, from various sources, of authors I've not been aware of - the most recent being Andy Maslen and James Lee Burke.

Anyone read these authors, and are they recommended?

Cheers in advance.
 

philc

LE
I enjoyed early Dave Robicheaux by James Lee Burke but he took the storyline to far, Time, age and the storytelling got beyond fiction into unbelievable.
 
James Lee Burke’s early Robicheaux novels are excellent: New Orleans neo-noir type stuff, ex-Army ex-alcoholic cop, product of screwed up childhood etc.

But as philc says, the trouble is, they start to get a bit silly as the series goes on. Probably best to read in order, so you can "jump ship" once you find it all starts to get a bit too much.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
James Lee Burke’s early Robicheaux novels are excellent: New Orleans neo-noir type stuff, ex-Army ex-alcoholic cop, product of screwed up childhood etc.

But as philc says, the trouble is, they start to get a bit silly as the series goes on. Probably best to read in order, so you can "jump ship" once you find it all starts to get a bit too much.


How do they compare (if at all) to the Reacher novels in terms of unbelievableness?

I've read maybe four or five Reachers, which were ok if one suspended disbelief (e.g. Reacher takes out four baddies with one hand tied behind his back). I found them reasonably enjoyable but not enough to want to read any more.

I've just ordered The Dirty South by John Connolly (who I thoroughly enjoy), and Amazon recommended the Robicheaux series. (Of course, you have to suspend disbelief in the supernatural if you're going to read the Charlie Parker series, but Connolly is such an excellent writer that it hardly matters.)
 

philc

LE
I've read maybe four or five Reachers, which were ok if one suspended disbelief (e.g. Reacher takes out four baddies with one hand tied behind his back). I found them reasonably enjoyable but not enough to want to read any more.

Not read any Reacher, Robicheaux is doing stuff like that in what would be his late 70s, hence it got silly.
 
Well, with the proviso that I've only read two or three of the Reachers, I think I would say that the early Robicheaux ones are a lot more believable and realistic than the Reachers. I seem to recall that Robicheaux gets the living daylights kicked out of him a lot more. (Although of course he usually then crawls home/into the office, licks his wounds, gets it together a little, works out what's been going on and then deals out justice.)

In the literary stakes, personally I'd rate James Lee Burke as a better writer than Lee Child, just in terms of how sometimes the descriptions he writes invoke the picture in your mind, ditto for his dialogue. Whereas I sometimes got the feeling with Lee Child that he was working to a deadline of a book a year. (Which I then found out was true: apparently he has a set few months or something which are his writing "season", and basically the book gets written during that time, come hell or high-water.)

From what I remember about Robicheaux, no supernatural stuff. But sometimes a kind of existential lyricism about the south.

At the start of the series he's almost 50 or something (perhaps even already older than that, he's a Vietnam vet) so as philc says, as the series goes on, he's old, and then it does become unbelievable.
 

jmb3296

War Hero
There are a couple of James Lee Burke early Robicheaux novels in talking books, narrated in a very evocative Deep South accent which adds quite considerably to them as I recall.
 

Chef

LE
I like the Robicheaux books they trundle along and I worked out his age and he's getting a bit long in the tooth in theory but they are fiction books. Consider Biggles going through WWI as a fighter pilot, still flying Spitfires for WWII and then cracking on as a flying policeman post war, with colonel Raymond in tow.

Or Just William.
 
I like the Robicheaux books they trundle along and I worked out his age and he's getting a bit long in the tooth in theory but they are fiction books. Consider Biggles going through WWI as a fighter pilot, still flying Spitfires for WWII and then cracking on as a flying policeman post war, with colonel Raymond in tow.

Or Just William.

Authors can dig themselves a hole with a characters back story.

An American mystery author that I like, Archer Mayor, has written a series of books featuring a police detective in Vermont (a rural state) named Joe Gunther. The books are well written and I enjoy them but the author is up to 31 books over many years. The problem is that he first presented Joe Gunther as a veteran of the Korean War. Any surviving veterans of Korea are now in their 80's or more. He then made Joe Gunther a Vietnam veteran. Oops! Vietnam veterans are now in their 70s and 80s and the youngest Vietnam vets are possibly in their late 60's. All way too old to be serving as a police officer currently.
 
Household Cavalry Historian Christopher Joll has just written the Spoils of War about the treasures acquired during 700 years of British campaigning around the world, including Joan of Arc's ring, the Rock of Gibraltar and Hitler's desk.

Hear Joll discussing Spoils of War -

 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Currently reading Caimh McDonnell, who is very funny.

Andrew Raymond has done a series of good page-turners.

Other recent reads/discoveries:

Robert Olen Butler

Jim McDermott's Otto Fischer series
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Try the Sean Duffy series by Adrian Mckinty. Set in 1980'S N.I.
First one is "THE COLD COLD GROUND".
Enjoyed them all.

Yes I think I read the first one but found it a bit underwhelming. Perhaps, like a lot of authors, the subsequent books get better.
 

jmb3296

War Hero
Currently reading Caimh McDonnell, who is very funny.

Andrew Raymond has done a series of good page-turners.

Other recent reads/discoveries:

Robert Olen Butler

Jim McDermott's Otto Fischer series

I have never read McDonnell. Any suggestions as to which would be a good one to start with.

Thanks
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I see the thread's had a bit of a clean-up. Many thanks mods.
 
Andy Weir - The Martian. Even better than the film and the science is pretty spot on (I recall one mistake, but can’t remember what it was).

Christopher Brookmyre - a series of dark, satirical crime books mostly centred around a journalist.
As a starter try “ all fun and games until somebody loses an eye”, a stand-alone which is brilliant - some mistakes but I can suspend disbelief due to smiles.

He has also done a few sci-fi which are pretty good.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I have never read McDonnell. Any suggestions as to which would be a good one to start with.

Thanks
They run in order. There's a Dublin trilogy (actually, it's four books as there's a prequel). Start there, then progress to the ones set in the US. There's a natural order and getting them out of synch will spoil your enjoyment and understanding.

So:

A man with one of those faces
The day that never comes
Angels in the moonlight
Last orders

Then

Disaster, Inc.
I have sinned
 

jmb3296

War Hero
They run in order. There's a Dublin trilogy (actually, it's four books as there's a prequel). Start there, then progress to the ones set in the US. There's a natural order and getting them out of synch will spoil your enjoyment and understanding.

So:

A man with one of those faces
The day that never comes
Angels in the moonlight
Last orders

Then

Disaster, Inc.
I have sinned

Thank you.
I have downloaded it on kindle. I even got it free on kindle unlimited, the full trilogy appears to be on kindle unlimited just now so great value and a risk free purchase even if I don’t like it.
Thank you for the recommendation.
 

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