New Threats, New Weapons

Yokel

LE
Martlet is on the way!

Thales on track to provide Royal Navy with increased capability | Thales Group

Thales recently conducted firing trials at Royal Artillery Air Defence Range at Manorbier as part of the Integration testing phase of the Future Anti Surface Guided Weapon (Light), (FASGW(L) programme. The FASGW(L) programme includes testing of all parts of the weapon system including the Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM), the launcher system and all key equipment of the Wildcat helicopter.

The LMM, which the Royal Navy will call Martlet when it enters service in 2020, will provide an enhanced level of protection for both service personnel in the Royal Navy and vital assets at sea, such as the Queen Elizabeth Carrier.

The trials consisted of 6 LMMs being fired from the Thales designed Launcher system at a small boat target at sea at a distance of 4.5kms. All missiles were test rounds with no warhead, but were fitted with telemetry software enabling data to be gathered to analyse the launcher, the guidance system and missile performance.




Will Wildcat be able to carry a mixed weapon load of Martlet, Sea Venom, and Stingray?

The radar and EO systems also contribute significantly to dealing with the small craft threat, as does the 0.5 Cal Heavy Machine. I first saw the HMG (with a belt of ammunition) aboard the flight deck of HMS Glasgow in 2004. I understand that it was hurriedly procured for Operation Telic in 2003, and Merlin HM1s operating from RFA Fort Victoria provided an ISTAR capability.
 

Yokel

LE
Now where is my consultancy fee? Has it got lost in the post again?

Navy’s new anti-ship missile bang on target | Royal Navy

HMS Sutherland fired four new Martlet missiles at a fast-moving speedboat off the Welsh coast to see whether the weapon could be launched from a ship as well as a helicopter.

Martlet – also known as the Lightweight Multi-role Missile – was originally designed to be fired by Wildcat helicopters to take out small boats which posed a threat to the Fleet, alongside the heavier Sea Venom for dealing with larger warships.

But recent incidents where both merchant and military shipping have been attacked by manned and unmanned surface and air systems armed with explosive devices, underlined the risks faced by Royal Navy units deployed in danger zones.

I presume that in time, all DS30M Mk2 fitted ships, including the carriers, will follow? Not sure about MCMVs, Hydrographic vessels, or RFAs though.
 
Now where is my consultancy fee? Has it got lost in the post again?

Navy’s new anti-ship missile bang on target | Royal Navy

HMS Sutherland fired four new Martlet missiles at a fast-moving speedboat off the Welsh coast to see whether the weapon could be launched from a ship as well as a helicopter.

Martlet – also known as the Lightweight Multi-role Missile – was originally designed to be fired by Wildcat helicopters to take out small boats which posed a threat to the Fleet, alongside the heavier Sea Venom for dealing with larger warships.

But recent incidents where both merchant and military shipping have been attacked by manned and unmanned surface and air systems armed with explosive devices, underlined the risks faced by Royal Navy units deployed in danger zones.

I presume that in time, all DS30M Mk2 fitted ships, including the carriers, will follow? Not sure about MCMVs, Hydrographic vessels, or RFAs though.
Only RFA Ship that had ASCG was Wave Ruler and shes been Laid up for a few years.
 

Yokel

LE
Only RFA Ship that had ASCG was Wave Ruler and shes been Laid up for a few years.
If deployed RFAs normally carry Phalanx, then why not ASCG? After all they are important elements of any task group, and the more self defence they have means the less support they need from the carrier, frigates, and destroyers.

Since it is all about publicity - neither the enemy or the public will care whether the grey British ship they have attacked is HMS XYZ and flying the White Ensign or RFA ZYX and flying the Blue Ensign.
 
If deployed RFAs normally carry Phalanx, then why not ASCG?...
I’d imagine that there’s a bit of a difference between sticking Phalanx and what is probably classed as a ‘complex weapon’ on an RFA.

Regards,
MM
 

Yokel

LE
I’d imagine that there’s a bit of a difference between sticking Phalanx and what is probably classed as a ‘complex weapon’ on an RFA.

Regards,
MM
Phalanx is not exactly simple with two radars, control systems, and now with the 1B version an IR tracker and the facility manual control. It requires RN Weapon Engineers to look after it. Ironically perhaps, said Weapon Engineers come from 1700 NAS at Culdrose.

1700 Naval Air Squadron | Royal Navy
 
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Phalanx is not exactly simple with two radars, IFF, control systems, and now with the 1B version an IR tracker and the facility manual control. It requires RN Weapon Engineers to look after it. Ironically perhaps, said Weapon Engineers come from 1700 NAS at Culdrose.

1700 Naval Air Squadron | Royal Navy
I know (although I didn’t think it had integral IFF).

But the term ‘complex weapons’ (CW) is applied to a wide variety of systems which could essentially be described as guided missiles. There is an MoD umbrella policy for the development and fielding of CW.

Regards,
MM
 
I've an idea that will increase gunnery proficiency. More time and live rounds dedicated for training!

These days everyone just does the bare minimum training to keep people OPS and rushes them through to do it....
That will never catch on!

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

Yokel

LE
I know (although I didn’t think it had integral IFF).

But the term ‘complex weapons’ (CW) is applied to a wide variety of systems which could essentially be described as guided missiles. There is an MoD umbrella policy for the development and fielding of CW.

Regards,
MM
Actually I am not so sure about the IFF. Ironic in a way, as it was designed primarily to be a last line of defence for carriers. If it flies - it does? @jrwlynch

I still think a remotely controlled 30mm gun, must be simpler, even with the thermal imager, laser rangefinder and image intensifier (and normal TV) system and tracking computer.
 
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jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
Actually I am not so sure about the IFF. Ironic in a way, as it was designed primarily to be a last line of defence for carriers. If it flies - ir does? @jrwlynch

I still think a remotely controlled 30mm gun, must be simpler, even with the thermal imager, laser rangefinder and imagine intensifier (and normal TV) system and tracking computer.
No IFF on Phalanx.

ASCG is cheaper, simpler to maintain, but more complex to use - unless you're using the Block 1B's backup modes, Phalanx is "set parameters for threat, as agreed when you did your ASMD tabletopping" and then when told to do so (either from own ship or someone else, for an RFA with disadvantaged sensors) I vaguely remember the highly complex sequence of pressing "BREAK ENGAGE", "AAW1 AUTO" and then "FIRE" on the panel...
 

Mr._Average

Old-Salt
Not sure where to put this as there has been a fair bit of chat about suitable gun calibres / capabilities for various ship types, but here seemed as good a place as any.

Raytheon are billing it as the next generation ASCM, presumably to fit into an ASCG (assuming small calibre includes 57mm).


Under development since 2015, it's aimed at providing 'anti-ship missile self defence for LCS & FFG' and it apparently will 'combine the speed, rapid fire and depth of a gun weapon system with the precision and accuracy of guided missiles...'

The thing I found interesting about this particular bit of development was its use of a 57mm gun. Not to mention, anything called "MAD-FIRES" is bound to attract a bit of attention....

A bit more info here, too.

Video: DARPA MAD-FIRES Anti-Ship Missile Self Defense for LCS & FFG(X) - Naval News
 
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Yokel

LE
Martlet is on the way!

Thales on track to provide Royal Navy with increased capability | Thales Group

Thales recently conducted firing trials at Royal Artillery Air Defence Range at Manorbier as part of the Integration testing phase of the Future Anti Surface Guided Weapon (Light), (FASGW(L) programme. The FASGW(L) programme includes testing of all parts of the weapon system including the Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM), the launcher system and all key equipment of the Wildcat helicopter.

The LMM, which the Royal Navy will call Martlet when it enters service in 2020, will provide an enhanced level of protection for both service personnel in the Royal Navy and vital assets at sea, such as the Queen Elizabeth Carrier.

The trials consisted of 6 LMMs being fired from the Thales designed Launcher system at a small boat target at sea at a distance of 4.5kms. All missiles were test rounds with no warhead, but were fitted with telemetry software enabling data to be gathered to analyse the launcher, the guidance system and missile performance.




Will Wildcat be able to carry a mixed weapon load of Martlet, Sea Venom, and Stingray?

The radar and EO systems also contribute significantly to dealing with the small craft threat, as does the 0.5 Cal Heavy Machine. I first saw the HMG (with a belt of ammunition) aboard the flight deck of HMS Glasgow in 2004. I understand that it was hurriedly procured for Operation Telic in 2003, and Merlin HM1s operating from RFA Fort Victoria provided an ISTAR capability.
The Wildcat weapon wings are currently being flight tested by Leonardo - according to this.

Each wing can accommodate either 10 Martlet or two Sea Venom missiles. The design also provides additional lift for the helicopter in forward flight, taking some effort from the main rotor.

However I believe Sting Ray is carried to the fuselage - see Sting Ray away.

Perhaps a mixed ASW/SWuW weapon load is possible?
 

Yokel

LE
Perhaps it is noteworthy that the first serial of the current Exercise Joint Warrior was an anti FIAC exercise last night, pretty much at the start of the exercise.




Small boats threats are a feature of every Joint Warrior I have attended, but it has never been discussed in public like this.
 

Yokel

LE
The SWARMEX is reported on the RN website as well: Ships thwart mass attack....

The Fighting Clan launched her Merlin Mk2 helicopter, call sign Highlander, to watch over the duo as they slowly made their way down the Clyde estuary (Hurworth’s top speed is 17 knots – 20mph).

The eyes in the sky of the Merlin – from 814 Naval Air Squadron, based at Culdrose in Cornwall –provided timely warning of the impending ‘swarmex’ (swarm exercise), as speedboats emerged from a small inlet, intent on causing havoc.

Warning messages were broadcast over the radio, but when these were ignored, the onus fell on the ship’s protection teams on both ships to fend off the swarms using machine-guns and Mini-guns (hand-held Gatling guns), with Sutherland also able to weigh in with her 30mm automatic cannon. And Highlander added to the hail of steel raining down on the fast inshore attack craft with her aircrewman manning a 50 calibre machine-gun picking off the enemy from on high.

“We really dialled up the complexity of this ‘beat-’em-up’ exercise – multiple fast-attack craft, the close proximity of land, our helicopter providing machine-gun support and a minehunter for us to protect – this is realistic and highly-valuable training,” said Lieutenant Commander Tom Knott, Sutherland’s Second-in-Command.

“It isn’t as simple as bringing guns to bear, however. We must consider Rules of Engagement and the implications of opening fire versus the escalation of diplomatic tensions. It’s tense but this is what the Fighting Clan thrives on.”
 

Yokel

LE
Martlet is still coming soon - very soon.


Why refer to the Wildcat as the AW159?

Will Wildcat be able to carry a mixed load of Martlet and Sea Venom for larger targets, or a mixed weapon load including a Stingray torpedo? The thing with Martlet is the number of missiles - a salvo of them should break up an attacking swarm.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The thing with Martlet is the number of missiles - a salvo of them should break up an attacking swarm.
Always assuming your heli is aloft at the right time
 

Yokel

LE
Always assuming your heli is aloft at the right time
Helo! Not 'heli'. When did that come into popular use?

The assumption is that a warship or task group will maintain situational awareness of what is going on as well as an intelligence picture. An armed helicopter can be launched at short notice.

I hope that the ship launched version is fitted to as much of the fleet as possible.
 

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