New Orleans ordered to be evacuated.

#2
Agreed. I wish them all good luck. Could you imagine if the UK govt was to order Liverpool emptied because of a storm!
 
#5
Hmmm.. oil prices to be driven higher?

I do, however, mean what I said earlier: I know there is a fair bit of banter between us and the Spams, but I genuinely wish all of you in affected areas the best, especially those that are serving over seas and have family in the threatened areas.
 
#7
If projections hold this could be the worst death toll and destruction in sometime. New Orleans is 12 feet below sea level and the levees can only withstand a storm surge of 18 feet, the storm surge is expected to be 20-30 feet...sounds like Mardi Gras is canceled for next year. Not to mention that the standing water for days after will be filled with cr@p, chemicals and be prime mosquito breeding ground.

Wish them the best but fear the worst.
 
#10
ctauch said:
Not to mention that the standing water for days after will be filled with cr@p, chemicals and be prime mosquito breeding ground.
Not forgetting all those bodies that get flushed out fromt he above ground cemetries. Having stood on the levee near the bridge waiting for the ferry it was weird looking from the level of water in the river to the level of the ground below. I can't help thinking that it is going to take a whole lot of extra pumping to get the level back down has anyone heard of an estimate yet?
 
#11
The survey's are underway as well as a massive search/rescue op to recover folks stranded by the flood waters. The death toll will go much higher. Two levies are breeched in NO and the pumps just arent working.
 
#12
and thanks to the international community for lending aid and assistance in the aftermath of all the storms...oh correction there is no international assistance, just hoards of foreign reports snapping pictures and gawking.
 
#14
I hope that casualties and damage are minimal and I am sure the US emergency services are doing their best in the face of these adverserial conditons. The US do have a reputation for pulling together and helping each other out in the aftermath of such disasters.
 
#15
as tomahawk noted this is going to get much worse. There are reports from emergency services in New Orleans and surrounding areas that they are not dealing with the dead bodies as of yet. Instead the dead are being left in place in a effort to provide much needed help to those still alive. There are reports that the storm surge affected areas 40 miles inland from the coast, New Orleans is not accessible by land making evacuation of the 10,000 plus currently housed in "shelters" problematic. There is no potable water in many cities, and no electricity for much of Louisianne, Mississippi, and Alabama. Getting aid into the areas is proving difficult due to debris blocking the roads and roads and bridges damaged or just "gone". Even air lifting supplies in to areas like New Orleans is not possible since the airport is under water.

The area affected is so large it is uncomprehensible. Having seen the aftermath of Charlie last year, which was a category 5 but a third of the overall size of Katrina I am stunned by how wide spread the destruction really is from this one. Charlie left a 20 - 30 mile wide swath across the state of Florida while Katrina has left 200+ mile wide devastation and hundreds of miles inland. The true human toll may not be tallied for days, and I fear that we are looking at hundreds if not over a thousand in the New Orleans area alone.

Usually after such an event is starts to get better the following day; in New Orleans it is just getting worse. The city is continuing to be inundated with flooding due to several levee breaks and no power to run the pumps. The city will take years to recover from this one, and the sad thing is the hurricane season is has 3 more months remaining.
 
#16
Everyone was told to evacuate, many chose to ignore the order and fall into 2 categories - dead and refugee's needing relief. While its bad in neighboring states New Orleans and the environs around it are accessible by helicopter. Thousands of people will have to be relocated, but where do they go ? The levee breaches have to be closed before they can begin to pump the water out of New Orleans but the Corps of Engineer's dont have an immediate solution. My guess it will take a minimum of 6 months to make real progress. Damage estimates in the region is $25 billion. This is already affecting the supply of diesel and gasoline with supplies shrinking and prices going up. Many parts of the country are seeing gas stations having their supplies cut off by the suppliers. I think we will see $4 a gallon quite soon and eventually $5 a gallon. So start buying oil/gas futures [I did that 4 months ago].
 
#17
The Mississippi coast is gone, just wiped flat, for many miles inland. There's no infrastructure left to deal with it. FEMA has 500 trucks of water on the way, but they can't get through due to blocked roads. This is bad.
 
#18
Seems to be going from bad to worse. Not unlike the Tsunami in the Indian ocean Dec 2004 (although very different circumstances) the death toll will only be truely tallied many weeks after the initial event. People in the NO area are wading (no pun intended) into the Superdome "shelter"; reports have said "thousands" today; begs to question how many did not make it!

This was a big storm in a densly populated area with many living at or below poverty (poverty in the US sense not the 3rd world sense but none the less "poor"), not to mention the fact that it hit the busiest harbors in the US and refining plants.

Something on this scale has not been seen in the US, not even 9/11 can compare; this is affecting 4 States and millions of people, if not the country. THIS IS HUGE!

NO will not be able to start reconstruction for the next 4-6 months and then we are talking years before it is viable again. Port Charlotte, FL is still trying to rebuild after hurricane Charlie and that was last year and no secondary flooding from levee breaks, there are still hundreds of families living in "temporary" FEMA shelters in that area.
 
#19
Consider NO to be scratched off the map. Fuel in my area is now $3.25-$3.50, and going up. The police in NO are siphoning gas to put in their patrol cars. Police in one precinct had their cars flooded out, and engaged in a gun battle with thugs to comandeer cars from a dealership. Bodies floating in the streets...homeless people in the thousands walking through polluted water looking for dry land. 95 degree temperatures and no water. A whole section of 200+ year old buildings gone.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#20
YANK60 said:
Consider NO to be scratched off the map. Fuel in my area is now $3.25-$3.50, and going up. The police in NO are siphoning gas to put in their patrol cars. Police in one precinct had their cars flooded out, and engaged in a gun battle with thugs to comandeer cars from a dealership. Bodies floating in the streets...homeless people in the thousands walking through polluted water looking for dry land. 95 degree temperatures and no water. A whole section of 200+ year old buildings gone.
What a terrible, terrible thing. I've visted New Orleans several times and it's a city I really like: hard to believe it can be wiped out like this.

My sympathies to everyone affected.
 

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