New? Officer selection question.

Discussion in 'Officers' started by anon_officer_cadet, Sep 12, 2005.

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  1. I'm well aware of the contempt some users feel about the officers forum being used to ask questions about officer selection, however I need some advice. I have observed the board s for months and can't find the help I need. I appreciate the value of the forum and have contributed what I can currently afford to help maintain it. I hope therefore that members will read this post and answer what I believe is quite a difficult question.

    I've sat the RCB once and was told to try again in 12 months (12 months ago).

    My failure was because of the psychometric assessment.

    I believe my EQ is low because both my parents have psychological problems. The cause of this seems to be their time serving. (Royal Signals 77-86 and Royal Military Police 78 -81).

    What happens if I get professional psychological help too?

    The RCB medical was pretty horrific, and applicants seemed to fail for the most ridiculous reasons. I’m quite concerned about the following;
    A: The army will fail me on medical grounds for having received professional help,
    B: I’ll be discharged from Sandhurst if anyone finds out,
    C: A soldiers perception of an officer who’s had professional help will prove to be a problem after Sandhurst.

    If anyone has any personal experience they can share about this please PM me. I know the easy solution is to keep it a secret but these things have a habit of being found out.
     
  2. The army will not fail you for having recieved professional help - they will look into your medical records, and make a decision based on that, they may ask to get a doctor to write an assessment of what your medical situation to be, and there is a 'medical board' that looks into such things etc etc.

    Just bear in mind, that honesty is almost always the best option.

    Good luck
     
  3. a_o_c - not contempt, just puzzled (and not just about your mastery of size and italic coding for a first post):

    Your post is VERY specific about your own circumstances, not sure how it can be answered with pms from people with problems of their own no matter how similar you or they may think they are. I'm also a bit confused as to what you are asking, if you had failed the medical you would not have had a 12 month deferral, you would have had a fail.

    The easy solution is definitely not to keep anything a secret. The whole point of RCB is to filter out people who - for whatever reason - would be extremely unlikely to make the grade as an Officer. If that was me I would want to find out before I made any life-altering choices.

    My recommendation would be to discuss it with your Sponsor.

    Of course, if you are a lawyer acting on behalf of someone who has failed and wants to prove to the World that it really wasn't his fault and get some compen into the bargain...
     
  4. EQ can be developed, but it would seem from your post that the assessment was fair.

    You say "I believe my EQ is low because both my parents have psychological problems. The cause of this seems to be their time serving. (Royal Signals 77-86 and Royal Military Police 78 -81)."

    Thnink in terms of "My EQ is low because I need to mature and develop emotionally".

    You are concerned that

    "A: The army will fail me on medical grounds for having received professional help"

    You should be concerned that "The army will fail me on the same terms if I fail to mature and develop emotionally"

    that
    "I’ll be discharged from Sandhurst if anyone finds out"

    rather than "my efforts at self development will be percieved at Sandhurst as evidence of emotional development only if I take responsibility for my development"

    and
    "A soldiers perception of an officer who’s had professional help will prove to be a problem after Sandhurst."

    As against "A emotionally developed officer who takes responsibility for his own actions, his own failings, and works to overcome them will be respected by his soldiers.

    In short. You need to think positively and you must take responsibility for how you are and for changing it. Looking to apportion blame on the Army, your parents, soldiers, Sandhurst, etc are all signs that you are not taking responsibility for your own development. This isn't about other people or what happened in the past, it is about you and what happens in the future.

    Get help, but recognise that only you can change things. The Army clearly think that you can which is why they have suggested that you try again in 12 months. It is up to you how you change and what aids and assistance you use.
     
  5. The RCB has been a magnificent filter for the officer corps for many years. If you pass RCB you will probably go on to pass RMAS. RowCO was the alternative for those who were not quite up to standard and RowCO has itself produced some outstanding officers - an MC recipient in Gulf 2 for example. The point of RCB is that you must be yourself. You cannot approach it like some examination - you either have what it takes or you have not. So just go back and be yourself and if you fail then be man enough to accept the decision and get on with your life elsewhere. If you pass then get on with RMAS. Stop looking backwards and never ever feel sorry for yourself. If you want to lead then start by looking at yourself and remember the words of Shalton, "Do something. Either lead, follow or get out of the way!"
     
  6. Amazingly, abacus, UBB Code isn't unique to ARRSE.

    And anon_officer_cadet, the medical board includes at least one civilian GP - the others are often TA, too - so the fact that you may have received psychiatric treatment in the past should be given no more weight than the fact that you might have had physiotherapy on a torn hamstring (I got quizzed about this element of my medical past): it illustrates a potential weakness that needs to be clear on your notes but which won't exclude you from entering officer training.

    Neither A nor B will happen. And C will only happen if your medical documents aren't handled with the confidentiality they deserve, or if you choose to tell someone. That said, there is an increasing number of soldiers and officers who have received psychiatric treatment in service and the stigma of such treatment - even amongst the non-medical trades - is declining. They find it much funnier if you'd had syphillis!

    IF