New Navy Uniform

In other words, chinless wonders.

Thanks for the clarification.
Who are personally responsible for the safety of the ship and her people, with no supervision, 24/7.
 

Stan_Deesey

Old-Salt
Not forgetting the mandatory 'oggie' at standeasy and 'night flyers' from the A.C.R.B

That was only when alongside in Guz, but yeah, in those days an oggie and a pint of milk at morning stand easy was the breakfast of champions, and a hangover cure for many a suffering matelot. That was dependent on the NAAFI canman ordering enough pasties though. I remember fights almost breaking out on the occasions the canman ran out, and folks at the back of the queue had to go without their morning oggie.

I have no idea what ´Night flyers´ from the A.C.R.B. were, but I was never a WAFU :D :D
 

bob231

War Hero
Who are personally responsible for the safety of the ship and her people, with no supervision, 24/7.
This is entirely true and routinely with broken sleep patterns.

I would still love to see some take more interest in the machinery and how the Ship they are entrusted to keep safe actually works, mind.

(For the non-RN: officers of the watch are junior warfare officers, the branch that eventually commands fights Ships as PWOs and commands them - or task groups - as senior officers. Some are excellent; some very much are not)
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Who are the, "Bridge Gods"?

Warfare officers.

In the RN you get officers of various flavours. Warfare officers being the most prevalent and the ones who drive the ship.

As the biggest chunk of the officer Corps by far they also have the lowest entry standards.

Many are failed pilots, logistics officers or engineers who took their second option of general duties warfare officer. They’re also the only officers who watch keep as a general rule. This means most of them are sleep starved and miserable all the time. They also manage the warfare ratings, who like their officer counterparts, are the biggest chunk of a ship’s company with the lowest entry standards.

A warfare officer’s time is mostly taken up staring out of a bridge window in the middle of the night or trying to line manage complete retards who have to be reminded to breathe

Engineering officers fall into two categories; 1) ex artificers and ratings who are generally sound. These make up around 40-50% of engineering officers. 2) very strange engineering graduate types with poor social skills.

You also have logistics officers who are basically just in charge of the chefs but for some reason have a massive amount of clout onboard. By all accounts it’s one of the hardest and most competitive branches to get into as an officer.
 
Warfare officers.

In the RN you get officers of various flavours. Warfare officers being the most prevalent and the ones who drive the ship.

My observations over a fair amount of time in the tri-Service environment, exercises & ops.

Charming & effusive to externals, but possessed of an internal getting-on-by-trampling-the-competition culture that makes the Totenkopf look like a children's playgroup. Never have I seen such a culture of backbiting, acidic vicious invective and "eating one's young". RA officers are but amateurs in comparison to RN Warfare Officers (previously known as GL (General List) officers).

They pride themselves on a persona of toxic nastiness; this does not translate across to success in the tri-Service sphere, given as they have fielded one CDS (Adml Boyce) since 1989. Yup, one CDS in 32 years.

I've also had the displeasure of working alongside an SO1 who was a Warfare Officer, sub-specialised as a pilot (Mk 3 Lynxes, if I recall correctly). An utter w***r with nary a good word to say about anything or anyone other than the seniors within the RN. His opinions of the ratings on his last ship (whom he charmingly referred to as 'serfs' or 'Baldricks') I will not list, suffice to say if that were someone in my Service I'd book an appointment with the Stn Cdr and dob the tw@t in.

ETA: Add in almost cringeworthy hero-worship of all things Lympstone, and a waffling tendency to describe everything, but everything, as 'operational'. Going on a fishery OPV - operational. Running an URNU - operational. Teaching at Collingwood - operational. "Guns-Corro" on an MCMV - operational. I have always gone by the assumption that if anyone feels the need to get in your face and tell you how good, or operational they are, then they're probably not really all that..............

That entire branch are not an impressive entity, if I am honest.
 
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bob231

War Hero
My observations over a fair amount of time in the tri-Service environment, exercises & ops.

Charming & effusive to externals, but possessed of an internal getting-on-by-trampling-the-competition culture that makes the Totenkopf look like a children's playgroup. Never have I seen such a culture of backbiting, acidic vicious invective and "eating one's young". RA officers, from my observation, come close but are amateurs in comparison to RN Warfare Officers (previously known as GL (General List) officers).

It's almost like they pride themselves on a persona of toxic nastiness; this does not translate across to success in the tri-Service sphere, given as they have fielded one CDS (Adml Boyce) since 1989. Yup, one CDS in 32 years.
My experience (from within, and @alfred_the_great can correct me) is that flaws in our training system encourage this attitude. The "eat your young" is almost trained in.
 

philc

LE
That was only when alongside in Guz, but yeah, in those days an oggie and a pint of milk at morning stand easy was the breakfast of champions, and a hangover cure for many a suffering matelot. That was dependent on the NAAFI canman ordering enough pasties though. I remember fights almost breaking out on the occasions the canman ran out, and folks at the back of the queue had to go without their morning oggie.

I have no idea what ´Night flyers´ from the A.C.R.B. were, but I was never a WAFU :D :D

Oggie & Banana flavoured pint was indeed the breakfast of choice in Guz.
 
My experience (from within, and @alfred_the_great can correct me) is that flaws in our training system encourage this attitude. The "eat your young" is almost trained in.
As someone who was once one of those, I can concur.
Being back termed at BRNC, I was once in Pompey with fellow OCs during my initial fleet time. In a pub bumped into some of those of my original intake who had commissioned (on time) and were undertaking Phase 2 training.
The difference in their general demeanour, the way they spoke to each other, cynicism etc was really quite stark, especially considering I had seen most of them only a few months prior. From my own time in the job, family and friends were quite blunt in saying I had become a bit of an arrse.
Thank said, I was lucky to have some excellent COs and XOs, the latter role normally being associated with being a kn*b.
 

Yarra

War Hero
My experience (from within, and @alfred_the_great can correct me) is that flaws in our training system encourage this attitude. The "eat your young" is almost trained in.
CS.jpg

So, this was a training film after all?
 
That was only when alongside in Guz, but yeah, in those days an oggie and a pint of milk at morning stand easy was the breakfast of champions, and a hangover cure for many a suffering matelot. That was dependent on the NAAFI canman ordering enough pasties though. I remember fights almost breaking out on the occasions the canman ran out, and folks at the back of the queue had to go without their morning oggie.

I have no idea what ´Night flyers´ from the A.C.R.B. were, but I was never a WAFU :D :D
Who was it that supplied the oggies to the ships, was it Ron or Ivor Dewdney?
 

TamH70

MIA
No wonder the Navy is getting rid of it. Ease of access etc.

All the nice boys love a sailor, all the nice boys love a tar.

For there's something about a sailor, well you know what sailors are.
 
Bright and breezy,
Free and easy . . .
Whereas,


There's something about a Soldier!
Something about about a Soldier! Something about about a Soldier!
That is fine, fine, fine!

He may be a great big general. May be a sergeant major.
May be a simple private of the line, line, line!
There's something about his bearing,
Something in what he's wearing.
Something about his buttons all the shine, shine, shine!

Oh a military chest seems to suit a lady's best!
There's something about a Soldier that is fine, fine, fine!
Join the Army don't be a sissy!
Step right up and get a kissy!

Don’t be shy, boys, We Need a Million !
Home by Christmas !
 

Stan_Deesey

Old-Salt
Who was it that supplied the oggies to the ships, was it Ron or Ivor Dewdney?

I was also wondering about that. I remember the name Ivor Dewdney because they had a pasty shop in Plymouth, but I don´t think it was them. Hopefully there´ll be another former Guz rating along later to enlighten us.

They were really nice oggies, so definitely not from Ginsters.
 
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