New Navy Uniform

Rab_C

LE
Pre-9/11.

Although they weren’t personal issue, they were shared amongst the gangway staff. Which made them “interesting”.

Also issued with a pick-axe handle.

No rifles on the gangway back then.
Hmmmm. I left before the turn of the century and supervised many a weapons handover. I admit SA80 not “that rifle”
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I do think the new PCS for the Andrew seems to be sprouting many new and unnecessary badges; maybe the 2SL is modelling it on the Scouts?
 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
I do think the new PCS for the Andrew seems to be sprouting many new and unnecessary badges; maybe the 2SL is modelling it on the Scouts?
Both 2SL and Dicky Cressida really ought to get miniaturised rank slides** to go with their narrow sloping shoulders.

Jack

** Never epaulettes, a grossly misused expression! :eek:
 
Doesn’t surprise me. I just don’t get how who ever is responsible for designing the RAF kit (and now the RN by the look of it) manages to get it consistently wrong. I reckon Ravers has a point about the traditional styling and quality being a winner. The look and practicality of the uniform we all wear matters.
The best bits of kit in the RAF's dressing-up box are definitely the old heavy-weight Great Coat* and the No 6A Service Dress (ice cream suit). I wager that very, very few people in the RAF have ever seen this and even fewer have worn it. The sword is issued with it (for those who don't happen to have their own...)

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* It is mandatory when two or more officers are seen together in Great Coats, hats are to be worn in a rakish angle and they must pose near a Spitfire.
 
So Upgraded RNPCS information and the second sea lord: the belt is a true service one apparently, something to with on of his roles. The Royal Navy badges on his shoulder…. It was decided to do away with the one on the chest as apparently with a name badge, rank slide, service badge, submariner badge and for officers the command/ PoW/ pilot/ observer badges, it was getting a little too busy. The RN was going to just rely on the White Ensign alone as a service designator and brand recognition. someone pointed out though that civilians may not know the W.E. Is a symbol of the RN and think it just meant the same as the Union Flag, so it was decided to put mudguards on there as we do on the PCSCU uniform.
Zips and velcro were the preferred method of the jacket but we went to buttons as apparently zips are hard to repair (though when I’m somewhere hot I never used the zip and just did the velcro up).

Whats annoying is we went to PCS because it was found that buttonS/ shoulder epaulettes on the old 4’s were uncomfortable when wearing body armour/ fire fighting apparatus, as the equipment would create pressure points on the shoulders, it’s why boarding parties were wearing MTP in 2011/ 2012 when the decision to make RNPCS was made.

Tropic 4’s / 3’s we’re scrapped to pay for RNPCS.

Current 2nd Sea Lord hates 3’s by all accounts and is trying to get it scrapped. It’s no longer worn at sea in the evenings on any ship apart from the QNLZ and I believe and even that’s dying a death now that the old First Lieutenant has left.

Personally I agree with Wafu Bustard, if the current RNPCS had been allowed to be worn as designed (untucked) and we’d been allowed to relax jackets, it would have been better. At one point even the WORN said why does it need to be fire retardant? It’s expensive. If you’re duty / SSEP / at state 2/1 wear your fire retardant overalls.

As for the green issue softies, I prefer wearing a soft shell jacket, but I don’t know why people just don’t get the blue issue softie?


As for the stable belts, I still wear the old one, hard wearing from 2011, but apparently people didn’t like the leather side straps when getting dressed in an emergency, so we got the current shite quality ones. There’s a Commadore over in Bahrain who’s attached an officer’s number ones uniform belt locket Union to his stable belt for some reason.
 

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P.O.N.T.I

War Hero
The whole thing is utterly gash.

Nowhere near enough natural fibers, which reduce sweating and are a damn sight more flash proof.
Stable belt? is a whole new level of c*ntitude. There is no point other than playing dress up.
Damn great metal slide to digs in you.
Just how many pockets are needed.
 
Eighty quid?

Royal Navy types must be really well paid.

Not really, white tops are issued to submariners and coastal forces. Blue tops are not uniform.
 
Why does the RN even have a stable belt when it has no tradition of using horses? A simple duty belt in black or dark blue would suffice.
We just call our current plain blue belt a stable belt. The old one is obsolete and the only people that have em are those that were issued them back when we had CS95s or bought them second hand.

Auld Sweat said:
There was a cloth type belt, with a little pouch built in. did the job. kept the strides from ending up around the ankles.
Ahh the old money belt.
 
In all seriousness why don’t we just go with Bob’s suggestion above?

Do ships still revert to pirate rig as soon as you’re past Gib?

Once at sea we‘d just cut around in a manky old deployment T shirt and shorts. As long as you had your ovies to hand in case of a fire it was all good.

Obviously we‘d put a shirt on if anyone important was coming onboard or we were in port, but at sea it’s not like we had to look smart for anyone but ourselves.

Who are the, "Bridge Gods"?
 

Yarra

War Hero
Who are the, "Bridge Gods"?
I believe they meet on Zoom, every Friday evening. Each four to a separate breakout room.

Selection is tough, based on ones Sweet Sherry pallete and ones ability to complete the National Trust magazine crossword in under half an hour.
 

bob231

War Hero
Who are the, "Bridge Gods"?
Officers of the Watch. The smartly-dressed, dashing young gentlemen and women in whose hands the navigational safety of the Ship lies. These fine specimens of the officer class are known for their professionalism, all-encompassing knowledge and general savoir-faire, as well as being Wren-slayers of the highest repute.

Grubby engineering types can only look on in awe. Any derogatory nicknames you might here are purely a result of jealousy, and nothing to do with significant responsibility going to young heads, young heads that often haven't bothered to take a professional interest in the Ship of which they have Charge.
 

mad_collie

War Hero
Officers of the Watch. The smartly-dressed, dashing young gentlemen and women in whose hands the navigational safety of the Ship lies. These fine specimens of the officer class are known for their professionalism, all-encompassing knowledge and general savoir-faire, as well as being Wren-slayers of the highest repute.

Grubby engineering types can only look on in awe. Any derogatory nicknames you might here are purely a result of jealousy, and nothing to do with significant responsibility going to young heads, young heads that often haven't bothered to take a professional interest in the Ship of which they have Charge.
In other words, chinless wonders.

Thanks for the clarification.
 

Stan_Deesey

Old-Salt
There was a cloth type belt, with a little pouch built in. did the job. kept the strides from ending up around the ankles. ;)

I was never issued one of those. There were loops in the trousers of my 1s and 2 suits for such a belt, but they weren´t on issue when I was in.

The only belt I was issued was on what were then called, ´No. 5s trousers´, and ISTR that they were integral to the trousers. There was no belt to go with our working rig, (No. 8s), but I think the trousers had slide adjusters on the sides.

I ate so much scran that there was never any risk of my uniform trousers falling down anyway, what with my waistline pressing against them. I don´t recall ever worrying about not having a belt as I struggled to fasten my trouser buttons, or tried to pull the hem of my white front down over my girth. Who needs belts when there are three hot meals laid on every day, (including a full English breakfast), plus four-o-clockers?
 

maritime

Old-Salt
I was never issued one of those. There were loops in the trousers of my 1s and 2 suits for such a belt, but they weren´t on issue when I was in.

The only belt I was issued was on what were then called, ´No. 5s trousers´, and ISTR that they were integral to the trousers. There was no belt to go with our working rig, (No. 8s), but I think the trousers had slide adjusters on the sides.

I ate so much scran that there was never any risk of my uniform trousers falling down anyway, what with my waistline pressing against them. I don´t recall ever worrying about not having a belt as I struggled to fasten my trouser buttons, or tried to pull the hem of my white front down over my girth. Who needs belts when there are three hot meals laid on every day, (including a full English breakfast), plus four-o-clockers?
Not forgetting the mandatory 'oggie' at standeasy and 'night flyers' from the A.C.R.B
 
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