New Military Ward CDM

#1
What a ******* Cheek !!!!

Under Secretary of State for Defence, Derek Twigg, said:

"The new hospital will offer outstanding facilities for military patients. Working in partnership with University Hospital, we already provide first-class medical treatment and care for our Service patients.

"The military ward in Birmingham's new hospital further demonstrates our commitment to providing the best possible care for military casualties.

"We will build on the success of the current ward at Selly Oak as we move to the new hospital at Edgbaston."

Sir Jock Stirrup, Chief of the Defence Staff, said:

"Service personnel who are injured on operations deserve the very best medical care we can provide. I am confident that the treatment delivered at Selly Oak is already world class and we will continue to improve on that in this new ward.

"Importantly, the further development of a military atmosphere within the NHS hospital will ensure that our people are cared for in an environment that is conducive to their recovery and well being.
"All of this amongst the most modern facilities of their kind in Europe, and all under the continuing care of the joint NHS and military staff of the Birmingham Hospitals. I am very grateful to the staff for their dedication and professionalism."


Why Did they close Military Hospitals
 
#2
As I have gone on about on many threads on this subject, I cannot understand why when they closed down all the Military Hospitals worldwide they could not fund at least one dedicated Military Hospital in the UK.

Fighting the cold war very little casualties, many dedicated hospitals. Fighting many real wars, large number of casualties, NO dedicated hospitals.

Injuried troops BETRAYED in my humble opinion.

BRING BACK MILITARY HOSPITALS NOW
 
#3
Government priorities have changed.

You, me and our injured colleagues are only given the attention we get 'cos anything else would cost them votes!

Forget the Military, become an Immigrant!
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#4
All the old UK Military Hospitals are now no longer economical to return to their former glory, even Haslar is a money leech costing millions just to maintain, no wonder the NHS is keen to offload it for some rather fetching seaview apartments.
 
#5
Ah yes but I also heard a report on the radio going on about how great it will be.
I thought it was all jolly good until I heard them say
''The ward will accomodate around 30 patients''
Well whoop de fcuking do
 
#6
RAF_Nurse! said:
Government priorities have changed.

You, me and our injured colleagues are only given the attention we get 'cos anything else would cost them votes!

Forget the Military, become an Immigrant!
Not just Government Priorities RAF_Nurse, as I recall, the end of days for Military Hospitals began with the loss of Higher Professional Training for DOCTORS in military hospitals; followed shortly afterwards by our esteemed nursing colleagues losing their 'training ticket' by the RCN, am I wrong? If I am then I APOLOGISE.. As I remember it was nothing as gracious as providing the whole AMS with the right access to clinical experience... I would love nothing more then to see Military Hospitals open again, those were ther DAYS! Camaraderie, Camaraderie, Camaraderie.
 
#7
Not a Wah!

How does Frimley park fit into all this? Surely that's a Military hospital - couldn't we use those facilities for injured troops and keep them in a quasi-military environment?
 
#8
No Frimly Park is not a mil hospital, it is an NHS trust hospital that has military staff working in it staffing a couple of wards theatres and other depts.
 
#9
my good friend and esteemed collegue from the good old days Bulldog is totally correct, there is no actual military 'wing' within Frimley Park Hospital (or any MDHU) as there is at Musgrave Park Hospital, the staff are integrated into the NHS staff, there were two military wards but they are long gone, there were two operating theatres manned by Military ODPs & Scrub nurses (Surgeons & gasmen were either Mil or Civ depending on the list) but they are also gone, I tried to keep the Army theatre staff working together as a team while I was there but I hear that is sadly no longer the case.

Sad to see that when we had Military Hospitals our off duty books were full of staff, they close and MDHUs happen and we are struggling for staff, many do not join the Army to work in the NHS.
 
#10
I've said this before, but I think it bears repeating:

I suspect that many people in the military thought, when the MDHU concept was 'sold' to them, that an MDHU would be like the Duke of Connaught Unit at Musgrave Park - a military medical unit within the grounds of an NHS hospital, with access to NHS specialist care when needed.
 
#11
how (unfortunatley) wrong were people to be!
 
#12
Sepia tint on

Ahh! Military Hospitals, clean tidy wards, smart pressed and starched uniforms, a sense of belonging to an organisation you've chosen to work for, a commitment to providing care to an injured colleague, an inherent bond between staff and patients, a knowing where you are in the organisation and that the organisation cares about you, a structured hierarchy familiar to all serving personnel.

And the civvies loved the traditional values of the military hospitals.

Sepia tint off

Not withstanding the arguments that drove the decision to close the Mil Hosps - they were deemed to be valid at the time, we are in a different time clinically, politically and operationally now.

If we step away from the idea that the AMS provide an all inclusive standalone Health Service, and look at providing Secondary Healthcare (and Out patient follow up/physio etc) for Service personnel by Service personnel, with interface with the NHS (based on clinical need) as and when required, then a solution could found.

With the Political will (to provide funding etc) there is, IMHO, no reason why a Mil Hosp cannot be established.

HPT for Drs can remain on rotation through the NHS and Mil Wards.
Nurse Trg is through Universities now.

CPD, and if necessary after TNA, clinical skills training (for all HP's), can be done through University and Clinical placements in the NHS (a bit like the MDHU's do now).

This merges the benefits of Mil Hosps with the benefits associated with NHS expertise.


Sorry if I have added nothing to the debate other than state the obvious.



lyse



edited to add: 2 hrs to post so missed Viro Bono's input
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#13
Local coverage

SOURCE

Soldiers heap praise on Selly Oak military hospital
Jul 6 2008

Patients on the military managed ward at Selly Oak Hospital have heaped praise on the facility.

Military personal injured overseas are cared for on the ward alongside civilian patients. Medical care is provided by military medics and civilian staff.

Lt Col David Richmond, 41, of Fifth Battalion, the Royal Regiment of Scotland, is at the hospital recovering from a leg wound. The commanding officer was shot in the thigh on June 12 in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

He is the most senior British officer to be injured in Afghanistan. Speaking of the moment he was shot he said: “I was out on the ground with the rest of the battle group clearing a town when I was shot.

“Some Taliban re-infiltrated up and fired a burst, some of which hit me. It was a surreal experience. The bullet came in through the back of my thigh, through my femur on the way and out through the front, unfortunately taking some of the bone with it.

“I didn’t feel pain to begin with, it rather takes your breath away. I was treated on the scene by US marines who were very good. Within minutes I was passed on to our own medics, then our own doctor.

“Things happen around you very quickly, it’s quite encouraging to see how quickly things happen.”

The care at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham had been “first class” he said.

“My treatment here has been great, I have been looked after very well. There should be a full recovery in due course. I should be out of here hopefully in the next week or 10 days.

“I was flown back here on June 14. The care from all the staff here has been fantastic, without any doubt. We are all treated by a complete mixture of doctors and nurses, military and civilian.

“There have been a lot of negative stories but the reality could not be more different. Maybe this place has had its growing pains but my experience has been first class.

“I think we’ve got this right and it is time people acknowledged that. I have wanted for nothing, the care here has been absolutely fantastic.
‘‘I have no complaints about it at all.”

His wife Alison, 41, added: “I have been really really well looked after. You’re not thinking straight at first but all that is taken away from you here. There is always someone to talk to.

“The other families are great and there are liaison officers here for support. I know it helps David, the fact that I am looked after.
“You are allocated a liaison officer and the nurses here are all lovely.

“All the way through, even if I just need a lift somewhere, I just ask and it is done.”

Royal Marine Peter Dunning, 23, part of the Armoured Support Group, lost both legs when the vehicle he was travelling in went over a makeshift mine in Helmand province on May 25.

He was on his second tour of duty in the country. He said: “The care which I have been getting here is fantastic. My family have been staying in the military flats and they have been saying that the care they have been getting from the welfare staff has been absolutely brilliant.

“I have heard that the hospital has been criticised but from my point of view that is all absolute rubbish. I can’t fault my treatment at all. The nurses are there every step of the way. It has been absolutely top notch.”
Sadly, none of this has appeared in the London papers.

Thought medical perss might wish to sight......make up your own minds.
 
#14
different people have different experiences.

I think the majority of the bad news came from the 'early days'.
 
#15
Just another thought.With Catterick fast becoming a super garrison with numbers fast approaching twenty five thousand and more plus their families. A large chunk of real estate (the former DHK) which is not being used and also a large civilian population within the Richmond area. Just an idea, would this not a prime location for a military hospital....?
 
#16
Lateach said:
Just another thought.With Catterick fast becoming a super garrison with numbers fast approaching twenty five thousand and more plus their families. A large chunk of real estate (the former DHK) which is not being used and also a large civilian population within the Richmond area. Just an idea, would this not a prime location for a military hospital....?
Cracking Idea; I'm sure it will be considered...

 

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#17
Lateach said:
Just another thought.With Catterick fast becoming a super garrison with numbers fast approaching twenty five thousand and more plus their families. A large chunk of real estate (the former DHK) which is not being used and also a large civilian population within the Richmond area. Just an idea, would this not a prime location for a military hospital....?
Far too good and simple idea for the politicians to follow, not only could they treat the local military community and their families but also those returning from operations.
 

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