New MI5 chief says UK facing 'nasty mix' of threats

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
This is the sort of Karen I am referring to:

' You can't take my temperature....that's against the law...you're not an MD!...'

Um....my workplace and a bazillion others have been doing that before every shift over here in UK......I feel every sympathy for shopworkers and any other public-facing folk in 'Murica having to deal on a daily basis with brain-donor zombie fodder mentalists like this.


Where is Bill Bryson in his country's hour of need ?

I thought he had re-emigrated to put a stop to this sort of thing :scratch: ?

TheJuiceMedia said:
Egregious levels of sh1tfúckery

 
Strangely, that last video is an example of cowardly bumlicking rather than the genuine satire it purports to be.
The real thing targets the heart of the issue, while this example merely licks the edges, and fails to address it in its whole, entire, appalling totalitarianism. Australians usually get this sort of thing right, but they need to be a little more penetrating. Satire needs saw-teeth and truth, not just vague implication.

The pity is that the UK doesn't seem to have anyone up to that standard in this particular field. Perhaps Rod Liddle could make a little pastiche, or Clarkson, Taki,* or even Delingpole.

*No, not Taki. That fecker's away with the faeries.

Sorry, dreaming again.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
We will agree to differ - ask an Aussie about 'Honest Government Ads' ; they make me smile, even without a beer in my hand.

[/rabbit-hole] EXAMPLE:
 
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Yokel

LE
This is one of those threats, highlighted by Deborah Haynes at Sky News...

Iran's Secret Cyber Files

Classified documents, allegedly from Iran, reveal secret research into how a cyber attack could be used to sink a cargo ship or blow up a fuel pump at a petrol station.

The internal files, obtained by Sky News, also include information on satellite communication devices used by the global shipping industry as well as a computer-based system that controls things like lights, heating and ventilation in smart buildings across the world.

The papers appear to reveal a particular interest in researching companies and activities in western countries, including the UK, France and the United States.

A security source with knowledge of the 57-page bundle of five research reports said it was compiled by a secret, offensive cyber unit called Shahid Kaveh, which is part of Iran's elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps' (IRGC) cyber command.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Basic Security Awareness in non-MoD departments I have worked in and alongside seemed virtually non-existent.

.....

From the news this day - a case in point.


Civil servant who lost MoD files at a bus stop was to be UK’s ambassador to Nato

has been redeployed from the MoD to the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, from where he was on secondment.


His entire career had been spent previously in a variety of non-MoD roles - NHS, Home Office, and finally the FCO .


D1ck.
 

Yokel

LE
Is it very unusual for civil servants to move from one department to another?

Surely all Government departments have their share of sensitive information? The FCDO deals with things like foreign policy, diplomacy, and intelligence. From the link: Angus Lapsley was the Director for Defence, International Security and South East Europe at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) from 2017 until 2019.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
No.....it goes back to the antique notion of being a 'Generalist' at Senior staff level (Above OF5)

For most of my time in MoD, up till around 1995, the MoD grew its own Permanent Under Secretary (PUS)
i.e the head of the Department was home grown, and had (usually) spent his entire career working with the military.

( IIRC the first non-MoD Civ Serp to become our PUS transplanted from GCHQ.
I have lost track/interest since then. )

Below PUS level between Grade 7 and the top, there has always been a fair amount of movement between the principal Departments of State : FCO,Defence,Treasury,Home Office etc.
Tended to be people involved in fast-stream or MIDIT scheme (Graduate entry trainees) rather than hoi-polloi chancers like me.

( Although Treasury pers were usually short term appointees within MoD to ensure fiscal compliance rather than anything else)

Responsibilities sometimes shift between Departments too - for example, what was between 1966 and 1993 a Defence responsibility for overseas sales of mil eqpt , now sits within the Department of Trade & Industry ( or whatever they choose to call themselves this month )

This guy is an example of the 21st C approach, in terms of his career to date:

New Permanent Secretary for Ministry of Defence

Ministers, of course, come and go as they are political appointees ....as famously observed by Sir Robin Day to an unamused John Nott, briefly Sec of State for Defence.

 
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Yokel

LE
Not nearly briefly enough.

Long enough to let the Argentine dictatorship believe that invading the Falklands would not be opposed, and to weaken NATO. A merchant banker making a decision purely on the basis of numbers with context, and determined to ignore evidence and intelligence from the South Atlantic.

Yet he got knighted and is wheeled out as a 'senior statesman'.
 

Yokel

LE
This is the video the US Navy made to cover the lessons learned after the Walker spy ring.



No security clearance - WTF? Dealing with sensitive information was their day job.
Blind eye turned to removing Secret material from the building.
Excessive and unnecessary print outs ignored.
Blind eye turned to excessive photocopying.
Blind eye turned to contact with Soviet Bloc citizens.

Within defence, and List X companies all of those things have been addressed. But what about other Government departments, non List X companies and so on?
 
This is the video the US Navy made to cover the lessons learned after the Walker spy ring.



No security clearance - WTF? Dealing with sensitive information was their day job.
Blind eye turned to removing Secret material from the building.
Excessive and unnecessary print outs ignored.
Blind eye turned to excessive photocopying.
Blind eye turned to contact with Soviet Bloc citizens.

Within defence, and List X companies all of those things have been addressed. But what about other Government departments, non List X companies and so on?
"In this whole equation of spy versus security systems, there is one more (!) important component; people".

I can hear 'whoosh' over the heads of some tech-obsessed types. People are the root, the cause, the target, the means, and their motivation, access and points of contact the whole point. Machinery and comms systems are operated by them, but it's their plans and intentions which matter.

Sorry; old habits.
 

Yokel

LE
Security is not a dirty word.

Briton suspected to spying for Russia arrested in Germany - BBC News

A British man has been arrested in Germany on suspicion of spying for Russia.

German federal prosecutors said the man - named only as David S - worked at the British embassy in Berlin.

He allegedly passed documents to Russian intelligence "at least once" in exchange for an "unknown amount" of money.

He was arrested in Potsdam outside Berlin on Tuesday and his home and workplace have been searched.

A spokesman for Germany's foreign ministry quoted by AFP news agency said Berlin was taking the case "very seriously", and said spying by "a close alliance partner on German soil is unacceptable".

The arrest was the result of a joint UK-German investigation, the statement read.

It was intelligence-led and had been going on for some time leading up to the arrest, the BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera says. MI5 and other UK agencies, as well as British police, had been working with the Germans to learn as much as they could about the alleged activity.
 

CC_TA

LE
Security is not a dirty word.

Briton suspected to spying for Russia arrested in Germany - BBC News

A British man has been arrested in Germany on suspicion of spying for Russia.

German federal prosecutors said the man - named only as David S - worked at the British embassy in Berlin.

He allegedly passed documents to Russian intelligence "at least once" in exchange for an "unknown amount" of money.

He was arrested in Potsdam outside Berlin on Tuesday and his home and workplace have been searched.

A spokesman for Germany's foreign ministry quoted by AFP news agency said Berlin was taking the case "very seriously", and said spying by "a close alliance partner on German soil is unacceptable".

The arrest was the result of a joint UK-German investigation, the statement read.

It was intelligence-led and had been going on for some time leading up to the arrest, the BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera says. MI5 and other UK agencies, as well as British police, had been working with the Germans to learn as much as they could about the alleged activity.

Probably lucky zee Germans got him before there was a luggage incident.

222640288_6313451815331910_3627629240187980190_n.jpg
 
Security is not a dirty word.

Briton suspected to spying for Russia arrested in Germany - BBC News

A British man has been arrested in Germany on suspicion of spying for Russia.

German federal prosecutors said the man - named only as David S - worked at the British embassy in Berlin.

He allegedly passed documents to Russian intelligence "at least once" in exchange for an "unknown amount" of money.

He was arrested in Potsdam outside Berlin on Tuesday and his home and workplace have been searched.

A spokesman for Germany's foreign ministry quoted by AFP news agency said Berlin was taking the case "very seriously", and said spying by "a close alliance partner on German soil is unacceptable".

The arrest was the result of a joint UK-German investigation, the statement read.

It was intelligence-led and had been going on for some time leading up to the arrest, the BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera says. MI5 and other UK agencies, as well as British police, had been working with the Germans to learn as much as they could about the alleged activity.
He's been named locally as David Smith, 57, a security guard working for a contractor. He reportedly drives a Fiesta.
 
Security is not a dirty word.

Briton suspected to spying for Russia arrested in Germany - BBC News

A British man has been arrested in Germany on suspicion of spying for Russia.

German federal prosecutors said the man - named only as David S - worked at the British embassy in Berlin.

He allegedly passed documents to Russian intelligence "at least once" in exchange for an "unknown amount" of money.

He was arrested in Potsdam outside Berlin on Tuesday and his home and workplace have been searched.

A spokesman for Germany's foreign ministry quoted by AFP news agency said Berlin was taking the case "very seriously", and said spying by "a close alliance partner on German soil is unacceptable".

The arrest was the result of a joint UK-German investigation, the statement read.

It was intelligence-led and had been going on for some time leading up to the arrest, the BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera says. MI5 and other UK agencies, as well as British police, had been working with the Germans to learn as much as they could about the alleged activity.

Lord Melchett Walt. :)
 

Yokel

LE
According to the DM, he also, "holds extreme right wing views".

The Russian, Chinese, Iranian, and other intelligence services are not too fussy who they get information from. One of the possible motivations for espionage is resentment, and the Putin regime is in no way left wing.

I wonder if the good old saying 'absence of the normal - presence of the abnormal' is sufficiently imprinted in people's minds?
 
Um....my workplace and a bazillion others have been doing that before every shift over here in UK......I feel every sympathy for shopworkers and any other public-facing folk in 'Murica having to deal on a daily basis with brain-donor zombie fodder mentalists like this.
Old work you couldn't get through the mantrap (is it OK to still call it that?) without passing a temperature check. Customer, staff or director, high temperature and you're not coming in.
 

Yokel

LE
I cannot for a moment imagine that the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban has anything other than grave implications for things like counter terrorism, or dealing with the organised crimes associated with Afghan grown Heroin.

The World has got even more nasty.
 
I cannot for a moment imagine that the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban has anything other than grave implications for things like counter terrorism, or dealing with the organised crimes associated with Afghan grown Heroin.

The World has got even more nasty.

Something of an understatement, I fear. First, every customer of Alan's Snack-bar has enjoyed an epic morale boost following the humiliating defeat of the Great Satan. They'll be well up for it. Secondly, we're about to allow thousands of Afghans, many of whom we have no way of fully vetting, to settle in this country.

I wouldn't blame the DG of the Security Service if he reached for the Single Malt after discussing the ramifications of the Fall of Saigon 2.0 with his senior staff. The jobs of the police and Security Service just got much more difficult. And dangerous.
 
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