New GSM medal clasp award for crew of HMS DARING

ugly

LE
Moderator
The Defence Medal (as with the War Medal and the 39-45 Star) could be earned through service outside the UK. GSM w/c 'NORTHERN IRELAND' is, to date, the only campaign medal awarded solely for service within UK.
Its not an argument
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
well then, you're clearly not getting into the spirit of the internet
You could be awarded the GSM 1962 for service overseas, its only the bar that counts
 
Council? Are they now electing groups of people to run HM War Canoes these days?

OTH a junior counselling their seniors - was anyone actually in charge of that particular ship.

And feedback on activities "Yes Boss, that was a great piss-up, let's have another."

Life seems to be somewhat different now in the Andrew than in the days of HMS Troutbridge :rolleyes:

My bold this one the navy lark youtube - Bing video
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
Really? I doubt it, some wag may consider the fact that only 1 deployed to be indicative of cannibalisation of the others for parts and crews.
But maybe this is a sweetener to assist with retention, after all they are fast sinking in the retention and recruitment stakes. Born in Guz, backscuttled in the gulf
I don't see any cannibalisation for parts/crew. There is a major regeneration programme for the 45s with significant propulsion, power upgrades along with other new capabilities, which will be intrusive and demanding.

Whilst that's underway the trick is to maintain sufficient 45s generated for tasking.
 
what about
The Defence Medal (as with the War Medal and the 39-45 Star) could be earned through service outside the UK. GSM w/c 'NORTHERN IRELAND' is, to date, the only campaign medal awarded solely for service within UK.
apart from GSM 1918-62 clasp "Bomb and Mine Clearance 1945–49" Awarded for a total of 180 days active engagement in the removal of mines and bombs in the UK between May 1945 and December 1949 and the Battle of Britain Clasp to the 1939-45 Star(ok that's above the UK)
 
So exactly what happened to DARING then - intensive work up, 9 month deployment and risk and threat from repeated attacks in the region they were operating in.

I think you have conveniently missed post #123

Kind of blows your argument out of the water..........................................see what I did there?:boogie:
 
I think you have conveniently missed post #123

Kind of blows your argument out of the water..........................................see what I did there?:boogie:
Groooan...

Risk&Rigour is inherently different for each service due to the nature of their environment.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
I wonder if anyone has a figure for the number of 'accidental deaths' in the RN since the war? (maybe @jim30 a can put a number on it). Going to sea is dangerous and always has been and always will be. A contemporary and sometime schoolmate of mine is still entombed in HMAS Voyager at the bottom of the oggin as a result of a collision, along with 80+ other shipmates. That's why the 'dangers of the sea' precede the 'violence of the enemy' in the naval prayer I think. Quite separately, the figure for FAA aircrew losses since 1945 must be enormous. It includes three of my term who are still sitting in their cabs at the bottom of the Med, Lyme Bay and the Malacca Strait. Of their bones is coral made.

As to the Cod Wars (above) I don't think there were any awards in spite of many bumpy collisions.
 
I wonder if anyone has a figure for the number of 'accidental deaths' in the RN since the war? (maybe @jim30 a can put a number on it). Going to sea is dangerous and always has been and always will be. A contemporary and sometime schoolmate of mine is still entombed in HMAS Voyager at the bottom of the oggin as a result of a collision, along with 80+ other shipmates. That's why the 'dangers of the sea' precede the 'violence of the enemy' in the naval prayer I think. Quite separately, the figure for FAA aircrew losses since 1945 must be enormous. It includes three of my term who are still sitting in their cabs at the bottom of the Med, Lyme Bay and the Malacca Strait. Of their bones is coral made.

As to the Cod Wars (above) I don't think there were any awards in spite of many bumpy collisions.
According to research carried out at Oxford in 2002 the most dangerous occupation in the UK was deep sea fisherman followed by merchant seaman. It doesn't mention military deaths but the sea is the sea - dangerous to all.

Hazardous occupations in Great Britain. - PubMed - NCBI
 
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