New female infanteers - how's it going?

Oyibo

LE
Snipped...

Good luck to this woman though - as long as she is treated in the exact same way as the men, runs at the same speed, carries the same weight and isn't some sort of diversity hire from some PC brigade type twat in an office somewhere.

The mentality of the Parachute Regiment at the moment seems to be (I left years ago, so don't quote me) that is is a meritocracy: Men, women, skin colour, sexuality, etc. Doesn't matter. Pass the (high) standards and you're in.

Personally I have no problem with that - it is the intelligent way to prevent standards falling.
 
We need more women sewage workers, bricklayers, roofers, etc - and women to do the heavy jobs that men tend to do such as installing power cables in the arctic and places like that.
I've often argued this - it's absolutely fine to say that there should be more women in the most senior roles in companies, as long as you apply that to other jobs as well. We have a female refuse collector in my area...one.

Whilst some of the self-declared feminists I know agree in person that there should be more women in manual jobs, it's only the CEO positions that they seem to should publicly about.
 
The mentality of the Parachute Regiment at the moment seems to be (I left years ago, so don't quote me) that is is a meritocracy: Men, women, skin colour, sexuality, etc. Doesn't matter. Pass the (high) standards and you're in.

Personally I have no problem with that - it is the intelligent way to prevent standards falling.
What about milling ?
 
The mentality of the Parachute Regiment at the moment seems to be (I left years ago, so don't quote me) that is is a meritocracy: Men, women, skin colour, sexuality, etc. Doesn't matter. Pass the (high) standards and you're in.

Personally I have no problem with that - it is the intelligent way to prevent standards falling.

You would like to think thats the mentality in the whole Armed Forces
 

Oyibo

LE
What about milling ?
Can't pass P Coy without milling.

That is the point about saying "we'll take anyone, but they have to meet the standards".

And yes, the RA woman who passed did the milling. Fair play to her.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm sure this is correct, but you'll remember that in 2009 Richards did Op ENTIRETY, part of which was mandating that units / IAs did PDT and OPTAG properly. COIST (the Int Corps role I was mostly referring to) began in 2010. So post 2009, you were a lot more culpable if you were sacking it off, as well as more directly disobeying orders.

I was also in the eye of the storm for this with another Int Corps role, for which as a specialist thing it was allowed to do its own training. The standard was still abysmal (literally months just sat unsupervised at a DII terminal told to 'read in') when I was posted into it in 2011, and remained that way for at least a year. This despite the issue having been raised by the 3 preceding deploying officers, so 18 months of direct feedback saying: our soldiers aren't being trained properly for this. I got career fouled for making the same complaint to the CoC during our 'PDT' (which I was assigned to write and run, 8 weeks before deploying, with no experience).

Other units may well have done the same. I just saw Commanding Officers who skimped on probably the most fundamental aspect of their non-operational role, preparing their soldiers for operations, despite direct orders from CGS and consistent feedback from their subordinates. The same individuals found time to prioritise Bn parades, dinners, Corps days, Bn showoff days, which they all enthusiastically self-generated. Note: not AT, or fluff for the soldiers. Fluff which took time and effort from the soldiers to plump up "the Bn" or, more usually, a CO or HQ. Officers who behave that way don't deserve rank. They undermined both the letter and the spirit of their orders and officership. Instead, they continued to promote. There are many Cols and at least one Brigadier (so far) who I'll never give the courtesy of their rank, because they aren't worthy of it.

Sandhurst, various bits of doctrine, lessons and speeches by officers over the years, make it very, very clear that, outside of operations, the No.1 duty of an officer is preparing their soldiers for operations. Somewhere up in the top three is also: following legitimate orders. Yet, remarkably, many of us who took this lesson literally and objected to those clear principles being ignored and subordinated to fluff, were instead vilified; told we didn't get 'the real Army'; told we lacked judgement; told we were disloyal; and got career fouls. The Majors today who have remained in from that peer group are, probably not coincidentally, disproportionately those who were involved in and enthusiastic about the fluff.

To this day - and I think you're a wise and considered poster - I marvel at the ability of officers to translate this clear abdication of their core role as "well, everyone was doing it". Officers who behaved that way betrayed their fundamental duty to their soldiers, and in the name of nothing, other than their own aggrandizement. And an Army that not only allowed this but rewarded it is fundamentally broken. It has earned a lifetime of cynicism from my generation precisely because what you describe was widespread. It's not an excuse - it's the problem.
Christ on a bike - pre Op BANNER training was nigh on 3 months for an APC squadron, when you factored in the driver training. I cannot imagine anyone thinking they could simply 'chin it off'. I recall doing 3 days in Chilwell and RSOI for my HERRICK tour. I suppose it was a NIRTT equivalent.
 
Given that the Parachute Regiment have a 1/3 - 1/2 failure rate for their YOs (and as such have sought yet more YOs from RMAS), I'm not holding my breath.
 

Oyibo

LE
Given that the Parachute Regiment have a 1/3 - 1/2 failure rate for their YOs (and as such have sought yet more YOs from RMAS), I'm not holding my breath.

Yes, but giving everyone the same opportunity ensures that the high standards are maintained. I'm sure that the P Coy staff will have been well briefed on this.
 
Can't pass P Coy without milling.

That is the point about saying "we'll take anyone, but they have to meet the standards".

And yes, the RA woman who passed did the milling. Fair play to her.
I'm sure that many women could dish it out, but finding a male opponent to go full steam at battering a woman without holding back must be awkward. I couldn't and wouldn't do it.
 
I'm sure that many women could dish it out, but finding a male opponent to go full steam at battering a woman without holding back must be awkward. I couldn't and wouldn't do it.
Then the man would be shit in the paras if he was going to hold back against an enemy female combatant.
 
A female Officer Cadet has been accepted by the RMAS Regimental Selection Board for The Parachute Regiment. Obviously there is still P Coyand PCBC to pass, but it should be interesting to see how she does.
Please say it is Denise Webb
 

RTU'd

LE
A female Officer Cadet has been accepted by the RMAS Regimental Selection Board for The Parachute Regiment. Obviously there is still P Coyand PCBC to pass, but it should be interesting to see how she does.
All infantry roles are open to all these days.
The SAS had women from The Det working alongside them since the 1980's.
They can do the job, some very well, its just the physical crap they can sometimes not do.
UKSFG has a number of woman attached & a few good ones in JFIG also.
It's not all about the macho side these days but Hearts & Minds and the soft approach.
 
I'm sure that many women could dish it out, but finding a male opponent to go full steam at battering a woman without holding back must be awkward. I couldn't and wouldn't do it.
I think you would change your mind after the first punch lands on your hooter. Anyway, if you don't show enough aggression they make you fight again and would probably put you up against a big bruiser.
 

anglo

LE
I think you would change your mind after the first punch lands on your hooter. Anyway, if you don't show enough aggression they make you fight again and would probably put you up against a big bruiser.
Also, when an angry female with a rifle is charging at you, with the intent to do
you serous harm, you'd change your mind in a big hurry.
 
All infantry roles are open to all these days.
The SAS had women from The Det working alongside them since the 1980's.
They can do the job, some very well, its just the physical crap they can sometimes not do.
UKSFG has a number of woman attached & a few good ones in JFIG also.
It's not all about the macho side these days but Hearts & Minds and the soft approach.

Having a female in a covert role is a game changer.

A 'courting couple' can loiter without suspicion far longer than a male ever can.

They're nosey bastards too, picking up on everything and can eavesdrop conversations whilst chattering at ten to the dozen.
 

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