New EU copyright laws could seriously curb free expression and "open source" material.

NSP

LE
Seems that Brussels is bimbling along another road paved with good intentions that inevitably and ultimately leads down a blind alley with some new copyright laws that we're likely to fold into our own law despite in all likelihood being out of the EU when it comes into the effect.

Controversial EU copyright reforms Articles 11 and 13 move one step closer | Computing
EU countries back copyright reforms aimed at Google, Facebook | Reuters
Czech Wikipedia to shut down on Thursday over EU copyright reform | Radio Prague
Updated: EU copyright debate turns sinister as MEP receives bomb threat

I can see a lot of content (like ArRSe, perhaps?) giving up as the implementations prove too costly or time-consuming, and/or lawsuits mount up.

A reasonably plain description of the bone of contention and a handy petition link for the protest-minded:-
Save the Internet
 
Ironic when the last amendment of EU copyright law led to a rights grap of photographs that was either deemed orphaned or had mysteriously had it's metadata stripped by the time it was used by media companies

Does it now protect artists fairly by overturning the previous rights grap?
 
As usual, it's not about what it's purported to be about, it's just about 'mastering the internet'. About decentralising control and curtailing free speech. None of this is done for the benefit of copyright holders. Look how youtube monetise other people's music via advertising and just make it almost impossible to fight. Now though, the big corporations are getting involved and you have AI and Machine Learning algorithms that can detect copyrighted work literallly as quickly as it is put up (being uploaded) and DMCA notices are taken extremely seriously. It was always that easy, but until the big boys got involved they threw the smaller content makers to the wolves. Youtube is now positoning itself as an alternative TV platform with exclusive content, even set up their own studio to help content developers. They don't care about the small fry.


Having said that, with regard to this new jobby, more than that I don't know. I looked in to it a bit and just got totally confused. I don't really have a clue how it's supposed to work. Some sites say it will change the internet as we know it and it's a serious step to dismantling basic freedoms, others say 'meh' nothing to see here, it's unenforcable and life will just go on as before. I really don't know, this is a funny one.

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I can see a lot of content (like ArRSe, perhaps?) giving up as the implementations prove too costly or time-consuming, and/or lawsuits mount up.
-----------

Funny, I was thinking about that old Military Photos website that shut down. Didn't they have some similar problem? There might have been other reasons but I think the gist of it was that it was just unmanageable to work through and check so many copyrighted photos that people were putting up, and also the take down notices of people that owned copyright. I probably got that totally wrong. There were some great photos there. I do remember them telling people not to upload stuff that belonged to other people though, but it was a losing battle.

That sentence I quoted from you rang a bell with regard to them, and if this does go ahead and be as nefarious as some people say, it really could effect arrse as well as many other sites.

The golden age of the internet is over. Pretty soon there will be only 3 sites you can visit and it will be illegal not to do so. Yeah I know, but it's going that way.

Nobody cares about content creators and copyright holders. Unless it's the big corporations in cahoots with big goverment and there's money to be made or controls to be enforced. They work hand in hand.
 

NSP

LE
Now though, the big corporations are getting involved and you have AI and Machine Learning algorithms that can detect copyrighted work literally as quickly as it is put up
Yet they don't seem to be able to do the same for content such as terrorism-promotion or kiddie-fiddling on their platforms...
 
Before the internet people's thoughts and opinion could be controlled by type and broadcast, The internet changed that, fewer people watch TV and even less read newspapers. News sources use click bait to capture your thoughts with a never-ending diatribe of unworthy opinions in an attempt to hang on to what little impression they have left.

People have been using the internet to directly communicate their thoughts and opinions and the same people who lost the ability to control the "narrative", now seek to control it once again.

This is nothing but a first step, controlling your expression.

Politics is going to get very interesting in the coming years.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Once we ae out of the EU we will be free of this sort of interference for good
 
No because politics is politics and some of our politicians will want to control the narrative too.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Seems that Brussels is bimbling along another road paved with good intentions that inevitably and ultimately leads down a blind alley with some new copyright laws that we're likely to fold into our own law despite in all likelihood being out of the EU when it comes into the effect.

Controversial EU copyright reforms Articles 11 and 13 move one step closer | Computing
EU countries back copyright reforms aimed at Google, Facebook | Reuters
Czech Wikipedia to shut down on Thursday over EU copyright reform | Radio Prague
Updated: EU copyright debate turns sinister as MEP receives bomb threat

I can see a lot of content (like ArRSe, perhaps?) giving up as the implementations prove too costly or time-consuming, and/or lawsuits mount up.

A reasonably plain description of the bone of contention and a handy petition link for the protest-minded:-
Save the Internet
The theory being that if the rules aren't on UK statute books already then they have no chance of making it. The current bill to change the existing front pages of all current Eu Legislation on UK books to read as UK legislation prior to the big sift is eating up the time, I dont foresee any new rules.
 
It's ironic that the 'upload filter' system they are proposing is in violation of the EU's own laws.
If you don't know what these filters entail, essentially, every post you make on ARRSE will first have to be fed through a centralised EU approved filtering system to ensure that everything you post is not in violation of some copyright holder. Everything you put online will be scanned and 'approved' by the EU. Not very sinister at all, is it?
It will also scan for links to websites that will be able to charge the site owner for the link to their 'property'.
Even though this has been proven to kill traffic news sites when these link taxes were implemented in Germany and Spain previously.
Yes folk, the very founding basis of the internet, the ability to share and spread ideas and knowledge, will be severely curtailed by this EU legislation.
 

SixBadges

On ROPS
On ROPs
The EU are determined to kill off independent creators. There was cheering in the EU parliament when articles 11 and 13 were passed.
These directives will effectively kill ArRSE because we will no longer be able to post links like this
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The EU are determined to kill off independent creators. There was cheering in the EU parliament when articles 11 and 13 were passed.
These directives will effectively kill ArRSE because we will no longer be able to post links like this
Whilst in theory I have no problem with supporting copyright and the income stream that authors deserve this is just another sledgehammer to crack a nut that doesn't really need cracking!
 
Yet there is still a substantive number of people who say that EU membership is a positive... Once article 13 comes into force they wont be able to criticise it 'on the internet'
 

NSP

LE
Once we ae out of the EU we will be free of this sort of interference for good
The theory being that if the rules aren't on UK statute books already then they have no chance of making it. The current bill to change the existing front pages of all current Eu Legislation on UK books to read as UK legislation prior to the big sift is eating up the time, I dont foresee any new rules.
But that's the worry - government has already indicated that it will adopt any new EU legislation that it thinks is a good idea as well as that necessary to facilitate compliance with any trade needs or Anglo-EU treaty obligations. Given the Europhile nature of the majority in Westminster it wouldn't surprise me if they just slavishly adopt everything as if we were still in, using the cop-out excuse, "We need this; it's for our best."
 

NSP

LE
I imagine that one of the first effects on Western culture will be the loss to comedy of this sort of thing:-



...and the loss to political protest of this sort of thing:-



(Not necessarily a bad thing).

...and the loss of countless memes. Given the way SPOTY is going at it with them on the Farage thread he/she/it'll die of impotent rage. BB will be lost when his crying baby pics get pinged by the filter every time he tries to post them, unless he goes out and takes some pictures of crying babies of his own (followed closely by an uncomfortable conversation with Op. Yewtree).

So it's not all bad, then.
 

NSP

LE
Yet there is still a substantive number of people who say that EU membership is a positive... Once article 13 comes into force they wont be able to criticise it 'on the internet'
Why? As long as they post their own opinion and/or material then it's their copyright (until they actually post it, when it becomes the forum/newspaper/news channels copyright, or however they word their ToCoS).
 
@NSP How many forum blogs or media sharing sites like Youtube, will survive. Big media will of course pony up some money, it works in there interest to see Alt Media pushed off. add to that the cash and time limit bounds and well...

Alt media is a mix of the very good and the awful but even the awful has a right to speak. This whole directive has been pushed by lobbyist rather than the general population, or market place. Just look at this forum here I cannot see it being financially viable for Good and Bad CO's to continue once this is brought into law.
 
@NSP How many forum blogs or media sharing sites like Youtube, will survive. Big media will of course pony up some money, it works in there interest to see Alt Media pushed off. add to that the cash and time limit bounds and well...

Alt media is a mix of the very good and the awful but even the awful has a right to speak. This whole directive has been pushed by lobbyist rather than the general population, or market place. Just look at this forum here I cannot see it being financially viable for Good and Bad CO's to continue once this is brought into law.
And therein lies the problem. In the 21st century, people communicate via forums and message boards as a normal means of communication, helping out and for the spreading of ideas.
From places like ARRSE to forums discussing brass bands or care for the elderly, this suddenly places costs on simply communicating.
This will affect millions upon millions of EU 'citizens' who use forums every day and find their sources of help, community and information suddenly vanishing due to not being able to afford the EU's surveillance tax.
Sorry, upload filters.
How the EU ever thought that this could be acceptable is beyond me. It is sinister in a way I cannot find words for.
 
@NSP How many forum blogs or media sharing sites like Youtube, will survive. Big media will of course pony up some money, it works in there interest to see Alt Media pushed off. add to that the cash and time limit bounds and well...

Alt media is a mix of the very good and the awful but even the awful has a right to speak. This whole directive has been pushed by lobbyist rather than the general population, or market place. Just look at this forum here I cannot see it being financially viable for Good and Bad CO's to continue once this is brought into law.
Hopefully content will move to the Dark Web, it will be a bit harder for them to control that
 
Hopefully content will move to the Dark Web, it will be a bit harder for them to control that
Having to move to the dark net is evading the issue, and do you think that Authoritarians will let that slide... For the good of the children or such like.
 
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