New drill and acessories required - what's the best brand to buy?

Slime

LE
I would if cordless was not essential the 18V ones eat through batteries.

I don’t have one of these tools, but are any of them brushless?
Brushless tools are more expensive, but much better on battery life.

When I did look into these I noted that they could also be tool or tool-less blade change, with tool-less being more convenient but more expensive.

I know you didn’t ask the original question, but you did mention battery life.

All academic now :)
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Good call. Thinking about it, a cordless one isn't absolutely necessary.

Ta muchly.
I use a multitool, a Bosch one, excellent for cutting tiles out, cutting joists and things in tight corners etc
but

and its a big but
use the bloody thing sparingly, I chippie I know developed VWF from using one to cut tiles and trim things when kitchen fitting
 
Aye, whitefinger. Nasty.

We have a networking job to do, trailing out CAT5 (not 5e) and putting in CAT7 with new trunking for futureproofing. It's a big building with small subdivided offices. Some of it's old, some new, some new-ish, some dicked-about with. Skirtings, no skirtings, etc you get the drift.

I'm not an electrician, but I am a Cisco Cert'd Network engineer. We can offer services that other electrical contractors don't. Looks good if the "computer guy" is involved in the whole thing, supervising network cable runs and punchdown, patchpanels. I can also make sure the sparks don't break/mess with anything they shouldn't. (Just kidding, all good lads)

It's a part-time job, and the boss has been great: he's buying this for me.
 

MR_R_SOLE

Old-Salt
I don’t have one of these tools, but are any of them brushless?
Brushless tools are more expensive, but much better on battery life.

When I did look into these I noted that they could also be tool or tool-less blade change, with tool-less being more convenient but more expensive.

I know you didn’t ask the original question, but you did mention battery life.

All academic now :)


Brushless are better on batteries Bristol not great.
The tooled blade change isn't really a problem mine's 6mm Alan key so I just keep one in the box.
 
I am buying via lay-by a Makita hammer drill from Cash Converters. Thing's humungous, it comes with two batteries, a charger, and a case the size of my first flat.

For twenty quid.

I checked on eBay for the same kit and the bloke or business selling it wants 80 quid plus 8 quid postage and packing. It's this one, for sake of interest if any:


I just have one, no, several questions - what the heck's an SDS drill when it's home? What can you do with it and what's different about it from a standard hammer drill like the wee Black and Decker kit I already have?

that 12v sds must be circa 25yrs old

best battery sds I ever used was the 24v makita whicj must have been out nearly 20yrs ago
 
Not a drill, but I didn't want to start a new thread.

I bought this yesterday:

WhatsApp Image 2022-04-03 at 13.47.26.jpeg


What an utterly useless piece of junk, and very noisy. Very safe, though: it won't cut anything! Defeated by 20mm floorboards. The main issue is that the blades are crap, I knew pretty much straightaway I looked at them, but decided to give it a go anyway.

Avoid. Handsaw is faster. Much faster. Argos took it back no problem, the sales assistant said "Not the first one we've had back"

You can get better blades for them, but the whole thing vibrates a hell of a lot, which is a big problem in itself.

My pal's bringing round his Makita chop saw later. Look out floorboards!
 

skeetstar

War Hero
Looks like you use it in the same way that you use a jigsaw.. which might be a better buy?
 
Looks like you use it in the same way that you use a jigsaw.. which might be a better buy?

The pic is a little misleading: you can use it as a "normal" saw, and then the little bracket flips over for you to use it as a jigsaw. I imagine it's no good for that either.
 
D

Deleted 184863

Guest
B&D own 3 brands with different niches.
DeWalt is the premium brand, generally for professionals doing tough jobs daily.
Porter Cable is the middle brand. I have several Porter Cable tools, including drill/driver and impact drill. They are still going strong after 12 years (new batteries) and I have built the equivalent of two houses with them. They are high quality, but without the endurance of the DeWalts. If you are only using them for half an hour every day, maybe all day now and then, then they last fine.
As a consequence of acquiring these two, B&D have actually reduced the quality of their orange products, so now I wouldn't touch them with a bargepole.
I use Bosch for tools where precision is important, so I have a Bosch 12" mitre saw for finish carpentry. DeWalt is also good for precision work, and I have a DeWalt jigsaw.
Many professionals around here also like Makita.
If you are cutting precision stuff that mustn't chip, like laminate flooring, then I would suggest you shell out and get Freud's Diablo blades. Whilst they cost a lot, they do a job you will be eternally happy with. The bigger blades can be resharpened, unlike most, so if you have a local sharpener they can work out almost as cheap as the other brands. Their blades are also great for jobs like cutting through old lumber with nails in it, which tends to blunt the cheaper stuff in seconds.
 
Never used Cack and Decker for many years.

You really can't do a job with one drill, well you can, if you pay top dollar, but the scum will have it out of your van in a fortnight.

For small holes in steel and anything up to 34mm in wood, I've just bought the 30 quid corded from Aldi or Lidl, big stuff, the heavy SDS drills on offer from the same, usually around 60 quid, then a little 3.6v for tiddly stuff, then a good cordless like a Makita, the cheaper stuff is rubbish.

Again, Aldi and Lidl tools are pretty good overall, used the alligator saws, jigsaws etc, and no complaints, not up to scratch for say a kitchen fitter, but for odd jobs, excellent.
 
D

Deleted 184863

Guest
Never used Cack and Decker for many years.

You really can't do a job with one drill, well you can, if you pay top dollar, but the scum will have it out of your van in a fortnight.

For small holes in steel and anything up to 34mm in wood, I've just bought the 30 quid corded from Aldi or Lidl, big stuff, the heavy SDS drills on offer from the same, usually around 60 quid, then a little 3.6v for tiddly stuff, then a good cordless like a Makita, the cheaper stuff is rubbish.

Again, Aldi and Lidl tools are pretty good overall, used the alligator saws, jigsaws etc, and no complaints, not up to scratch for say a kitchen fitter, but for odd jobs, excellent.
Seconded.
I use the more powerful corded one for drilling long holes through beams to run wiring, and I have an SDS one for things like foundation bolts. A friend is able to lend me a Hilti SDS drill from his workplace sometimes, which does a job in seconds, but they cost a fortune. I have a cheaper Chinese knock-off now, which is fine if I just drill 2 or 3 holes in one go, then let it cool before the next 3. Because I'm only working for myself, I can schedule to rotate between part-jobs, which means nothing gets too hot, which means I can buy the good DIY grade of tool rather than the much more expensive professional grade.
 
Not a drill, but I didn't want to start a new thread.

I bought this yesterday:

View attachment 652817

What an utterly useless piece of junk, and very noisy. Very safe, though: it won't cut anything! Defeated by 20mm floorboards. The main issue is that the blades are crap, I knew pretty much straightaway I looked at them, but decided to give it a go anyway.

Avoid. Handsaw is faster. Much faster. Argos took it back no problem, the sales assistant said "Not the first one we've had back"

You can get better blades for them, but the whole thing vibrates a hell of a lot, which is a big problem in itself.

My pal's bringing round his Makita chop saw later. Look out floorboards!

Lifting floors ? you want a circular saw with a nail biting blade

I have a 6" blue, mains powered ryobi one cira 20 yrs old which was £35 from b&q, nice heavy cast sole plate
 
Not lifting floors, cutting new floorboards for 0A's father, as well as a bit of fence repair. The Scorpion is supposed to be able to cut small fence posts. On the basis of what I tried, there's no mission.
 
Not lifting floors, cutting new floorboards for 0A's father, as well as a bit of fence repair. The Scorpion is supposed to be able to cut small fence posts. On the basis of what I tried, there's no mission.

I 'duse a electric mitre saw to cut new floor boards

I have a nice 110v makita one from a skip & cheapy b&q one from the same skip on a different day

chipboard floor either a table saw or plunge saw on track

I'd borrow the table saw from my dad or buy a cheapo screwfix plunge saw /
 

TamH70

MIA
Never used Cack and Decker for many years.

You really can't do a job with one drill, well you can, if you pay top dollar, but the scum will have it out of your van in a fortnight.

For small holes in steel and anything up to 34mm in wood, I've just bought the 30 quid corded from Aldi or Lidl, big stuff, the heavy SDS drills on offer from the same, usually around 60 quid, then a little 3.6v for tiddly stuff, then a good cordless like a Makita, the cheaper stuff is rubbish.

Again, Aldi and Lidl tools are pretty good overall, used the alligator saws, jigsaws etc, and no complaints, not up to scratch for say a kitchen fitter, but for odd jobs, excellent.

The ancient cordless Makita SDS drill I bought a while back has done me proud. It sorted out something that would otherwise have been even more of a mare of a job than it was. With that Hitachi Hikoki chuck adaptor I also purchased, it's more versatile than a versatile thingy. I have to stop myself from looking at more projects I can use it for. I fancy a folding table fixed to the wall but I'm not sure that the Council would wear all the bits I'd put in the wall to fix things.
 

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