NEW DETACHMENT COMMANDER

#4
thank you but i really meant for me actually running it, so i do a good job and not make it fail
I know and a good place to start will be a good handover

If you don't know who's who, who is capable of what, who can be a pain in the arse. Where you keep the keys to the tuck shop etc... Your fighting a losing battle.

Hopefully your predecessor will have learnt those lessons so a good brief will set you up

Be honest with your staff and the kids they will see through bullshit and be fair

On a less serious note don't do naughty things with the kids it tends to damage your cadet career
 
#5
haha well it does help that i have been there as an adult instructor for over a year but I just wanted a bit of advice to keep it going as to be fair i havent really ran much there
 
#6
I am about to become a new detachment commander and was wondering if any current/previous detachment commanders have any advice for me.
I have. Make sure your staff are the best available and don't take dubious cast offs from other Detachments. Always concentrate on attracting / recruiting instructors, don't bother about the Cadets. If you have good staff, a lively detachment and drag them out on weekend exercises your Cadets will recruit Cadets for you, via word of mouth.

As an example, when I got my Detachment I was given an Instructor from another Det that was Para badged. He burst into tears when I told him that was his last lot and he would wear the same badge as the Det. I sent him home and told him not to come back.
 
#7
image.jpeg
Interesting post ACAB. Having been in the CCF many years ago when the teachers wore different cap badges RAEC, RSigs, LI,RGJ,GSC and RA it added to the appeal. That said the school cap badge was a bit naff like BUOTC.
 
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RiflemanTom

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#8
I have. Make sure your staff are the best available and don't take dubious cast offs from other Detachments. Always concentrate on attracting / recruiting instructors, don't bother about the Cadets. If you have good staff, a lively detachment and drag them out on weekend exercises your Cadets will recruit Cadets for you, via word of mouth.

As an example, when I got my Detachment I was given an Instructor from another Det that was Para badged. He burst into tears when I told him that was his last lot and he would wear the same badge as the Det. I sent him home and told him not to come back.
Do you mean he was para badged as in he was ex regular and was wearing his wings and beret?

If so then you're saying that you discouraged a trained soldier from imparting his knowledge to cadets? Who do you think lost the most from this. Him or the cadets?

Or do you mean he was just from a different det that wore a different badge?

TBH hardly any CFAVs have done any regular army time and have little real idea about the regiment who's cap badge they're currently wearing anyway.

Why don't the ACF just wear the ACF badge? It'd be much easier.



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#9
He was para badged as in he was ex regular and was wearing his wings and beret?

If so then you're saying that you discouraged a trained soldier from imparting his knowledge to cadets?

Who do you think lost the most from this. Him or the cadets?



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Shhheeeeeeeeeesssshhhhhhhhhhh!

No. He was not.

He was an AI (or whatever they call then nowadays) who had become addicted to the 'kudos' (?) of wearing a navy blue beret with a Para Reg badge. In short he was a uniform freak and a piss poor one as well. If he had have been ex PARA I would, at the very least, expected him to:

A: Not Cry

B: Fill me in (or at least have a pop)
 
#11
The CEO of my old county detested ex regs, so you can imagine what he thought of my detachment where 4 of us were ex regs! :D
 
#12
Aah understood!

Apologies I miss read it.

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Before I got my B Commission the Commandant let me wear the badges and flashes of my old Regiment. As a Detachment Commander I would have kissed the feet of any PARA Reg trained potential AI*

*Well no, I would have locked him in the Armoury with a doss bag and supply of 24 hour Rat Packs! He's mine! mine I tell ya!
 

RiflemanTom

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#13
The CEO of my old county detested ex regs, so you can imagine what he thought of my detachment where 4 of us were ex regs! :D
Amazes me that some of these duffers have a dislike for ex soldiers.

Suppose it's an envy thing at heart.


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#15
Have to say, to the OP, as said above, the most important people are your det staff. I took over a det that had 9 cadets, 2 SI's and 2 CA's (both mothers of cadets in the det)

After a couple of weeks of observation, I went to HQ and lobbied the Commandant to allow me to bring one of my SI's from my previous det - he knew that the new det was in difficulties, so agreed.

After another two weeks of observation and discussions with the SI I had drafted in (against his will, I have to admit), I sacked the two CA's (and their kids went as well), sacked one of the SI's and made it perfectly clear to the other that there was a new sheriff in town. The next week, I had three cadets turn up, the others were never seen again. We did no active recruitment, but six months later, we had 25 cadets on the books, with 20 turning up for every parade night.

So, on paper, far from developing a detachment, I effectively brought it down to a ratio of one staff per cadet. But the remaining SI learned willingly from the guy I had brought in and really came on.

Oh - and the idea of 'film nights' and 'free and easy' nights sound great. Don't - the cadets don't come there to watch a film you recorded off the telly because you couldn't be arsed to plan a programme. It's not a youth club - not to them. And PT nights twice a month are another cop out. Read the manual, plan your programme (it's not easy, but nothing worthwhile ever is) and engage with the cadets and your staff.
 
#17
Have to say, to the OP, as said above, the most important people are your det staff. I took over a det that had 9 cadets, 2 SI's and 2 CA's (both mothers of cadets in the det)

After a couple of weeks of observation, I went to HQ and lobbied the Commandant to allow me to bring one of my SI's from my previous det - he knew that the new det was in difficulties, so agreed.

After another two weeks of observation and discussions with the SI I had drafted in (against his will, I have to admit), I sacked the two CA's (and their kids went as well), sacked one of the SI's and made it perfectly clear to the other that there was a new sheriff in town. The next week, I had three cadets turn up, the others were never seen again. We did no active recruitment, but six months later, we had 25 cadets on the books, with 20 turning up for every parade night.

So, on paper, far from developing a detachment, I effectively brought it down to a ratio of one staff per cadet. But the remaining SI learned willingly from the guy I had brought in and really came on.

Oh - and the idea of 'film nights' and 'free and easy' nights sound great. Don't - the cadets don't come there to watch a film you recorded off the telly because you couldn't be arsed to plan a programme. It's not a youth club - not to them. And PT nights twice a month are another cop out. Read the manual, plan your programme (it's not easy, but nothing worthwhile ever is) and engage with the cadets and your staff.
We were firm believers in lesson plans and not hoofing it, fail to prepare = prepare to fail. ;)
 
#20
We took a detachment of Scouse Kingo cadets on a training camp to Scotland, we stopped at the first services on the way home, the little light fingered feckers nearly emptied the shop! :eek:
 

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