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New CEO for Help for Heroes- Aug 2016

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#1
For those with an interest who may not have seen - and for the 'the good and benefit of the Troop'

Hon Members declaration of interest: I took part in the original Battlefield Bike Ride and have swum in the pool built with some of the early money raised. Also run marathons for both Combat Stress and Blesma.

Note to MoDs @oldbaldy , @Bad CO - I am quite conscious that any thread relating to H4H attracts those with issues they wish to air about the charity.

Submit those with a grievance might wish to take advantage of the existing thread started by Counter-bluffer-ops in 2012.....

Help For Heroes Comes Under Fire

many thanks

Don Cabra
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Help for Heroes announces appointment of new CEO
Thursday August 4, 2016



After our Co-Founder and CEO, Bryn Parry, announced in April that he would be stepping down from his full time role at Help for Heroes in late 2016 the Nomination Committee of the Trustees started the process of searching for a new CEO.

Looking for a successor to lead Help for Heroes with the same vision and determination as the Co-Founders has been no easy task. We are delighted to announce that Melanie Waters, the current Chief Executive of The Poppy Factory – an independent employment charity – has been appointed and will take up her role in November 2016.

Melanie brings experience leading a high-profile organisation which puts the recovery and employment of ex-Service people at its heart. Previously, Melanie held a number of significant roles in both the commercial and charitable sectors leading the External Affairs, Business Improvement and Operations for companies such as the Automobile Association.

In non-executive roles, Melanie is a Director and Commissioner of the £35m Big Lottery grant-giving body, Forces in Mind Trust; a member of NHS England’s Armed Forces Clinical Reference Group; and elected Vice-Chair of Cobseo (Confederation of Service Charities).

Alex Scott-Barrett, Chairman of Trustees, Help for Heroes:

“Melanie brings with her energy and a proven track-record of results. Experienced in both the commercial and charitable sectors, she is a natural leader with expertise in both strategic and operational areas; this will be crucial as the Help for Heroes team drive the next stage of the charity’s development. ”

Melanie Waters:

“Help for Heroes has brought a new energy to the Armed Forces charity sector, drawing significant attention to the current and future needs of Service people who have suffered life-changing injuries and illnesses. The organisation is known by both its beneficiaries and supporters for its uniquely positive culture and the open, easy-to-access support that it offers. I am delighted to have been appointed by the Trustees to lead the organisation and I plan to build upon the incredible work of the Co-Founders and the wider dedicated Help for Heroes team as the charity enters its tenth year.”

Bryn Parry, Co-Founder of Help for Heroes:

"I have worked alongside Melanie in Cobseo and The Poppy Factory for several years. She brings extensive knowledge and skills from both the commercial and third sector and is a much respected leader of a partner charity. She is passionate about helping ‘the blokes’, the wounded, injured and sick Servicemen, women and their families and is fully cognisant of the responsibility to them that this role brings.

The last nine years have been demanding for Emma and me but it is an extraordinary privilege to have been given the opportunity to make a difference to so many very special people. Our role will now change but our commitment to ensuring that 'the blokes' get the very best support, will continue for life. We wish Mel all the best and will look forward to working with her."


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#2
She won't last long - won't be used to such a toxic and bitter environment. Deserves much better.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#3
Melanie is a tough cookie and the right person for the job - let's hope she gets the support she needs
 
#5
Must all be happening on the provider side of the fence, because it certainly doesn't spill into the receiving side.
Indeed, having walked around Tedworth house, they provide a service the MOD could never hope to match.
 
#6
Indeed, having walked around Tedworth house, they provide a service the MOD could never hope to match.
That's a little unfair, the MoD do provide such a service, but only for it's senior officers and civil servants.

You don't expect badly injured oiks to get use do you? make the place look untidy.

Says everything when the replacement fir Headley Court requires begging adverts for funding.
 
#7
Old shot in the arse and Mark won't be too happy. Time they moved on though, and hopefully Melanie will cull this dead wood.
 
#8
Must all be happening on the provider side of the fence, because it certainly doesn't spill into the receiving side.
I wouldn't disagree in the least with that sentiment.
 
#9
That's a little unfair, the MoD do provide such a service, but only for it's senior officers and civil servants.

You don't expect badly injured oiks to get use do you? make the place look untidy.

Says everything when the replacement fir Headley Court requires begging adverts for funding.
For what reasons was Headley Court deemed as being no longer fit for purpose? It seems that they are swapping one kitted out stately pile for another.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#10
Well the fact that it was built in 1945,originally for Officers ,as ORs rehab took place at JSU Chessington down the road had something to do with it.

When Chessington closed, Headley absorbed all ranks rehab.

That and the realisation that it was too small a Centre of Excellence to deal with casualties produced by even two small colonial conflicts made somebody think.

Fantastic place,fantastic people,too small and a constrained footprint.

Which MoD does not own - which is why it was not quite as neglected as the rest of the MOD estate in the Prudence years.....
 
#11
Then there's the aspiration for there to be a national centre of excellence for civilian patients as well. And Headley is not very convenient for RCDM.
 
#12
I'm ******* sorry, why are charities still doing the work/money that the Gvt should be footing
 
#13
Then there's the aspiration for there to be a national centre of excellence for civilian patients as well. And Headley is not very convenient for RCDM.
Hold on to your unicorn for that national centre. No one can truly say what is happening and what the thinking is behind it.

The latest (and most likely) speculation is that by making it a National rather than Defence centre it will allow the seriously injured to continue treatment once discharged. This will be those injured on Ops.
 
#14
I'm ******* sorry, why are charities still doing the work/money that the Gvt should be footing
Because the taxpayer resents shelling out money for "extras" H4H doesn't.
 
#15
I'm ******* sorry, why are charities still doing the work/money that the Gvt should be footing
I think we all know the answer to that one.

Edited to add: Ref the new CEO, may I be the first to say "I would"
 
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#17
It was still RAF Headley Court in 1977 - although the inmates were from all three services, plus a number of civvies (M & F) - and was for Officers and NCOs (the Offrs mess was in the main building, while the SNCO's mess was just over the road from the guardroom).
ORs were down the road at Chessington.
 
#18
Hold on to your unicorn for that national centre. No one can truly say what is happening and what the thinking is behind it.

The latest (and most likely) speculation is that by making it a National rather than Defence centre it will allow the seriously injured to continue treatment once discharged. This will be those injured on Ops.
Not my aspiration, but that of the people behind DNRC:


From the outset the DNRC concept has been about enabling the civilian population to benefit from the rehabilitation expertise built up by Defence, but who are the civilian patients that might benefit, where will they come from and how will it work? In broad terms, although in some respects the position is more complex, the patient cohort will be the civilian equivalents of the Defence cohort groups.
It's a huge leap of faith to imagine that what happens at Headley can be replicated in the new place. Not all the Headley Court staff will want to move, and I suspect that it will be difficult to generate the same sort of ethos from scratch, especially as the new place will have management input from the NHS and other government departments.
 
#19
Perhaps a war tax is the way forward. A referendum to decide whether as a nation we should commit to military action. The kicker being joe blogs is told he has to Stump up his share prior to deployment
 
#20
Perhaps a war tax is the way forward. A referendum to decide whether as a nation we should commit to military action. The kicker being joe blogs is told he has to Stump up his share prior to deployment
It makes you wonder how we could handle a lengthy conflict now. The infrastructure involved in running WW2 was absolutely massive. Everything from defence works to factories and war damage repairs. The scale of debt accrued ensured that we were in a worse position for longer than the Axis countries. The best thing that happened to Germany (West Germany at least) was the Cold War. Money was pumped into it.
 

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